Tips on Thawing Frozen Bread Products
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    Registered User Laurie in Bradenton's Avatar
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    Default Tips on Thawing Frozen Bread Products

    I've never been a fan of freezing bread products because I'm unsure how to thaw them so they are either hard or soggy.
    Looking for suggestions as I've been given a ton of bread products like hamburger/hot dogs and will need to freeze them to keep from losing them.

    Laurie in Bradenton

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    It's not necessarily how to thaw them, it's preparation for the freeze to prevent ice crystals from forming that's the trick....

    I make all our breads so everything is frozen and I don't have any of the problems you have noted. The best tip I have is to wrap everything tight - not leave it loose in the bags they are purchased in, and avoid as much air surrounding the food as possible.

    For whole (unsliced) loaves I wrap it tightly in plastic wrap and then in foil (which I use over and over until it falls apart). The close wrap of the plastic wrap aids in preventing the moisture from the crumb of the bread from migrating to the crust and that moisture eventually becomes ice crystals. It's those ice crystals that melts to make your bread soggy. The tight wrapping keeps the air from circulating around the bread.

    For "speciality" breads (like Dill Bread) we wouldn't use a whole loaf of at a time, I'll slice it when it's cool and tightly wrap 2-slices with plastic wrap and then place it in a plastic container in the freezer. Now we can quickly use 2 slices for a grilled sandwich.

    I also make all my own burger and hot dog buns and I wrap them individually in pop-up sheets of foil I get in a box of 500 from Sam's Club. Once again, the food item has a very close wrapping on it. Once wrapped in foil I can place them in a plastic container or a zip-lock bag. They thaw quickly on the counter or I can pop them in a toaster oven (frozen) to reheat, or split and butter them and toast on a grill. I use this same method with cut portions of cornbread and dinner rolls. I usually get two piece per sheet of foil.
    Last edited by Grainlady; 04-23-2009 at 11:35 AM.

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    Registered User joyofsix's Avatar
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    ??I just pitch them in the freezer and throw them on the counter to thaw. Could it be the FL temps and humidity?
    Mom to Emma, Spencer, Connor, Lily,Fletcher, Amelia and Adeline.

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    Registered User frugalfranny's Avatar
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    Thanks grainlady. It gave me some new ideas for freezing my bread. I always have to freeze some. Being only one it takes me awhile to use it. But I have never broken it down into such small units. Will try that.

    The only other thing I would add is keep the bread that will take the longest to use in a 'big' freezer. The freezer attached to my refer. is a frost free and is really hard (read ice crystals, freezer burn, etc.) on whatever is put in there. My big freezer isn't f.f. so stuff keeps for much longer. Plus with less 'activity' of getting into that freezer it doesn't have the chance for ice crystal build up.

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    I have found that if hamburg - hotdog buns are put in a freezerbag (keepthem in original bags) bag and all they do not get that hard dried out edges. I always drop them in freezer bags.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FRUGALFRANNY View Post
    Thanks grainlady. It gave me some new ideas for freezing my bread. I always have to freeze some. Being only one it takes me awhile to use it. But I have never broken it down into such small units. Will try that.

    The only other thing I would add is keep the bread that will take the longest to use in a 'big' freezer. The freezer attached to my refer. is a frost free and is really hard (read ice crystals, freezer burn, etc.) on whatever is put in there. My big freezer isn't f.f. so stuff keeps for much longer. Plus with less 'activity' of getting into that freezer it doesn't have the chance for ice crystal build up.
    Frugalfranny -

    If you happen to have Tupperware Square Rounds Storage Containers (I realize I'm old and not everyone even knows what I'm talking about - LOL), but they are the perfect size for most slices of bread - wrap and place the slices of bread in a Square Round. They also prevent air-flow because breads pack tightly into them, and offer insulation from the changing temperatures.

    If you have a FoodSaver (or other vacuum sealer) you can also wrap the slices in plastic wrap or place them in fold-top sandwich bags. Quick-freeze them until solid; then stack them and vacuum-seal in FoodSaver bags. That way you can extend that freezer storage time beyond the suggested 3-month period. The air-free environment will be beneficial. If you find your breads snap or crush, just partially vacuum-seal them, or vacuum-seal them while they are in a container.

    Here's the science... When you freeze foods that are not wrapped properly (what they call a butcher's wrap - double wrapped and nice and tight - water molecules migrate out of the food, which causes them to dry out. When water molecules migrate out of the food, then oxygen migrates in. Oxygen molecules will alter the color and taste - what we call freezer burn.

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