Breadmaker Bread
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  1. #1
    Registered User Wendy99's Avatar
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    Default Breadmaker Bread

    Low on cash this week .. have breadmaker . going to put it to use. Bread goes bad because we dont use it fast enough and its humid. If I make bread and freeze it - should I slice it before freezing?

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    Registered User Debbie-cat's Avatar
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    I don't slice it before I freeze it as I find it dries out quickly.




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    Moderator mauimagic's Avatar
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    Looks like breadmakers are getting a lot of use now!! - or is this jut because I just got one!!

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    I slice before freezing, BUT it isn't frozen for long - maybe 5 days. It defrosts fine.

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    But depending on how many you are feeding......if you slice it, you can then take it out of the freezer a slice or two at a time and don't have to remove the whole loaf......even to slice it.

    If my fresh bread (store bought or home made) has sat on the counter for a couple days (and it is hot weather) and is in 'danger' of molding......I either freeze it, or put it in the refrigerator so it won't mold. But.....in refer. it has to be toasted when used or it IS dry.

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    The homemade bread never lasts long enough to mold or dry out.... ugh!!

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    Registered User Contrary Housewife's Avatar
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    During the summer I keep the bread in the fridge too. And always always wash hands before I open the bag. That may be hard to enforce with kids around.
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    Registered User Wendy99's Avatar
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    thank you all so much for the tips. we have 2 machines .. one i got at the good will for $5.00 it makes a mini loaf (really small, but really good), the other one is our 'big' one - thats the one that we dont always use up before it goes bad .. i'll prob be making a big loaf tomorrow. made a mini one tonight as it only takes 45min good for when your in a hurry!

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    You could just make dough like my DSIL. or rolls. Bake as needed.
    Last edited by frugalwarrior; 07-13-2009 at 03:01 AM.

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    Moderator mauimagic's Avatar
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    What does she do with the dough when it's made - freeze, refrigerate - remember I know nothing about this!! Sounds like a strong possiblity!!

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    1. To freeze a baked whole or half loaf, leave it unsliced. As Debbie-cat said, it drys out too quickly. Wrap the loaf tightly in plastic wrap and then in a layer of foil. Always wrap bread in a tight wrap to help prevent the moisture in the crumb of the bread from migrating through the crust and escaping into the air that surrounds it, and forming ice crystals.

    2. I also freeze slices of "speciality" breads (such as dill bread) that we use mainly for grilled sandwiches, rather than consuming a whole loaf at a time. I wrap 2-slices tightly in plastic wrap and then place in a tight-fitting plastic Tupperware (square-round) container or wrap a small stack of plastic-wrapped slices in foil. Slices need to be used quickly because they dry out fast. Wrapping the bread in 2-slice amounts means we can take out what we need for 1 sandwich. This method may also work if you find you don't use a loaf of bread quickly enough.

    3. I include ingredients that aid in keeping the bread fresher longer and helps prevent mold. I use agave nectar or honey instead of sugar. Both help keep bread fresher longer and are somewhat anti-microbial. Agave nectar and honey are both the best choice for breads that are going to be frozen.

    Coconut oil is another ingredient that aids in maintaining moistness of crumb and is also anti-microbial, to help prevent mold. This is another ingredient I add to all my yeast breads. I get my coconut oil from Wal-Mart (LouAna brand) in the same area where cooking oils are located. If you can't find coconut oil, use butter rather than cooking oil.

    4. Make dough in your bread machine, but bake it outside the bread machine in smaller loaves if you have a problem using a loaf before it goes stale or starts to mold. If your bread machine will make a 2-pound loaf, make that large amount of dough and bake it in two loaves in 7-1/2x3-1/2-inch loaf pans. I also have a Pullman Pan (a lidded pan that makes a crustless square loaf of sandwich bread) that makes a 1-pound loaf. If I use my 2-pound Pullman Pan, I'll cut the loaf in half or thirds and freeze what we can't use within a week.

    5. I personally don't find any benefit in freezing DOUGH over freezing baked loaves - and I make ALL our breads - but it's always an option - and if anything, bread making is ALL about options.

    Frozen dough has a shorter suggested freezer life than baked loaves/rolls. At any time, I have BAKED frozen whole or half loaves, burger/sandwich buns, hot-dog buns, dinner rolls, pecan cinnamon rolls, and slices of a speciality bread ALL in the freezer.

    To freeze dough:

    - Use honey (or agave nectar) as the sweetener in the dough. It helps keep the moisture in the dough better than when you use sugar. There's a lot of science supporting this choice of sweetener for freezing dough and baked breads.

