crockpot chicken texture
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  1. #1
    Registered User mek42's Avatar
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    Default crockpot chicken texture

    I do not like the texture of our crockpot chicken. It feels like dry pulled pork (comparing to store bought tubs of pulled pork which are not in our menu anymore). Are we doing something wrong or do I just not like the texture of crockpot chicken?

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    Registered User ms.mel.who's Avatar
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    I agree. I usually cook my chicken another way then add in to my crockpot recipies. For example I will bake or grill split chicken breast, let them cool, then pull them apart to add into my white chicken chilli.

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    Moderator nuisance26's Avatar
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    ~Are you buying chicken that has been treated with a solution? I discovered that chicken from Aldi(which has a solution)has an awful texture when cooked in the crockpot. I stopped buying it years ago. I only buy untreated chicken and it always turns out soft and moist.~

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    Registered User Libby's Avatar
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    nuisance - Out of curiosity - does it actually say its treated? How is it worded on the packaging. I 'think' I'm buying regular 'natural' chicken right now.

    mek - how are you cooking it in the crockpot? Rotisserie style - there's a recipe here in the village cookbook

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    Registered User Contrary Housewife's Avatar
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    Dry meat usually means it's been over cooked. Try cooking it less next time. Check on it once an hour until is done.
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    Registered User IntlMom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Contrary Housewife View Post
    Dry meat usually means it's been over cooked. Try cooking it less next time. Check on it once an hour until is done.
    yep, what she said...... also a sauce of some kind does brilliantly to keep it all moist and yummy

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    Moderator nuisance26's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Libby View Post
    nuisance - Out of curiosity - does it actually say its treated? How is it worded on the packaging. I 'think' I'm buying regular 'natural' chicken right now.
    ~Yes, it will say(and probably in small writing)10%(or more!) solution added. The solution is a salty brine of some kind. I think it ruins the flavor and texture of the meat and it just a way for the companies to charge meat prices for selling you water. Walmart's "natural" chicken is treated so don't trust the word natural: http://walmartwatch.com/blog/archive...tural_chicken/ ~

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    Registered User lisaflex's Avatar
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    agree. the rotissiere is awesome!!!

    also, you can opt to do it in the oven SLOWLY at about 225. then broil to toast skin if desired for about 10 minutes after it is fork tender.

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    Registered User mek42's Avatar
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    Even when we do it completely submerged in sauce / liquid it comes out the same way. Will look for the rotisserie recipe later. Thanks!

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    Registered User lisaflex's Avatar
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    sometimes it is the crockpot itself...they are all different. i would try cooking it less....even if you are turning it to warm, it may still be "cooking"

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    Registered User ttistin's Avatar
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    I found that if I put the chicken in frozen, cover it with say a cream of ? soup and cook it on low it comes out nice. The trick with chicken is to cook it nice and slow but not to long. Cook it maybe an hour + less then you normally would and check it to make sure it is done.

    I agree with the chicken at Aldi's, it is fine for some things but I do not like it in the crockpot.

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    I think that many crockpot recipes for chicken have much too long cooking times, especially if you prefer breasts. Thighs and drumsticks will hold up a bit longer, but I think 4 to 6 hours is about all most chicken can take in the crockpot. Even if it's covered with liquid, it tends to lose all its juices and just taste flat - I make chicken broth in the stockpot all the time, and I'll throw in some meaty pieces with the bones to make poached chicken. if I don't take it out in time, it is tasteless, because all the juices cook out.

    Try thighs instead of breasts and definitely reduce the time. I do not cook chicken on days I am gone to work all day.

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    Registered User Luckybustert's Avatar
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    I was just reading about this very thing last night in a slow cooker cookbook. It said this happens when you overcook meat in a slow cooker. It also said that many times a recipe will say 6 to 8 hours but people will stretch it to 10 to 12 (starting it before you commute to work, work for 9 hours, then commute home, etc.) and the meat is overcooked and dry as a result. If it had only been cooked 6 to 8 hours, this wouldn't have been a problem. So I guess the important point is to take the cooking times in slow cooker recipes seriously.....it's not something you can just forget about and get back to it whenever you feel like it if you want the quality of the food to be at it's best.

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