Purslane (Portulaca oleracea)
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  1. #1
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    Default Purslane (Portulaca oleracea)

    28 May 2012 Purslane (Portulaca oleracea) 28 May 2012 Purslane (Portulaca oleracea)
    A 8 by 8 foot garden area was prepares in the Spring, and nothing was planted in the area. After reviewing the situation, it was discovered that the area was well self-seeded with Purslane. The small weeds were hand removed.It was decided to allow this plant to grow and utilize is as a vegetable. Apparently it is most nutritional.I will use it mostly for juicing.
    10 August 2011 Purslane Cooked and Pressure Canned. 10 August 2011 Purslane Cooked and Pressure Canned.
    Durgan
    http://durgan.org/2011/ Garden Journal

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    I only found out last year that this is a weed. I love the flowers on it and had trouble finding it. I did find some this year.

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    Quote Originally Posted by craftypam View Post
    I only found out last year that this is a weed. I love the flowers on it and had trouble finding it. I did find some this year.
    Purslane is the most common weed in the world. No garden is without it, and it is impossible to eradicate. It is utilized as food in many parts of the world.
    Durgan
    http://durgan.org/2011/ Garden Journal

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    Registered User sabrelvssammy's Avatar
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    I have that trying to grow in all my garden paths. I say trying because I am bigger and I am winning!
    Thanks - never knew what it was called before.

    “After the last tree has been cut down, after the last river has been poisoned, after the last fish has been caught.
    Only then will you find that money can't be eaten.”

    ~ Cree Indian Prophecy










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    Andrew Zimmerman made a salad from it. He stated that in some countries it grows like a weed and is considered more of a pest. While in other countries it is considered fine culinary fare and that the meal he prepared and was right there eating would be very expensive at some of the finer restaurants but he just made it for free. He was on some island where it was growing and there was a citrus tree and the ocean had something like clams.

    Maybe I should try growing that instead of the spinach that is desperately trying to grow. Probably would have more luck with it.

    If anyone has eaten it, what does it takes like. And I will not believe you if you say chicken.

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    It's actually classified as a "superfood", one of the highest plant-based sources of omega-3. It has a pretty nice taste and texture too.

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    Depends when you harvest it. It is kind of crunchy, and can range from slightly salty to almost a little sour. It's a succulent, so it's pretty moist. Not unlike watercress. I quite like it. I've only ever eaten it raw, but it can apparently be thrown in stirfry as well. You can eat the whole plant (not sure about the roots), leaves and stems. Give it a try!

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    Quote Originally Posted by low-1 View Post
    Depends when you harvest it. It is kind of crunchy, and can range from slightly salty to almost a little sour. It's a succulent, so it's pretty moist. Not unlike watercress. I quite like it. I've only ever eaten it raw, but it can apparently be thrown in stirfry as well. You can eat the whole plant (not sure about the roots), leaves and stems. Give it a try!
    The whole plant gets used by my juicing method.
    10 August 2011 Purslane Cooked and Pressure Canned.
    Durgan
    http://durgan.org/2011/ Garden Journal

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    I have lots of purslane in my yard. One of my favorite sites is Eat The Weeds by Green Deane, the most watched forager in the world. He lives in FL and has great info on what is edible here and up north also. His videos are also on youtube.

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    Durgan I hate to disagree with you because you seem VERY KNOWLEDGEABLE about the gardening stuff; but I do not have any purslane growing anywhere in my yard. I really like the flowers and would definately know if I had it. I actually bought some; LOL

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    Quote Originally Posted by craftypam View Post
    Durgan I hate to disagree with you because you seem VERY KNOWLEDGEABLE about the gardening stuff; but I do not have any purslane growing anywhere in my yard. I really like the flowers and would definately know if I had it. I actually bought some; LOL
    I will send you mine - for FREE!!!! ~ lol

    “After the last tree has been cut down, after the last river has been poisoned, after the last fish has been caught.
    Only then will you find that money can't be eaten.”

    ~ Cree Indian Prophecy










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    Quote Originally Posted by craftypam View Post
    Durgan I hate to disagree with you because you seem VERY KNOWLEDGEABLE about the gardening stuff; but I do not have any purslane growing anywhere in my yard. I really like the flowers and would definately know if I had it. I actually bought some; LOL
    I don't think you can buy Purslane (Portulaca oleracea). The vendor would go broke. It is possible that you are mixing it up with Portulaca grandiflora. This is the beautiful flowering type commonly grown in a flower bed-not edible. I buy these and have a beautiful patch almost ready to bloom.

    I have very dry conditions now, no rain in May, and any bare earth has Portulaca oleracea sprouting as cheeky as can be.
    Durgan
    http://durgan.org/2011/ Garden Journal

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    They sell purslane here in FL. I have seen it at the garden center.

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    Quote Originally Posted by leighcat View Post
    They sell purslane here in FL. I have seen it at the garden center.
    The type I am discussing is food Purslane (Portulaca oleracea), not flowers. In fact, the flowers are so tiny on the Portulaca oleracea that they are seldom seen. The flowering type is sold everywhere, but not Portulaca oleracea. The sellers just put a sign up stating Portulaca. To distinguish that is why Latin names are used.
    Durgan
    http://durgan.org/2011/ Garden Journal

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    This is the kind that grows in my yard. Purslane: Omega 3 Fatty Weed | Eat The Weeds and other things, too Another link- Portulaca oleracea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia I think maybe they have flowers more often here because of the weather. PlantFiles: Detailed information on Purslane, Pigweed, Wild Portulaca, Little Hogweed, Pusley, Verdolaga Portulaca oleracea The ones in the store may have been a different type, I will have to look again. I am glad that you brought this up though because I never realized there were different types. I haven't eaten the purslane yet except for a tiny nibble. Thankfully mine is the edible type and grows all over my entire yard. Now that I have seen the flowering ones online, I want some for decoration!

    We also have a really need "weed" down the road called strangler's vine that I tried to grow but I think the seeds weren't ready yet. They look rather like big avacados but are related to milkweed. I would love to grow some just because they are so unusual.

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