Food Storage Cans-Best place to order
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  1. #1
    Registered User bridge's Avatar
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    Default Food Storage Cans-Best place to order

    Has anyone done a cost comparison on where to order Food storage in cans (like honeyville)?

    I have found quite a few places online and was going to try to find the best prices including the shipping charge which seems to vary alot.

    I just thought if anyone had this info it would save me much time.

    I want to order theses canned foods to use as a stockpile and for day to day food. Does anyone else use them on a on-going day to day basis or just for long term?

    I am thinking it will save grocery dollars and trips to the store (which always add extra expense...cause you see/need something else when you get there). Reduce the amount of trash we have and be healthier for us. I will still get some fresh veggies from store or gardens in summer.
    Bridge
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  2. #2
    Registered User bridge's Avatar
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    Has anyone ever ordered from http://www.bulkfoods.com they seem to have good prices & $5 shipping on orders $75+.....not in cans. But I am thinking I could use glass jars to store it, since I will be using and not necessarily using for long-term storage.

    If it is in mylar bags and I wanted to later do long-term storage, could I but the bags in food grade buckets and they be OK?

    Sorry for so many questions, just trying to learn and be cost efficient.
    Last edited by bridge; 12-28-2009 at 11:09 AM. Reason: added
    Bridge
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    I order #10 cans from Honeyville Grain, Blue Chip Group, Pleasant Hill Grain, and Emergency Essentials. I watch for sales and look for the best buys, which means a lot of cost comparison - especially since it is ALL purchased within my $50/week food budget. Don't forget to figure shipping in the cost, which you've already found out varies a lot.

    You can often find these items discounted from Amazon.com (ironically from the same companies), so I always check there as well.

    I get e-mail notifications from Honeyville Grain when they offer specials - which involves using a code during your order to get the discount. I've purchased case-lots at 10% off, and also sales where everything was 10% off, just in the last few months.

    Blue Chip Group also has specials, and I check their web site for that information (www.bluechipgroup.net/). My last purchase of Morning Moo's Whey-Based Milk Substitute was buy one #10 can get one half-price. I use #10 cans for Emergency storage, and purchase it in a 24# bucket or split a 50# bag with a friend, when possible, because we use this product all the time. I have several years worth in storage because it's one of the "Seven Survival Foods" (grains, legumes, sprouting seeds, sweetener, salt, oil -coconut oil for me-, and powdered milk), which I keep several years of.

    Emergency Essentials always have something reduced and I check their catalog when it comes in the mail.

    It takes a lot of checking and running the calculator. If you find other budget-friendly sources, please let me know. We are now moving this type of food from our Emergency Foods (which is our 3rd level of food storage) to our pantry foods (our 2nd level of food storage), so I'm using them more, but also storing and using a much bigger variety than in years past.

    I generally find powdered whole eggs cheaper from Honeyville Grain. When fresh shell eggs are more expensive per egg than powdered (per egg), I'll use powdered eggs, and have done that for years. That's around 18-19 cents per egg this year, although I have some powdered whole eggs in storage that is .13 cents per egg (which would be $1.62/dozen for fresh shell eggs).

    I've used Morning Moo's Whey-Based Milk Substitute, as well as other brands of whey-products and dried milk products since 1981, rather than store-bought. It's always been less expensive than commercial liquid milk or non-fat dry milk powder from the grocery store. It also stores longer than powdered milk from the store.

    Bean/seed/grain sprouts are a good (inexpensive) source for fresh veggies in the winter (your garden in a jar), as well as leaf lettuce, spinach, and several herbs growing in a sunny window. I've grown cherry tomatoes indoors before. I also purchase onions, cabbage, carrots and celery, but they are also available in freeze-dried versions. Freeze-dried corn and peas are our favorites when it comes to taste, texture, and easy to use.

    Not sure if that answers your question...

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