Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana)
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    Default Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana)

    Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana)
    http://www.durgan.org/ShortURL/?WCQJP 19 July 2008 Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana)

    One of my two horseradish plants was dug today to make horseradish condiment. The roots are scaled and cleaned with a steel wool scrubber and blended with vinegar to the desired texture, and stored in small jars.

    I used 250 ml jars, but it is probably better stored in 125ml jars, since oxidization occurs every time a jar is opened, and the colour changes from the pristine white to a dull white over time. Total time 4 hours.

    I have since learned that putting a layer of olive oil in the jar on top of the horseradish prevents oxidization, when using at the table. The horseradish is dug out with a small spoon keeping the olive oil present. A bit more oil can be added if too much is lost.

    There is still a few 125 ml jars from 2007, and it is still in pristine condition

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    Nice! I love eating horseradish that way.

    What kind of soil does it need in order to grow well? I recall carrots having a hard time around here, so I figure other taproots would fare the same.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Squirt View Post
    Nice! I love eating horseradish that way.

    What kind of soil does it need in order to grow well? I recall carrots having a hard time around here, so I figure other taproots would fare the same.
    Horseradish will grow anywhere, but will thrive in relatively loose soil. I have grown it in hard clay, but, but, one has to dig those snake-like roots out, and it is no easy chore in hard clay- for that matter in any soil. One plant makes a lot of horseradish., and any root left in th ground will sprout.

    Carrots can be grown with a bit of effort in most soils. When I first took over this property, the previous owner told me he could not grow carrots due to the heavy clay soil. I selected a four by four foot area and strained the soil to about a foot depth using a half inch mesh on the wheelbarrow, then area planted. The carrots were abundant and excellent quality. The same procedure is applicable for beets, but it is not necessary to go so deep.

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    Where do you process yours? When we had a patch and did ours, we did it outdoors at the picnic table with a food processor. The year we did it inside had us crying like mad, lol.
    Enjoy your loot!




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    Quote Originally Posted by Darlene View Post
    Where do you process yours? When we had a patch and did ours, we did it outdoors at the picnic table with a food processor. The year we did it inside had us crying like mad, lol.
    Enjoy your loot!
    I process indoors sometimes, and find it no more nasty than peeling and cutting a bunch of onions. If the weather is nice, I process on the deck. There is only a couple of blender's full of material.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Durgan View Post
    Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana)
    http://www.durgan.org/ShortURL/?WCQJP 19 July 2008 Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana)

    One of my two horseradish plants was dug today to make horseradish condiment. The roots are scaled and cleaned with a steel wool scrubber and blended with vinegar to the desired texture, and stored in small jars.

    I used 250 ml jars, but it is probably better stored in 125ml jars, since oxidization occurs every time a jar is opened, and the colour changes from the pristine white to a dull white over time. Total time 4 hours.

    I have since learned that putting a layer of olive oil in the jar on top of the horseradish prevents oxidization, when using at the table. The horseradish is dug out with a small spoon keeping the olive oil present. A bit more oil can be added if too much is lost.

    There is still a few 125 ml jars from 2007, and it is still in pristine condition

    do you grate your horseradish before adding the vinegar? what consistency should it be like?

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    Registered User missyali's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info. I should be getting on our lone plant soon. If I leave part of the root system in tact, it will sprout more next year?

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    Consistency is determined by the quantity of vinegar added to the blender. Consistencay is subjective, I like mine a bit coarse in texture. All chopping is done by the blender blades. If too much vinegar has been added strain the excess using the colander. The white residue is placed back into the chopped horseradis before placing in the jars. This white residue settles to the bottom of the vinegar when poured off. The whole process is very simple and takes little time.

    My horseradish plant is treated as an annual. I start a new plant in a pot from a healthy looking root about four inches long, and when I feel it is large enough, I plant it in the Fall (October) and let it do its thing. They survive Winter weather with no problem in my Zone 5.

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