Part #2 of my rural living story
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  1. #1
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    Exclamation Part #2 of my rural living story

    Part #2 of my rural living story is about the main street of our small town. Again, overwhelmed by all I seen and thought about, I wrote this out. I'll add to it at the end, now being 9 months later.

    The main street

    Have you ever found yourself back in time when you've gone on a trip and gone through some rural towns. Have you wondered where they come up with some of the main streets when you've seen a movie. Ever thought about how the names came about for streets and where the first Main street began. Well after going for a walk I know I for sure have stepped back in time and I'm a loving it.

    Can I tell you about our main street. There is an older building, probably the old town hall which now houses the fire truck. Its a two story building, with the windows upstairs all boarded in. Cracks are on the wall and outside is a huge bell which I wonder what it was used for. Did they use those to ring out a fire, be it a home, business or prairie fire. Was it used to call school children or did they use it for ringing out church services.

    Further on down, is the old Solo store which now houses the musuem and in the front windows are a butter churn (two different types), the glass one and the old wooden one. There is an old phonograph that played records where you placed the needle down and it played the music but in such funny sounds. The speaker (as such) is large, round and black. Along with that is a homemade high chair, a buggie I'd give my eye tooth for, a doctor's bag from when the doctors visited the home along with a few other antiques. That will be my first visit this summer as soon as it opens.

    Walking down the sidewalks, I see older buildings, many for sale. This street looks like it come right out of the movies where cowboys and Indians fought. Not boarded up as of yet, but cracks in the brick walls, unpainted outsides and a reminder that the town was once a thriving town but is now dying. No, I have that wrong, its not dying. There are 2 grocery stores, 2 hardware stores, a Ford dealer, a variety store, a drop in centre and the town hall (a smaller building down the street). They have a new credit union and a post office. Plus we've increased their population by 5, us.

    Further down is the elevator, still standing tall, reminding us that this is grain country. It too is old and dilapitated, not quite falling down but long past it's time. I wonder, will it be exchanged for the brand new elevators they build today, with cement, telling travellers that were still in the prairies but have advanced to the 21st century. I wonder too, how many times did farmers meet there with their grain only to see the prices fall. Did they survive or did they turn to other careers, leaving behind farms and a way of life.

    The Ford dealership has been around for 60 years, passed down from generation to generation. How many men talked of their dreams to own a car or truck there. How many bought their first car there, who knows. Did they talk of families and farming or did they just dream about owning that new Ford that first came out so many years ago. Was it there they purchased their very first car as a young man? Do they reminisce of the wars they fought in and talk about what the world is doing today? Do they gather there still to talk of days gone past.

    Then there is the hardware store, again there for 50 years. This too has been passed down from generation to generation. What changes have they seen. Walking into the store is like walking into a gold mine because they have everything from soup to nuts and the kitchen sink. You can barely walk the two isles and to find something, well thats a story all in itself. The older man tells you to call him "old chuck" and his son, a special needs adult smiles and rocks back and forth, working the till though from I'm sure much training. A huge cat strolls out to meet you the minute you walk in, rubbing against your legs, ready for you to pick him up.

    Then there are the buildings for sale. Older buildings, yet useful. I wonder, will someone purchase them. Only time will tell.

    Further on my walk is a "caboose". There no longer used on trains, but our small town has made use of a "caboose". This I guess would be called recycling. It is the tourist information centre, opened during the summer. Right on main street.

    Next comes the small town office, where they aren't quite sure where to find things because everything is piled quite high. No computer here, they use the good old book keeping books of long ago.

    Then comes the church which I'm sure could tell many stories, of marriages, deaths, little ones being baptized and such. An old building, we can see it out our ds's bedroom window, a reminder of how faith was such an important part of rural life. Another street boasts another church and on another street stands another church, built in 1894 the same year we expect our home was built. Are there services at these churches, I'm not sure. But I am sure, each one can tell stories that would be something to hear I'm sure.

    Do you get the picture of going back into a time where families were so very important, where families passed down from generation to generation businesses, where faith was an integral part of rural living along with farming and such. I've taken to walking everyday just to enjoy this street, to gaze in awe at the buildings and wonder what they could tell me could they talk. I go too just to see the older generation and wonder how much I'll learn from them once I get to know them.

    Yes I do love it here more with each passing day. Dd wrote to her penpal today and said "I love country living, its so quiet." I have to agree "I love country living, not only is it quiet but it has so much to tell."

    Added on: I've now been to most of these buildings and have enjoyed getting to know the owners/managers of many of these places. They are warm and caring people, who have made us feel so at home here. I watch often while in my vehicle, the older generation trying to keep our town from dying by purchasing as many items has they can at each store. They don't travel to nearby towns or cities, only because they know what its like to have to move when a town dies.

    As I walk these streets, older gentleman smile and say hi and the elderly ladies are so sweet. Always a smile on their face and yet I know they've all gone through heartache and struggles, just as we do today.

    Do I still love our small rural town and have the same enthusiasm I did 9 months ago. Yes and its grown. The gentle quietness and simple living is everywhere I go and yet the 21st century is also coming. We now have more interac services from when we first came and yet I really am back in time, where checks are honored, where credit is still given without cc, and where a simple handshake means something.


    More tomorrow!!

  2. #2
    Registered User Sherryh's Avatar
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    I want to be your neighbor.

    This is so nice... thanks for sharing your life with us each day.

  3. #3
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    This sounds like such a wonderful town. I grew up in the country and I would not trade it for anything in the world! Can't wait to read more.

    Janet

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    Registered User COUNTRYBUMPKIN's Avatar
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    These are great! Keep writing more!

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    Registered User captclearance's Avatar
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    I love it... Keep the stories coming

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    Registered User Katybird's Avatar
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    Books are the treasured wealth of the world and the fit inheritance of generations and nations. --Henry David Thoreau




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