My DH is a diabetic help?
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  1. #1
    Registered User mh3rdwheel's Avatar
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    Default My DH is a diabetic help?

    Last Wednes we went to the doctors for all the blood work that was done the week before, his doctor said that his cholesterol is too high, he has mild carporal tunnel syndrom, his disc between L4 and L5 are hardening? and pinching off nerves, dh also had a test done for diabetes, when we were ther she never mentioned the diabetes, so I brought it up, her response was he is a diabetic but it is controled with diet. (dh's cholesterol is very high)

    I asked questions she said to not eat pumpkin pie, cherry pie, bread, and potatoes and starches. We are lost to what to do.I am at a lost at what to do. Any help.

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    If it can be controlled by diet, then he must be a type 2 diabetic. Try searching for type 2 diabetes and diet. I hope he can get his blood sugar and cholesterol under control. Diabetes and heart disease are a bad combination to have.

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    Registered User mh3rdwheel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bonnotsm9 View Post
    If it can be controlled by diet, then he must be a type 2 diabetic. Try searching for type 2 diabetes and diet. I hope he can get his blood sugar and cholesterol under control. Diabetes and heart disease are a bad combination to have.
    The doctor said that he had diabetes as an after thought, and only when I mentioned the test (his dad has it), I did go to the library today after work and get cookbooks on diabetes. We do not know what his blood sugar is, she never said, I will have to get with my very bad diabetic sister and use her glucometer and see what his blood sugar is Thanks.

    Thank you.

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    Registered User Contrary Housewife's Avatar
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    My DH was given a similar diagnosis this past summer. High cholesterol and borderline diabetes.

    Easy diet changes = limit the starchy food like bread, potatoes, corn, rice, and all sugars (white table sugar, honey, corn syrup, fruit juices, soda, etc) to one serving a day. These are foods that make his diabetes worse.

    Add more vegetables, especially green ones, and use whole grains like oatmeal, barley and brown rice.

    DH switched to Splenda for his tea and coffee.

    For the cholesterol he was told to give up pork (tough to do, but we did cut back on it) and limit his red meat (also tough to do as we are both carnivores) and to add more fish (which we have). He is supposed to use olive oil or margarine with 0 trans fat (he likes Brummel&Brown) and stay off the butter.

    We found out that he can have canadian bacon (2 slices) and two *small* eggs once in a while and it is not too much cholesterol. Otherwise he is supposed to avoid eggs, or only eat egg whites.

    I also cut back on the amount of fried food I make and went back to doing more broiling and grilling. I switched to buying lowfat or nonfat dairy items now, too.
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    Moderator aka AmyBob AmyBoz's Avatar
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    I'm a Type 2 diabetic, also. Contrary Housewife did a good job of summarizing the diet we need to follow. It's hard to stick to, when you are used to a lifetime of eating whatever you want, but the longer you control with diet and exercise, the longer you can hold off on medication. Make sure to stock the house with plenty of foods he can eat so he doesn't feel deprived.

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    Registered User mh3rdwheel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Contrary Housewife View Post
    My DH was given a similar diagnosis this past summer. High cholesterol and borderline diabetes.

    Easy diet changes = limit the starchy food like bread, potatoes, corn, rice, and all sugars (white table sugar, honey, corn syrup, fruit juices, soda, etc) to one serving a day. These are foods that make his diabetes worse.

    Add more vegetables, especially green ones, and use whole grains like oatmeal, barley and brown rice.

    DH switched to Splenda for his tea and coffee.

    For the cholesterol he was told to give up pork (tough to do, but we did cut back on it) and limit his red meat (also tough to do as we are both carnivores) and to add more fish (which we have). He is supposed to use olive oil or margarine with 0 trans fat (he likes Brummel&Brown) and stay off the butter.

    We found out that he can have canadian bacon (2 slices) and two *small* eggs once in a while and it is not too much cholesterol. Otherwise he is supposed to avoid eggs, or only eat egg whites.

    I also cut back on the amount of fried food I make and went back to doing more broiling and grilling. I switched to buying lowfat or nonfat dairy items now, too.
    We only use sugar in honey and in pumkin pie, also we don't use corn syrup, fruit juices, honey or and only 1 to two cans a day, should he switch to diet pop, this is my thought?

    We do not eat alot of red meat, but lots of pork, chicken breats, and we ground our own ground meat. We stay away from the butter and use margarine, etc.

