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How to Get Cheap Transportation for a Large Group

By on February 10, 2017
How to Get Cheap Transportation for a Large Group

How to Get Cheap Transportation for a Large Group

Getting from Point A to Point B has become less of a struggle over the years. After all, you’ve got planes, trains, cars, buses and other public transportation systems to choose from.

But when it comes to moving a large group of people, the challenge grows. Maybe you have a sports team that needs to travel to away games throughout the season. Maybe you partake in band trips, work conferences or choir performances. Or maybe you simply have that rare family reunion at a destination location.

Whatever the occasion, it pays to figure out which form of group transportation will be most convenient, efficient and cost-effective in the long run. The best place to start — the research.

Looking at the Research

This infographic shows a simple breakdown of which modes of transportation are cheapest, safest, fastest, most comfortable and environmentally friendly.

Source: http://airfare.michaelbluejay.com/modes.html

Car

As you can see, the car — America’s favorite form of travel — has the worst overall record for environmental impact and safety. In addition, it becomes a headache to organize group travel when multiple vehicles are needed.

Bus

Bus travel offers a nice balance of cost-efficiency, safety, comfort and environmental impact, whether you’re traveling short or long distances. Buses are also much more accommodating to group travel, since only one driver is needed.

Train

The train is arguably the most comfortable form of travel, though it isn’t the most cost-efficient for short trips. When it comes to group travel, the fewer people in your group, the better. The more people you have, the further in advance you must coordinate and buy tickets.

Plane

Flying is the safest form of travel, but you’ll save gads of money by renting a van or bus for shorter trips. When you’re not sure if driving or flying will be cheaper, try using a Drive or Fly? calculator.

Applying the Research to Your Needs

For a one-time trip — say your family is traveling across the country for a cousin’s wedding — you don’t have to go to great lengths to decide how to travel. You can simply compare prices between the various modes of transportation and buy tickets as needed.

If, on the other hand, your group is going to be traveling somewhat frequently, you should consider these options.

Renting a Van or Bus

If you’re only going to be traveling as a group once or twice a year, renting an appropriately sized vehicle means:

  • Paying less — the bigger the group and the longer the trips, the more you save
  • Avoiding the frustrations of coordinating multiple vehicles
  • Getting to keep the entire group together while traveling
  • Having more productive group travel — passengers can sleep, eat, talk, read, play games and entertain themselves

Buying a Van or Bus

The more frequently your group travels, the more appealing this option becomes. For instance, if you’re a sports team that travels nearly every weekend throughout game season, buying a van or bus means:

  • Saving money — the more frequently the group travels, the sooner you get back your initial investment and save in the long run
  • Taking your pick of new or used — you can save more used, but know what to look for when you go to buy
  • Getting to make your vehicle your own — explore the wonderful world of decals, personalized license plates and whatever else radiates your group’s awesome spirit

If buying a bus isn’t in the cards for you, that’s alright. The most important thing is to find the type of transportation that makes sense for your particular group and its particular needs. Maybe, after a couple years of saving and fundraising, that team vehicle won’t seem so far out of reach.

Have a Great Trip!

Bus, plane, train or car — no matter how you travel, don’t lose sight of the most important aspects of your trip. That is, reaching your destination. Traveling hiccups are inevitable, but if you’re planning with your group’s best interests at heart, you’re already that much closer to smooth sailing.

Scott Huntington is a writer from central Pennsylvania. He enjoys working on his home and garden with his wife and 2 kids. Follow him on Twitter @SMHuntington

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