How to be more frugal (without seeming like a cheapskate)
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  1. #1
    Registered User Contrary Housewife's Avatar
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    Default How to be more frugal (without seeming like a cheapskate)

    "Frugal people still enjoy spending money. They just want to maximize that money to reduce stress."


    https://www.vox.com/the-highlight/20...apskate-frugal
    Stop trying to organize all of your family’s crap. If organization worked for you, you’d have rocked it by now. It’s time to ditch stuff and de-crapify your world.

    If you're not using the stuff in your home, get rid of it. You're not going to start using it more by shoving it into a closet.

    Use it up, Wear it out,
    Make it do, Or do without. ~unknown

    A clean house is a sign of a wasted life. ~unknown

  2. #2
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    Good article.
    I agree that frugality is about "exercising your savings muscle" and maximizing the value of a purchase.

  3. #3
    Registered User KathyB's Avatar
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    It is interesting that at the end they talk about having to turn down invitations to get together with friends because of the money costs.

    Is it common for most people that socializing with friends seems to revolve around going out somewhere together? We generally just invite friends over to our house. I remember when I was younger. It was generally hanging out at a friends house or inviting friends over to our house.

    I think this is something that is not talked about much. Does being frugal mean cutting back on your social life? In theory you could invite people over or go to some free local event. But if everyone in your group only gets together to go out to eat or someplace that eats up money....it can be difficult.

    When I was in my 20s my husband and I were pretty poor and so were our friends. We would invite them over and serve really cheap food. We were 20 somethings drinking Kool-Aid since it was cheaper than soda. And everyone understood. They did not look down on us since they were just as strapped for money as us. But it seems now like even people who do not have much money are still going out together instead of doing cheap things.

    Are there still people doing the friends equivalent of cheap dates? I remember 5 or 6 of us gathered around the TV to watch movies from the discount movie rental place.
    KathyB

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  5. #4
    Registered User Contrary Housewife's Avatar
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    I have two different groups of friends with whom we do potluck dinners at least once a month. It's not about the money, it's more about the sharing and social aspect of the gathering. People at all income levels from struggling 20-30 year olds to fairly well off mid-life folks to retired and elderly, bring what they can and nobody is required to bring anything at all. We talk, hang out, sometimes play games or watch movies, or listen to music and chill. Maybe I just have weird friends, but I don't think so.

    I do know a lot of people who don't cook, don't entertain, and don't want to put forth the effort. It's much easier to say "Let's meet at ______" than it is to clean the apartment. We stopped entertaining at home for two reasons. One, our space is really small and it's a tight squeeze to get 4 chairs in the kitchen (we have no dining room). Two, the people we were having over regularly never reciprocated. I got tired of being the only one who would cook.

    And believe it or not, there's a number of people who are squeamish about eating food prepared in someone else's kitchen, yet have no trouble going to a restaurant. I've actually had a couple of people turn down my home cooked dinners, which is awkward on both sides.

    If your friends only get together to go out to eat, what kind of friends are they? What do you have in common besides eating? Why aren't you doing that instead?
    Stop trying to organize all of your family’s crap. If organization worked for you, you’d have rocked it by now. It’s time to ditch stuff and de-crapify your world.

    If you're not using the stuff in your home, get rid of it. You're not going to start using it more by shoving it into a closet.

    Use it up, Wear it out,
    Make it do, Or do without. ~unknown

    A clean house is a sign of a wasted life. ~unknown

  6. #5
    Registered User MaryinFL's Avatar
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    I don't think the younger generation, Im almost 60, are as frugal as we used to be when I was their age.
    One of my daughter in laws friends just threw a baby shower for her, at a pricey restaurant. This was unheard of when I was younger.
    My son is pretty frugal, my daughter in law isn't, except when other people aren't looking. She has a keep up with the Jones mentality.
    Its the same with birthdays, eat at pricey restaurants. I don't understand the mentality of spending money for gatherings that we used to enjoy having at home.
    I did get a kick out of my son saying he would never go to the restaurant again after he saw that they charged him $2 extra because he asked for a tablespoon of sour cream for him, his wife, and their son. $6 is not much, but he said I could have bought a gallon of sour cream for that price.

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