    I am confused on the exchanges. Do I need to worry>

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    Registered User mh3rdwheel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AmyBoz View Post
    I'm a Type 2 diabetic, also. Contrary Housewife did a good job of summarizing the diet we need to follow. It's hard to stick to, when you are used to a lifetime of eating whatever you want, but the longer you control with diet and exercise, the longer you can hold off on medication. Make sure to stock the house with plenty of foods he can eat so he doesn't feel deprived.
    DH and I love veggies cooked or uncooked. (cooked in heart smart broth), that is a meal in itself. The problem would be with exercise, with his bad foot, neck and back ( he keeps falling to the ground), we have a walking trail near our apartment, but the last time we used it he endind up in the hospital and I couldn't hardly walk for a week.

    Any suggestions for at home workouts, etc?

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    Registered User mh3rdwheel's Avatar
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    My husband is lactose intolerant and does not do eggs or milk (makes him puke), that is why his bones are so brittle, he is constantly breaking bones. He broke his back 3 times, neck 3 times, left arm 3 times, right arm 4 times, plus his knuckles.

    The wet weather we have been having is messing with his bones.

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    Registered User Neeley's Avatar
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    I've been a type 2 diabetic for years. I do not completely avoid any foods 100%. I am not a juice drinker, but every once in a while if I want a glass of OJ I'll measure out 6 oz and drink that. If I want a piece of cake, pie or ice cream, I have a small one. I eat sandwiches, baked potatoes, etc...It is all about moderation, carb counting and exercise. Making a food forbidden only makes you want it more.

    He needs to see a diabetic nutritionist to learn about portion sizes in relation to carb exchanges, carb counting, etc...Also it matters WHEN he takes his blood sugar. There is a huge difference in taking your blood sugar before a meal, right after a meal, an hour after a meal, etc...He needs to learn about exercising in correlation to diabetes, especially when he has had too many carbs to bring his levels down. There are times when you need to go for a walk to bring your levels down and other times any form of exercise will actually increase the glucose level in your body due to your body seeing the exercise as stress. Just because a food or candy says "sugar free" does not mean it won't raise your levels. Nothing makes me cringe more than to see someone I know is diabetic chow down on loads of sugar free candy and think it is all OK and their levels are not going to go up. Drinking anything with sugar, like soda, fruit juices, sweet tea should be cut to a minimum, if not avoided. Those are what my nutritionist calls wasted carbs.

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    Registered User Neeley's Avatar
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    As far as exercise goes, anyone can sit in a chair and do arm rotations, lift a 1lb weight up and down, raise their legs up and down at the knees, wiggle in their seat, tap their toes, etc...Even a bed bound patient can do some form of exercise while lying in the bed. Wheelchair bound and patients with severe mobility issues do exercises everyday. Google wheelchair exercises, exercises for those with mobility issues or something along those lines.

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    Registered User mh3rdwheel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neeley View Post
    I've been a type 2 diabetic for years. I do not completely avoid any foods 100%. I am not a juice drinker, but every once in a while if I want a glass of OJ I'll measure out 6 oz and drink that. If I want a piece of cake, pie or ice cream, I have a small one. I eat sandwiches, baked potatoes, etc...It is all about moderation, carb counting and exercise. Making a food forbidden only makes you want it more.

    He needs to see a diabetic nutritionist to learn about portion sizes in relation to carb exchanges, carb counting, etc...Also it matters WHEN he takes his blood sugar. There is a huge difference in taking your blood sugar before a meal, right after a meal, an hour after a meal, etc...He needs to learn about exercising in correlation to diabetes, especially when he has had too many carbs to bring his levels down. There are times when you need to go for a walk to bring your levels down and other times any form of exercise will actually increase the glucose level in your body due to your body seeing the exercise as stress. Just because a food or candy says "sugar free" does not mean it won't raise your levels. Nothing makes me cringe more than to see someone I know is diabetic chow down on loads of sugar free candy and think it is all OK and their levels are not going to go up. Drinking anything with sugar, like soda, fruit juices, sweet tea should be cut to a minimum, if not avoided. Those are what my nutritionist calls wasted carbs.
    Dh was never given anything to test is sugar, the doctor only told us after I mentioned it to her. My sister is on a monitor that goes off if your sugar drops. what can I do. sorry I am going to bed.

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    Registered User Neeley's Avatar
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    The first thing he needs to do is get an appointment with an endocrinologist. He/she will most likely do the proper diabetic testing. If he is truly diabetic he will be prescribed a glucometer and test strips. You can buy a glucometer and strips over the counter, but most insurances will cover it if it is prescribed. The test strips can get costly so having a prescription for them and going through insurance is better if possible. He/she will most likely refer your DH to a diabetic nutritionist who can teach him the proper way and time to take his sugar, proper portion sizes for food (which can be a real eye opener for some), the number of carbs he should stay under per meal, how to treat a high, how to treat a low, what to do on sick days, how to deal with stress in relation to sugar levels, etc...

