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Uses for fels-naptha soap

By on August 9, 2012
felsnaptha

Fels-Naptha soap is a multi-use product that’s been around for more than 100 years. It’s commonly used to make homemade laundry soap. It’s a great stain remover for oil and grease, and it works on perspiration stains, too.
The first two reader tips share additional ways to use Fels-Naptha soap:

 

On leather:

I have a really good leather bag and it got stained and dirty. I tried Fels-Naptha and it took out the stains with very little rubbing. This stuff is awesome! I’ve also used it on leather car seats. I just conditioned them with Leather CPR afterward! — Dy, email

Keep bugs away:

I’ve heard that a bar mixed with five gallons of water can be used as an alternative to insecticides (similar to deer repellent) on fruit and vegetable plants. Spray once before the fruit comes in (around flowering time) and again after the fruit has started to grow but is far from ripe. I found out too late for this year’s crop, but I’ll definitely be trying it next year. — Aaron, email

Flavor powdered milk:

We’ve been drinking powdered skim milk for many years. A few drops of liquid Stevia and a teaspoon of vanilla or almond extract make it very tasty. Even my grandkids will drink it. Just don’t use it for mashed potatoes or tomato soup. — Bob, forums

Budget food:

One-pot meals are usually the most economical because they can be stretched with less expensive ingredients. But I think any carbs, or at least a lot of them, need to be whole grains or people just get hungry sooner than they should, and that costs more money than snacks and stuff.
I was raised that white bread, refined pasta, white rice, etc., were the best things to stretch a meal, but after at least 25 years of studying and experimenting with different foods, I’m now convinced whole foods are the best value, despite the fact that they’re often more expensive. They’re healthier and more filling, so less food is needed to fill a person up and keep someone feeling full, which is worth what you’re paying for it.
Any boxed, canned or frozen meal is out if you want foods that are healthy for growing and/or working bodies and that will keep people full longer. It’s false economy to go for the cheapest foods, because so many of them are lacking in nutritional value.
I use brown rice to stretch meats rather than white rice, and I bake my own whole grain breads instead of buying white breads, etc. Beans are good mixed in with hamburger for sloppy joes, tacos and more, as is brown rice or wild rice.
One recipe that went a long way when our kids were at home was cabbage soup. It could be made in the crockpot or on the stove, and it was filling without requiring a lot of meat.
Cabbage Soup
1 pound hamburger, cooked and drained
1 onion, chopped
1 tall can tomato juice
1 small head cabbage, coarsely chopped
1 can kidney beans, drained and rinsed (add another can to stretch the soup, if desired)
Mix all in slow cooker or soup pot and simmer until veggies are tender.
There are a lot of add-ins for this, too. You can add some pasta (half cup or so), barley, rice, wild rice, etc., to bulk it up a little and add some different texture. A little bit won’t cause a sugar spike, but it looks nice and does add to the dish. You can throw in shredded carrots, chopped bell pepper, broccoli or cauliflower pieces, chili beans and kidney beans, black pepper and Tabasco. For extra protein, sprinkle with shredded cheese or melt a slice of American cheese in each bowl and mix it up. This recipe makes a lot and freezes well. — S.D., Minnesota

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About Sara Noel

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2 Comments

  1. diana

    9/30/2012 at 3:15 am

    what is the difference in nasta and ivory? I have the same recipes using ivory? is there a distinction?

  2. SusanG.

    10/28/2012 at 7:44 pm

    My mother used Fels-Naptha soap to clean shirt collars. Dampen the collar and rub with the bar of soap, let sit for a few minutes – scrub with a nail brush, put in the washer.

    Also, she made us wash with it if we got into poison ivy.

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