Raw food/Organic diet
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    Default Raw food/Organic diet

    Wondering if anyone has any great tips on how to switch over to a Raw/organic diet? I know it is fairly expensive...just wondering if anyone has any ideas on how to get started. Thanks

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    I wanted to mention this site.
    http://www.therawdivas.com/thepowderroom/
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    shop around and check the sale ads and definitely buy in season produce! that's what i do.
    But not all "organics" are created equal - so beware!
    Just because it says "organic tomatoes" in the pasta sauce, doesnt mean all ingredients are organic. The marketing can easily fool ya...

    You'll spend a little more over-all... but if we're just talking mostly produce here, look around and see when diff. stores have what you like on sale... and it's usually a pattern they set that you can count on. Otherwise, you can always ask the produce manager at the stores if they're aware of when the sales will go on.

    Also, talking to your produce manager about where the produce came from as well... just because it's organic doesnt mean its better for you because it came from the other side of the world - if you're concerned with the "global footprint"... but that's probly more info than yer looking for.

    Baby food on the other hand if labeled organic has to be guaranteed. So that's helpful.
    Other products that are canned/jarred/pre-packaged & state "organic" on the label - I'd re-read the label very carefully.
    And definitely try to get coupons for those products as well.

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    You might check the library for the book Traditional Foods Are Your Best Medicine by Ronald F. Schmid, N.D. Chapter 2 is about the benefits of raw foods. This includes eating raw meat. There's also more on raw foods in Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon with Mary G. Enig, Ph.D.

    Weston A. Price web site:
    http://westonaprice.org/search-resul...&sa=Search#947

    Just like any dietary changes, make small changes - your digestive system will thank you. You can develop a blockage from eating too much raw foods with lots of roughage in it when you're not accustomed to it. You'll need to learn to masticate your foods like you've never done before. You'll even learn how to "chew" raw juices before you swallow them. It will take you time to adjust and learn how to prepare these foods. Food preparation is sometimes complicated and time consuming. You'll also save money by growing your own foods and making your own sprouts. You may also need some additional "toys" in the kitchen that will aid in food preparation (food mill, food grinders, sprouting jars, Suribachi and Pestle, etc.

    For instance, I soak nuts (pecans, almonds, etc.) in lightly salted water overnight, which causes them to germinate, then I dehydrate them. This neutralizes the enzyme inhibitors that can irritate the mouth and cause digestive problems.

    Source: Food Enzymes for Health and Longevity - Edward Howell, M.D.

    "If you eat a substantial quantity of raw pecans, walnuts, Brazil nuts, filberts, or others, you have a choice of swallowing enzyme capsules with them to neutralize their enzyme inhibitors or first germinating the nuts and letting nature do the job through increased enzyme activity resulting from germination...." Dr. Howell was imbued with the idea of trying to avoid cooked food because of potential destructiveness of heat. He didn't think raw meat was suited for the human diet (although raw meat been used by traditional people throughout the ages), he depended on raw tree nuts in his diet as a protein source. It wasn't long before he had symptoms of "heavy sensation in the abdomen and feeling of extreme fullness and some nausea". This was brought on by consuming raw nuts. You won't have that problem if you soak and dehydrate them, or soak them and make nut milk from them.

    I incorporate more raw foods than most people, but found it wasn't realistic to become a raw-foodist for me. It's not an all or nothing for me. I always consider raw foods nature's original "FAST FOODS". So don't be surprised when one of my favorite lunches is cheese or kefir cheese (made from homemade kefir), celery, almonds and an apple.

    Some other books I used were:

    Recipes for Longer Life by Ann Wigmore
    The Sprouting Book by Ann Wigmore
    Sproutman's Kitchen Garden Cookbook by Steve Meyerowitz
    Recipes from the Sproutman by Steve Meyerowitz
    The Ayurvedic Cookbook by Amadea Morningstar with Urmila Desai
    Last edited by Grainlady; 02-12-2009 at 08:26 PM.

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    David Wolfe is a fun, raw foodist and has some decent books out there.

    I wanted to pipe in and say that you can find tons of raw-food cooking classes on youtube. Try searching feralfoods or David Wolfe.

    Sometimes they are more about philosophy of raw food, etc. so you may want to skip that or watch it depending upon your outlook.

    My cousin was a raw foods chef at the Tree of Life and she recommended just starting with a percentage of raw foods... for me, that was 25% (and i thought that was small, but still a dedication to eating raw veggies). I failed even doing that, but my cousin is healthy and doing great. She isn't totally raw, but eats mostly raw foods.

    good luck!

