Do you think being frugal causes being greener or being green causes frugality?
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  1. #1
    Registered User Homekeepn's Avatar
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    Default Do you think being frugal causes being greener or being green causes frugality?

    And what triggered your personal green/frugal journey?

    I started out many years ago clipping coupons and shopping frugally because that was how I was raised. When I got married and started having children frugal shopping was necessary for a balanced budget.

    The small city that we lived in had curbside recycling and we participated faithfully. We grew a large garden, hung our laundry, watched the utility usage and shopped at yard sales. We also kept are cars tuned up, tires at the correct pressure, hubby changed our own oil and filters then brought the oil to be recycled.

    We still do those things now, but with the hubs being out of work we have added even more things. For an example:

    1. We now keep all reusable plastic bags that are clean and in good condition, bread bags, bags that the 5 lbs of pasta or rice comes in.
    Basically if the container had food in it when I bought it, I will reuse it.

    2. Paper bags that sugar and flour comes in. I cut it open and lay it flat. It work great for drying off fried food. Then I might use it as a fire starter if the timing is right. This goes for boxes that mixes and cereal comes in too. Although the boxes are not as absorbent as the paper bags.

    3. Bags that cereal comes in is used to coat meat with seasoned flour before cooking or to cut it open and use it like waxed paper.

    What about you? What is your opinion? As for me I think frugality was first, but now it walks hand in hand.

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    I think being frugal (for me) is green. I recycle,reuse,reduce.
    We buy at garage sales which reduces packaging and things going to the dump for money reasons.

    But being green isn't necessarily cheap. Green houses cost more. Solar is not a cost easily revamped and so on. So no. Would have to be my initial thought.
    Some things like bulbs save tons but are they green? Not using as much electricity is green but how they are made.disposal?? They have mercury.
    I guess I'm not sure what is green "commercialism/hype" and what can be traced back all the way to say wow I did good.
    And yes whatever we can do helps.

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    Registered User Homekeepn's Avatar
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    I agree. I wish I could afford solar or wind power. Also a lot of organic food is out of my budget in winter.

    I do hope that the currant "green hype" does get ingrained in some minds permanently before being out of vogue. It is sad to say but I think of it could be a lazy, I don't care attitude.

    Thank you for your thoughts.

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    Registered User morrisjlm3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Homekeepn View Post
    And what triggered your personal green/frugal journey?

    I started out many years ago clipping coupons and shopping frugally because that was how I was raised. When I got married and started having children frugal shopping was necessary for a balanced budget.

    The small city that we lived in had curbside recycling and we participated faithfully. We grew a large garden, hung our laundry, watched the utility usage and shopped at yard sales. We also kept are cars tuned up, tires at the correct pressure, hubby changed our own oil and filters then brought the oil to be recycled.

    We still do those things now, but with the hubs being out of work we have added even more things. For an example:

    1. We now keep all reusable plastic bags that are clean and in good condition, bread bags, bags that the 5 lbs of pasta or rice comes in.
    Basically if the container had food in it when I bought it, I will reuse it.

    2. Paper bags that sugar and flour comes in. I cut it open and lay it flat. It work great for drying off fried food. Then I might use it as a fire starter if the timing is right. This goes for boxes that mixes and cereal comes in too. Although the boxes are not as absorbent as the paper bags.

    3. Bags that cereal comes in is used to coat meat with seasoned flour before cooking or to cut it open and use it like waxed paper.

    What about you? What is your opinion? As for me I think frugality was first, but now it walks hand in hand.
    Even better, I believe living a natural and pure lifestyle results in being more sustainable. Living a "green" lifestyle isn't necessarily always the best for your health neither is being frugal.

    I believe your journey to a better lifestyle starts with your health & wellness. You should strive to consume and use the most natural purest things available.

    There are many directions you could go with a frugal lifestyle. What are your priorities? Are you trying to live as cheap as possible or are you trying to consume less but still use items that may be pricier like natural and pure products and organic food.

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    Registered User Dancing Lotus's Avatar
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    For me first came frugal.

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    Registered User KeithBC's Avatar
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    I see being "green" as being about not wasting resources. To me, frugality is more about not wasting than it is about saving money. Of course, avoiding waste does tend to save money.

    But, to me, sustainability is the key value at work here. Living sustainably requires being frugal, even if it sometimes demands investment in capital equipment.

    For example, I recently bought an electric-assist bicycle. It was a major expense, but I see it as improving the sustainability of my lifestyle, and therefore a frugal purchase.

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    Registered User Homekeepn's Avatar
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    Keith...could you tell me more about your bike. I am really interested in man generated power.

    Wouldn't it be cool to have fitness center contribute to the power grid. All those treadmills and stationary bikes could generate a lot kws. They could call I "Planet Green Fitness" Ha Ha.