    - Use ACTIVE DRY YEAST, rather than any of the fast-acting yeast products, which include: SAF-Instant, Bread Machine Yeast, Red Star Quick-Rise, or Fleischmann's Rapid-Rise. Fast-acting yeast products don't last as long in frozen dough as ACTIVE DRY YEAST.

    - Some freezer-specific recipes call for using double the amount of yeast to compensate for yeast that dies in the freezer. So if your freezer dough doesn't seem to rise well after it's thawed, it may not have enough yeast in it.

    - Because of the extra yeast in dough destined for the freezer, the first rise may go VERY quickly, so take the dough out of the bread machine as soon as kneading is done and allow it to rise in a dough-rising bucket (http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/...ing+bucket&gcl) to assure when "double" has occured. I never suggest rising dough in a bowl!!! It's one of the most inaccurate ways to judge when "double" has occured and a main cause of over-proofing or under-proofing dough.

    After your dough has gone through the first rise, punch down and form the dough into a dough log. Place it in a bread pan the size it's going to be used in, and cover it with a bag and place it in the coldest spot in your freezer. After it has completely frozen (5-10 hours), remove it from the pan and tightly wrap the dough log with plastic wrap, and then a layer of foil and place in a zip-lock bag. Dough can be frozen for up to 4 weeks. If you make freezer dinner rolls, use them within 2-weeks.

    - Remove a loaf from the freezer and thaw it overnight, in the plastic wrap, in the refrigerator. When thawed, place it in a greased pan, cover with plastic wrap (just use the same sheet that the dough was originally wrapped in), and rise at room temperature per usual.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Contrary Housewife View Post
    During the summer I keep the bread in the fridge too. And always always wash hands before I open the bag. That may be hard to enforce with kids around.
    FYI - Refrigerating bread is the fastest way for bread to stale and the worst place to store it. Refrigeration may temporarily prevent mold growth, but so does the ingredients used to make the bread, and storage methods.

    The #1 cause of mold is reusing a plastic bread bag that hasn't been properly sanitized and cleaned. It already contains mold spores, as does an envoriment like a bread box if it's not properly cleaned and sanitized after each use.

    I've had this taught to me in every breadmaking class I've taken over the last 30 years. I spend an inordinate amount of time teaching the science behind staling in my bread classes.

    In one test, bread stored at 46°F (most refrigerators SHOULD be around 40°F or colder, but usually aren't) staled as much in ONE day as bread held at 86°F did in SIX days.

    Because the refrigerator is a very dry environment due to the frost-free feature, the moisture is quickly drawn out of the bread and retrodradation of amylopectin (staling) occurs more rapidly.

    If you DO refrigerate bread, expect a considerable firming of the crumb and loss of flavor, and I'd also suggest using it QUICKLY.

    Refrigerating a fresh loaf of UNsliced bread is a trick people use to firm the crumb to make it easier to slice, especially if you need really thin slices, but it's just a short storage time for this slicing method and the bread is consumed a.s.a.p.
    Last edited by Grainlady; 07-13-2009 at 11:06 AM.

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    I make french bread dough (no sugar or fat) for 1# loaves in the machine and bake it in a small loaf pan. I do slice it before freezing and just take out as much as I need. Never had a problem with it drying out, probably because I make it a little "wetter" than the recipe says. And I use an instant-read thermometer, the kind made for roasts, with a cable to the sensor that reads on a unit outside the oven, KWIM? 190 - 200 degrees F is done.

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    Moderator mauimagic's Avatar
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    Mahalo for all this great information!!

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    Registered User savvy_sniper's Avatar
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    OH Grainlady! I used Louana Coconut Oil and honey in my bread recipe instead of vegetable oil and brown suger. The bread is wonderful! I can't wait until hubby tries it.

    Thank you so much! I read all your posts regarding bread and grain. I have learned so much.

    Quote Originally Posted by Grainlady View Post
    3. I include ingredients that aid in keeping the bread fresher longer and helps prevent mold. I use agave nectar or honey instead of sugar. Both help keep bread fresher longer and are somewhat anti-microbial. Agave nectar and honey are both the best choice for breads that are going to be frozen.

    Coconut oil is another ingredient that aids in maintaining moistness of crumb and is also anti-microbial, to help prevent mold. This is another ingredient I add to all my yeast breads. I get my coconut oil from Wal-Mart (LouAna brand) in the same area where cooking oils are located. If you can't find coconut oil, use butter rather than cooking oil.

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