Food or Appetite Fatigue
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    134
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    9

    Default Food or Appetite Fatigue

    Food or Appetite Fatigue

    Appetite or food fatigue is a real thing. Usually affects the old and very young.

    Starvation and Food Fatigue (also referenced as Appetite Fatigue) is not the same. One, Starvation is the lack of food, Food Fatigue is the presence of food but it would be the same rice day after day without any other flavors or textures.

    We didn't see too much of this here in America though the very poor are the exception. These people experience eating the same simple foods day in and out.

    Make a diet of beans and rice for 30 days and see how you feel about eating another bowl of beans and rice. This is breakfast, lunch and dinner.

    You won't be able to look at beans and rice one more time! I worked with a man, his wife is Russian. During the war they only had lintels to eat.. she can't even say the word with out wanting to throw up. If that is all you have to eat eventually you will not want to eat.

    Historically, it was discovered that people had stored lots of food but it was all the same.. and yet they were starving with stores of food. It just happened the stores of food was all the same thing, no variety.

    I bring this up because it is so important to menu plan, know what you are going to serve, make sure there is variety. If you look up food or appetite fatigue you will find many posts about chicken!

    http://www.courierpress.com/news/200...th-asian-wrap/

    **"Everyday chicken freshened up with Asian-inspired wrap

    The boneless, skinless chicken breast is suffering from some serious food fatigue.

    Sure, it has a well-earned reputation as the go-to ingredient for healthy, speedy eating. And for good reason. Chicken breasts cook quickly and easily, do well with just about any flavor or seasoning, and are virtually fat-free.

    But that's part of the problem. Flip through just about any food magazine and you'll likely be inundated by chicken breast recipes. It's all starting to feel a bit tired on the plate."**


    Beans can be made into burritos, soup, mock meat; meatloaf, burgers, sausage. But beans can be flavored using herbs and spices. Beans can be combined with other beans and made into 3 bean salad with a nice sweet vinegar dressing, and added to salad greens.

    Without recipes and other ingredients beans are just beans and one can sure get tired of eating the same thing day after day after day... food fatigue.

    I don't care if anyone takes this information and uses it or doesn't use it. I am not trying to talk anyone into varying their diets or adding other herbs and spices or rethinking their menu.

    I post this information as information to think about. I presented enough credible links with information about this subject for those that might be interested.

    Think about making a huge pot of your favorite meal... you have left overs. By day three what is your husband or kids saying? do we have to have that again?? now extend that same meal for a month, 2 months, 6 months, a year.

    All of this to say.. please make sure you have a variety of foods, flavors, and textures.

    Supporting links to follow

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    134
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    9

    Default

    Combat food rations

    The development of new combat food rations was started in 1996. The new food ration was developed and named in compliance with STANAG 2937 terminology as an individual CFR for the combined arms use. In 2002 the first batch of CFR was supplied for the Army of the Czech Republic. The CFRs are supplied in two versions and have got different main dishes. The CFR-Special is a modified CFR with different food components of higher energetic value and an extra set for the heating of food. The consumption is limited to 30 days maximum e.g. during the direct combat operation. Soldiers show so called „symptoms of food fatigue“ in case of long-time consumption of CFR.

    from: http://www.militaryfood.org/CzechArmyMilFood.html


    I found this paragraph interesting in that 30 days on the same foods, food fatigue began.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    134
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    9

    Default

    food fatigue in space

    FPS 64, Page 85

    Development of a ‘Gourmet’ Menu Items for Long-Term Manned Space Missions in an ALSS Environment Christopher M. Gregson and Tung-Ching Lee

    Department of Food Science, the Center for Advanced Food Technology and NJ-NSCORT.
    Rutgers University
    63 Dudley Road
    New Brunswick, New Jersey 08901, U.S.A.

    The quality of food in an Advanced Life Support System (ALSS) environment, especially on long-term space missions, is of major importance. In this psychologically stressful environment food-fatigue and nutrition are important considerations. As the diet must be based almost entirely on a small number of food crops and processing methods, devising desirable diets is challenging. The objective of this work was to produce ‘gourmet’ menu items using as few ingredients that cannot be produced from the ALSS crops as possible.

    A novel approach was used in this work by combining the techniques available from food science and approaches taken in the culinary arts. An initial study was made of the foods producible using the limited resources. Through nutritional tables, primary physical descriptors (color, texture etc.), professional culinary experience and knowledge of traditional food combination conventions, menu items were devised. These were assessed in terms of preparation time, level of skill required, practicality within the ALSS system and gastronomic quality.

    Suitable menu items can be devised using only the available resources with a small number of additions, e.g. salt. Flavoring ingredients, sweeteners and a small number of processing aids that cannot be made from the ALSS crops are essential to improve variety but must be transported from earth. The problems faced in providing a quality diet and ways in which solutions can be implemented by the astronauts are discussed by focusing in on particular examples.

    Whereas most previous studies have concentrated on the nutritional and practical aspects of food preparation within an ALSS environment, this study has shown that by combining knowledge from the culinary arts and food science, the quality of food provision can be significantly improved. The approach used in this study could be used to provide high-quality foods for diets from limited ingredients (e.g. vegetarian) on earth.