    The endocrinologist will also most likely run an A1C test to see what his average blood sugar level has been over the past three months. Most diabetics need to see their endocrinologist every six months and have an A1C test at each appointment.

    If he is diabetic, his endocrinologist will most likely also have him see an ophthalmologist (not an optometrist) at least once a year along with his dentist every six months and possibly a podiatrist on a regular basis as well. Getting proper eye care and dental care is imperative for a diabetic. Not to mention having his feet checked regularly for ulcers, injuries, ingrown toenails or other issues that can quickly lead to amputation is very important.

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    Registered User Contrary Housewife's Avatar
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    <q>Any suggestions for at home workouts, etc? </q>

    Look up "chair exercises" or "office workout" and you will find things he can do while seated. The important part is that he gets his heart pumping.

    I also signed DH up for a year of Diabetic Living magazine. It was cheap and has lots of lifestyle tips, as well as recipes you can use. Your library might have a subscription you can look at too. Their website offers a free newsletter and lots of tips. Diabetic Living

    It sounds to me like your doctor did not give you very much information. You should call and ask about it. They may have nutritional and exercise handouts, or can refer you to a nutritionist or a nurse who can guide you. Your insurance may cover something like a "learning to live with diabetes" class. Also ask about him taking low-dose aspirin and fish oil capsules. That is inexpensive and supposed to help.
    Use it up, Wear it out,
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    Registered User Spirit Deer's Avatar
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    Look into the South Beach Diet books. Your library probably has them. It seems like that diet is tailor-made for diabetics because it's low carb yet healthy. But check with a dietician to make sure that's a good choice. I'm no expert.

    Insist on answers from your doctor. Call the clinic and ask to talk to his nurse. It's usually easier to get through to the nurse and you can get a lot of good answers from him or her. Prepare a list of questions to ask before you call, and keep your paper and pencil handy to make notes as you get the answers. It's easy to forget key points if you don't make notes.

    Check out reputable websites such as the web site for your local hospital, Mayo Clinic, Cleveland Clinic, American Heart Association, Center for Disease Control, American Diabetic Association, university hospitals, etc. You're more likely to get accurate info there than on some random website. There's a lot of bad info out there, so stick with names you can trust.

    Ask for a referral to a registered dietician or other professional who can help you figure out what he should be eating, when, how much, etc. For your appointment, arrive with a list of questions and also a record of what your husband has been eating for a week before the appointment. That will help the RD see exactly what he's doing right and wrong and offer suggestions to improve.

    I use a recumbent exercise bike and really like it. It's a lot more comfortable than the other type of bike because you don't have to lean over the handlebars to stay on it. It's more like just sitting in a chair and pedaling. I can knit or read or do other things while I bike, so it makes me more likely to do it. My particular bike has several different programs I can select, so I can vary the difficulty, or I can adjust the resistance on the fly myself if I want to. I bought mine several years ago from Overstock or Buy.com. It was sort of expensive but then so is a heart attack or stroke. I look at it as cheap health insurance. Mine uses magnetic resistance and I highly recommend it because it's quiet and shifts very, very smoothly. For any exercise equipment, be sure it's comfortable to use. For me, regular exercise bikes were instruments of torture and who wants to use something that hurts to use? Get the kind that the seat looks like a chair, not like a bike seat. Biking is great because it does not place stress on joints like walking or jogging does.

    Be sure your husband learns how to care for his condition himself, as well as you. It's ultimately his responsibility, not yours, and there will be many situations when he will need to know what decisions to make to best protect his health.

    Good luck. It's a scary diagnosis but there are ways to cope with it. Your best defense is knowledge, so you need good reliable info ASAP. Make your clinic provide that info.

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    Registered User mh3rdwheel's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone for your help, I do know a really good endocrinologist Dr. Feder she has been my daughters since she was 5, she is now 24. (DD treated for hypothyroidism).

    DH's doctor didn't say much, my sister has really bad I think Type 1 where she is on insulin and and insulin pump to try and control it. When she next comes down I will ask her to take DH's blood sugar.

    I went to the library and got all the cookbooks on diabetes, and a book from the ABA called the Diabetes Carbohydrate and Fat Gram Guide, I have been reading and now I am starting to understand, the food exchange part.

    I will look into exercise equipment especially the encumbent bike that you Spirit Deer mentioned. you all have been a tremendous help.

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