American Take on Japanese Sukiyaki
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  1. #1
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    Default American Take on Japanese Sukiyaki

    When i was young, we lived in Japan. Our Japanese housekeeper used to fix this. Basically,sukiyaki is the Japanese form of stew. Story has it that many years ago, an American missionary was describing stew to his Japanese houseboy and sukiyaki is what they ended up with. This is what I'm having tonight. It really stretches a steak.

    Ingredients: steak/beef, green peppers, onions, cabbage, bean sprouts, soy sauce with a little sugar. A VERY big skillet. I use my electric skillet.

    I have a sirloin in freezer that was too tough to eat plain. I'm going to partially thaw it and then slice it very, very thin in strips. I'll throw on some meat tenderizer, let it come to room temp.

    Slice 1-2 onions and 1-2 bell peppers in thin strips. Slice about half of a small head of green cabbage in thin strips. Drain and rinse one can of bean sprouts. Everything needs to be thin.

    In the skillet with just a dab of oil, put the pile of meat right in the center. Then put the other veggies in around the meat - all in their own piles. Don't mix them up. You will have a giant skillet full of stuff, but it's going to cook down. Mix some soy sauce - maybe half cup? with just a tad of sugar and same amount of water and pour over. Start cooking on about medium heat. As it cooks, turn things over while keeping them in their own piles as much as possible. (Don't ask me why. Just the way she did it). You may need to add more soy sauce/water/sugar as you go. You want to end up with a real thin sauce. It only takes a few minutes to cook this.
    Serve over steamed white (my preference) or brown rice. It gets all mixed up in the bowl so why it's kept in individual piles is beyond me.

    Try it...you might like it.

  2. #2
    Registered User Spirit Deer's Avatar
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    Thanks! That sounds like something that begs for modification, and something we'd like that can have a ton of veggies in it.

    Sometimes methods are done a certain way just because that's how the person doing it prefers it, not for any practical reason.

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    One modification you'll want to make is low sodium soy sauce. I used regular last time and felt it the next day.

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  5. #4
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    Low sodium soy sauce? No, I don't think so. I'll probably change the ratio so there's more water to soy sauce, or use broth instead of water for a little extra flavor. Adding a little sesame oil wouldn't hurt either.

    Some foods I just can't make the change to. Low sodium soy sauce is one of them.

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