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    Grainlady, I totally want to have dinner at your place... yum

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    Quote Originally Posted by AdamantEve View Post
    Grainlady, I totally want to have dinner at your place... yum
    My hubby says the same thing!

    I guess I've studied the subject of food and food science a lot over the last 35 years. Fads come and fads go and I've picked the things that made sense for us for our diet based on a lot of information and trial and error.

    If you get too isolated or caught up in eating habits others don't understand and are far afield from "normal", you make people uncomfortable in social situations. "Well, I'd have you over for dinner but I have no idea what you'd eat...." kinda' thing! Nothing worse than being the only vegetarian at a bbq and bringing your own bean burger. We stayed with my husband's sister/husband when we were moving and a few days between homes. She was completely insulted when I brought butter and a loaf of sprouted bread for us to eat... But we refused to eat "looks like butter but is a chemical form of plastic" and "where's the nutrition" white bread!

    Isolating yourself from others was the lesson I learned when I went on the Macrobiotic diet. I didn't do well as a vegetarian (physically - I guess it's because humans are omnivores and soy should never be used as a food was the lesson for me there), but still have several vegetarian meals each week because it keeps food costs low and we don't need to consume large amounts of animal protein to stay healthy.

    Hubby will take a homemade goody to work to share with the fine folks there. He always says, "Don't ask what's in it - you don't want to know (I think that was when I was making homemade goat milk yogurt). Don't ask for the recipe, because you don't have the ingredients. And drink lots of water after eating it because it's full of fiber."

    Still want to come over???

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    Registered User AdamantEve's Avatar
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    Grainlady hehe, YES! I was a vegetarian for 13 years. I just got off the turnip-wagon (as I affectionately called it) 2 years ago and may go back. I worked at a macrobiotic restaurant when I was a teen. My cousin is a raw foods lady and my best friend and former roomie is a holistic health counselor. My mother put me on the candida diet when I was 9 years old. I also have a history of eating disorders which have cemented my "strange" eating habits. My friends and loved ones have made me the food guinea pig of the century and yes, I would absolutely love to eat at your house. If anyone gives you any slack about eating your wonderful foods you just invite me over- I promise to be the most appreciative eater at the table, lol! I'm trying to break my husband into alternative foods slowly, but I still have to eat quinoa by myself, hehe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AdamantEve View Post
    Grainlady hehe, YES! I was a vegetarian for 13 years. I just got off the turnip-wagon (as I affectionately called it) 2 years ago and may go back. I worked at a macrobiotic restaurant when I was a teen. My cousin is a raw foods lady and my best friend and former roomie is a holistic health counselor. My mother put me on the candida diet when I was 9 years old. I also have a history of eating disorders which have cemented my "strange" eating habits. My friends and loved ones have made me the food guinea pig of the century and yes, I would absolutely love to eat at your house. If anyone gives you any slack about eating your wonderful foods you just invite me over- I promise to be the most appreciative eater at the table, lol! I'm trying to break my husband into alternative foods slowly, but I still have to eat quinoa by myself, hehe.
    I envy you your practical experience and informed people around you. I've muddled through most of my stuff myself.

    Try this quinoa recipe on your hubby. Even my hubby ate it. He was raised by a brain-dead mother who fed him hamburgers everyday. I generally make 1/2 the recipe for the two of us.

    Breakfast Quinoa

    (source: The Splendid Grain by Rebecca Wood)

    Makes 3-3/4

    2 c. fresh orange juice (or reconstituted orange juice - I've also used apricot juice)
    1 t. ghee or sesame oil (I also use coconut oil or butter.)
    1 t. honey (I use agave nectar)
    1/8 t. sea salt
    1 c. imported quinoa or 1-1/3 c. domestic quinoa, well washed
    2 T. pecans, roasted and chopped very fine (I use a LOT more.)

    Combine the orange juice, ghee, honey, and salt in a medium saucepan over high heat and bring to a boil. Watch closely to keep the orange juice from boiling over. Add the quinoa, cover, lower the heat, and simmer for 12-15 minutes, or until all of the juice has been absorbed. Remove from the heat and let rest for 5 minutes. Add the pecans and fluff with a fork.

    Grainlady note: I don't add the pecans if I know there is going to be leftovers. They get a little soggy, so I just keep them to add as needed. Orange juice can get a little bitter when heated, so apricot juice is a good substitute for a less-bitter flavor.

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    Thanks for the quinoa recipe I'm going to try that out ASAP

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