Making own lunchmeat
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  1. #1
    Registered User Sonnenwende's Avatar
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    Default Making own lunchmeat

    My husband and I probably go through 12-16 oz of turkey lunchmeat a week for lunch. I was wondering if anyone had any experience with making their own lunchmeat maybe with a roasted turkey breast, if it was more trouble than it was worth or not.

    Thanks!

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    Registered User sunshine's Avatar
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    We do this all the time -- we rarely buy packaged lunch meats. . . Ham, roast beef, turkey. .

    I generally get a large turkey breast, roast it. . .let it cool. We have a meat slicer, although an electric knife would probably work too. Then we slice the meat into thin slices.

    Just remember -- it won't have the preservatives, etc. that store bought meats have -- so keep it frozen, or use it quickly.

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    Registered User Momto2Boyz's Avatar
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    We do this too. Although, I don't purchase meats specifically for lunch meat. If I am going to make a ham and it is on sale, I buy a HUGE one. Then freeze the leftovers in thin slices (I just use a carving knife). We do this for chicken and turkey too.

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    Registered User Sonnenwende's Avatar
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    Thanks! I think the next time I am at the store, I will pick up a turkey breast and try this over the weekend.

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    Registered User The Muse's Avatar
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    I make my own tofu bacon and "tofurky" because it's cheaper than buying the prepared stuff AND I know what's in it.

    Seems like making your own traditional coldcuts would be even easier and well worth the effort.

    100% Debt Free.... home, car & credit cards.
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    Moderator nuisance26's Avatar
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    ~Turkey breasts are usually pretty expensive aren't they? If you can, weigh the finished anount of meat you get from the breast after cooking. Subtract about a dollar from how much you paid for the breast(the approximate value of the carcass which you can make broth from). Then use how much you paid and how much you got to determine your price per pound. You may be better off buying deli turkey when it's on sale for $2-3lb and freezing it. I don't know if there's such a thing as a canned turkey like the canned hams, but I just noticed a sign in the grocery store up near the canned hams that said their deli would slice the ham to order. It may be cheaper per lb that way and you don't have to spend 1/2 an hour at home slicing it yourself.~

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    Registered User sunshine's Avatar
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    I can get the turkey breasts at our GFS store really cheap. .. then I can either have them slice them, or slice them myself.

    I do the ham and roast beef like Sarah stated above.

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    Registered User foxxyroxie's Avatar
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    I buy the whole hams on sale for $1.40 to $1.60 per pound. I have the store thinly slice it -- because it's FREE. I bring it home and divide it into quart size freezer bags (in various weights) and freeze it. This way, I can pull out a small amount when I need it.

    We also buy the 'cheap' bologna when it's on sale and freeze it. I've gotten it as cheap as 75 cents a lb.

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    Registered User freyadog's Avatar
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    my son when little loved potted meat. I would take hotdogs and cook them and then mash up, add mayo and a dash of pickle for lunch meat.

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    Moderator nuisance26's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuisance26 View Post
    ~Turkey breasts are usually pretty expensive aren't they? If you can, weigh the finished amount of meat you get from the breast after cooking. Subtract about a dollar from how much you paid for the breast(the approximate value of the carcass which you can make broth from). Then use how much you paid and how much you got to determine your price per pound. You may be better off buying deli turkey when it's on sale for $2-3lb and freezing it. I don't know if there's such a thing as a canned turkey like the canned hams, but I just noticed a sign in the grocery store up near the canned hams that said their deli would slice the ham to order. It may be cheaper per lb that way and you don't have to spend 1/2 an hour at home slicing it yourself.~
    ~I just cooked a 13lb turkey last night. I sliced and picked off as much meat as I could and got 3lbs 6 oz of sandwich quality turkey. Then I cooked down the rest and got 90 oz of broth and another 14 oz of dark, soup meat. Since turkey was $.89lb($11.57 whole turkey)and the broth has a value of about $2.50, I figure the 4lbs4oz of meat to have cost $9($2.11lb). I also had to put in almost 2 hours of work to cook, pick, pack, make broth, pick, pack and put away. Hope that helps someone else figure if it's worth it or not.~

  11. #11
    Registered User LLDG's Avatar
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    Every Sunday night I cook or grill (depends on time of year) four chicken breasts. One is for dinner that night, two for dinners later during the week and one is for my husband's lunches all week.

    One chicken breast cut up into long slices will go five days. I make his lunch on non-hydrogenated (transfat) Flatbread with a little mayo (mayo made with olive oil), mustard and some pickles. He loves it. Its very inexpensive. Very healthy: low fat and no hydrogenated oils.

  12. #12
    Registered User mn30's Avatar
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    Another thing you can do to prolong deli meat if you don't want to freeze it is to ask the deli clerk to "Cyro-vac" it. All deli's should have this machine. Once the meat is cyro-vaced, it's good for 30 days in the fridge, that is until you open it. Our deli does this for customers because they don't want to shop for deli meat 2 or 3 times a week.

    Marie

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