    Sorry too early in the morning and not enough coffee for me.

    Morris Lm3...Thank you for your thoughts. You mentioned priorities. Mine have evolved as my life has. I am a more conscious consumer. I have incorporated more nature items when I could afford to do so. From growing a large garden, making my own natural cleaners,to buying items that are recycled, organic and free trade.
    I wish that I could afford to do more. If money wasn't stopping me I would have a hybrid car, solar and/or wind power and more land to grow food to help the community. Also I would do what Larry Hagman (J.R. Ewing) has done. His property generates enough wind and solar power to not only supply his own large house with power, but also his neighbors down the road. And of course he gives it to them at no cost.

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    Thanks Keith for the idea...DH & I are discussing this! I work downhill 5 mi away. Easy to get to on a bike, hard to get back, and I'm tired at the end of the day too! So you started a conversation between us about what we can do...?

    Thanks again --

    Judi

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    Registered User Debbie-cat's Avatar
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    My Mom has one of those electric powered bicycles and LOVES it! She zips around town just as fast as a car!
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    Registered User greekislandgirl's Avatar
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    I started out very very green and along the way needed to start being frugal as well but I do think they are two entirely different things (often).

    Our dream as a couple is to build a house that is self-sustaining and that would mean we would gather our own energy (solar, wind, etc) but in order to get there the house will cost a fortune in materials, architects, and equipment, and we know that. I think of it as an investment because eventually after the initial cost it should be much LESS expensive to maintain. But the overall cost effectiveness will depend on how long we live. Since we aren't going to have children some may think that we will never see a major return on the investment - on the other hand, we care about the environment a lot - it was actually one of the things that drew us to each other when we first met even - and it's important to us to do what we can to live a green lifestyle. I do sincerely hope that someday we can make it a reality. But it will so NOT be a low-cost house compared to a standard one of the same size.

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    Registered User Imarachne's Avatar
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    I think they were interchangeable for me. I was raised in a frugal home but in my life its been out of necessity.

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    Registered User KeithBC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Homekeepn View Post
    Keith...could you tell me more about your bike. I am really interested in man generated power.
    It is a regular 24-speed mountain bike with an electric assist package installed at the factory. Here is a link to the bike. Here is a link to the electric package, which is available as a retrofit.

    Judi, you won't have to worry about your hill with this combination. We have a 13% hill between our house and the local store. That is way steeper than roads are allowed to be these days. I can ride up it easily with the electric assist cranked up to max. Going downhill, you can use generative braking, so it recharges the battery as well as controlling your speed.

    How long the charge lasts depends on the level of assist you select. At 25% assist, it is supposed to last for 50 km. At 200% assist, it is good for about 5 trips up the big hill, which is about 300 metres long.

    The electric assist works as a percentage of your effort on the pedals. No effort, no assist. But when you lean into the pedals to go up a hill, it's like lighting an afterburner.

    It's a very cool transportation machine!

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    Registered User Daisygirl's Avatar
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    My "greenness" has developed along the path to frugality. I know many don't see it this way, but I tie in my eco-sensitive lifestyle with my faith. When the Earth came into being, sure, it was fine for folks to eat meat here and there. However, the population of the Earth has exploded and an omni lifestyle is no longer viable. It uses way too many natural resources. It causes animal cruelty as factory farmers stuff more and more sentient beings into a cage to make more money. It causes tons of waste, as the world is no longer a place that uses every part of the animal.

    So we have become vegetarians, we rarely use disposable things, we cook from scratch and purchase in bulk. We do this to be good "stewards of the Earth" because the world situation has changed. What was reasonable and acceptable and non-harmful before just isn't that way anymore.

    I do spend more money buying local organic but I save a lot in not buying meat or disposable items. It's all about the balance for me.

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    I was raised to be frugal. I was one of those children who wore cloth diapers and whose Mom cooked from scratch, cleaned and reused Tin Foil, washed out bread bags, washed clothes in closed water and hung dry the laundry. We went by the rule If it's yellow let it mellow... We always shopped at garage sales and Goodwill, grew our own fruits and veggies in the backyard. That was close to 50 years ago long before the Enviro "Green" stuff today started.

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    For me, it was a necessity at first, now it's a choice. I was frugal first, then green. Now they are hand in hand.

    I try to keep my consumerism to a minimum as everything is manufactured with contents trucked to the factory, trucked to a warehouse, then trucked to a store. Of course, some things are unavoidable. I'll pay higher prices to buy food locally but I am trying to do more and more to lessen my impact and be as self sufficient as I can. )

    Overall, I spend way less now than what I did 5 years ago, yet eat better, put next to nothing in the waste stream and keep trying to lower what goes in the recycle stream.

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