    FPS 69, Page 90

    Acceptability of Near-Vegan ALS Foods in a 30-Day Diet Study David Levitsky, Rupert Spies, Adriana P. Rovers, Ammar Olabi, and Jean B. Hunter

    Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University

    In order to evaluate the quality and system mass costs of plant based diets intended for bioregenerative life support systems, 225 foods based on ALS crops have been developed and tested for acceptability by panels of omnivores aged 30-55 years. Nearly all scored above 6 on a 9-point hedonic scale and the average acceptability was 6.9. The foods included breakfast items, salads, entrees, side dishes, beverages, desserts, soups and snacks.

    A subset of the above foods was re-tested in a short-term closed diet study . Sixteen free-living subjects, 9 women and 7 men from the earlier taste panel, consumed only foods provided by the study for a period of 30 days. The study was divided into three 10-day segments. In each segment the same foods were presented, but in different order. Subjects ate weekday breakfasts and lunches at the study site and carried away snacks and their weekend and evening meals, returning all leftovers to the study site.

    An individual’s satisfaction with a diet depends on the acceptability of the foods in the diet, the subject’s degree of adaptation to the diet, the degree of personal food choice allowed, the variety of foods in the diet, and sensory fatigue or boredom with individual foods. Our hypothesis was that subjects dissatisfied with the diet would reduce their food intake, find individual foods less acceptable, experience more

    negative mood states, and feel tempted to cheat on the diet.

    Subjects’ food intake was measured by weighing individual food dishes before and after meals. Energy intake was extrapolated from these measurements. Subjects rated each food for acceptability on a 9 point scale at each presentation. They were weighed 5x/week. The Profile of Mood Scores test was administered at intervals before, during and after the study. An exit interview with each subject covered dietary infractions and changes in physical activity, among other issues.

    This presentation will cover preliminary results of the study, and their significance to the BIO-Plex food system. The study has not been completed as of the abstract deadline.
    http://www.cognizantcommunication.co...sbs71abs2.html

  4. Remove Advertisements
    FrugalVillage.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    134
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    9

    Default

    81-Day Menu Crew Debrief – Crew Assessment of Food System and Food Choices A formal crew debrief was held for the 81-day menu. Three crewmembers (one male and two female) attended the debriefing. The general consensus of the crew was that the food system was very good. Some food fatigue was experienced
    toward the end of the test, especially toward the frozen food entrees. They would have preferred a menu that was a true 20-day cycle with fewer repeating food items.

    They would have preferred higher quality frozen food entrees. There were too many bean burritos and grilled cheese sandwiches. Overall, the crew followed the menu fairly closely, although they did make some changes. They did cook and prepare all items on the menu, but some substitutions were made by switching foods either to different times or to different days. One crewmember had a problem with low-fat entrees and felt they were not very tasty and required supplementation with butter.

    Some found themselves craving and using more salt than usual. Another member was concerned about the fat content of the menu and did not always eat according to the menu. Clearly these comments indicate that past eating habits influenced the
    crewmembers’ perception of the chamber food system.

    PDF
    http://lsda.jsc.nasa.gov/books/ground/4.4CrewFood.pdf

    *note... worth reading the entire article for information about foods and menu. Interesting.

  6. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    134
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    9

    Default

    so even an animal can get food fatigue!

    Food fatigue is a constant challenge for him (cat) in two ways. First, there is boredom. Of the brands of he can eat, there is but one brand he will eat, and of that few varieties he likes. We do our best to keep our eye out for new ones and to rotate the reliables.
    from: http://stateofthecat.wordpress.com/2...love-you-back/

  7. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    134
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    9

    Default

    I realize this is a lot of very dry reading, however, it is worth familiarizing yourself with this untalked about but very serious problem.

    I have found over the years, menu planning is a great way to avoid food/appetite fatigue.

    When all you have to survive what is stored in your pantry, variety is going to be more important then any of us can imagine.

    brook

  8. #7
    Master Dollar Stretcher madhen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    California
    Posts
    17,583
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Blog Entries
    427
    Rep Power
    94

    Default

    This is an interesting thread, Brook! I do OAMC, and I do find that when I cook something "new," I tend to crave it over the other items in my freezer. I'll eat that one thing for about a week, or until I've finished it off, then I'll have absolutely no desire again for it for quite a while, typically a couple of months.

  9. Similar Threads

    1. Frugal Fatigue
      By oheoh's momma in forum General Chat
      Replies: 24
      Last Post: 12-28-2011, 09:45 AM
    2. Sympathy/Support fatigue
      By ml2620 in forum General Chat
      Replies: 8
      Last Post: 08-05-2011, 07:08 PM
    3. Fibro & Fatigue CD-ROM
      By luvdietcoke in forum Freebies
      Replies: 0
      Last Post: 02-18-2008, 02:29 AM
    4. Appetite Management
      By Ellise in forum Health and beauty
      Replies: 0
      Last Post: 02-21-2003, 11:31 AM
    5. Lack of Appetite
      By paelthom in forum Health and beauty
      Replies: 8
      Last Post: 12-11-2002, 01:59 PM

    Tags for this Thread

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •