Not frugal related, but I just had a question for those of you who live in Canada
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  1. #1
    Registered User Iansmommy's Avatar
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    Question Not frugal related, but I just had a question for those of you who live in Canada

    What do Canadians think of Americans? I have always found it interesting to learn how other parts of the world feel about Americans in general.

    I live in Washington state, but have never travelled to Canada. From what I have seen, I don't perceive us as being that different. I almost see us as being an extension of one another.

    I would love to travel to Canada someday. Any recommendations of which cities would be the best to visit?

    Thanks
    Leah

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    I can't speak for other Canadians, however I don't see Americans has much different EXCEPT Canadians are VERY laid back and we always say heh.

    I think too Canadians are more savers than Americans.

    Otherwise you and I are the same, at least to me.

    Cities to see:
    Winnipeg
    Toronto
    Edmonton
    Ottawa
    Vancouver
    Montreal
    Saskatoon

    And the east coast provinces.

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    Registered User MomToTwoBoys's Avatar
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    I was born in the US and lived there up until the end of 2002. I now reside in Canada. It's definitely been different being here and seeing how each side of the border views the other side.

    Back when Bush was re-elected, people were scratching their heads and wondering how it happened. Canadians are actually pretty interested in what the US does and handles things because a lot of what the US does directly affects Canada. I guess my viewpoint of Americans is a bit askewed because I was born and raised there, but it definitely has changed a lot since I've been here. You see things a lot differently when you're in Canada than you do when you're in the US.

    There are many things that Canadians see as being odd, but it's not something they're going to turn up their noses at Americans about.

    If you're going to visit some cities in Canada, you should go check out Calgary and Edmonton. Edmonton's a bit dirtier than Calgary but Calgary also has a lot of problems of their own. I love Calgary to death and don't think I'd live anywheres else. I would highly suggest going to Banff and Lake Louise and Jasper. The Canadian Rockies are so incredibly beautiful. I've been to Toronto and I wouldn't go back. If you're into arts and theatre, check out Montreal. Vancouver's pretty laid back.

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    Registered User Debbie-cat's Avatar
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    I have travelled the Canadian Rockies for the last 25 years. I LOVE them. I love Lake Louise, Banff, Jasper, Kelowna, Salmon Arm and the Athabasca Glacier! I liked Edmonton...Calgary I liked as well but found the roads hard to read and follow???? Probably just me on a bad day!

    Three Valley Gap, Kamloops, Hinton are places I would LOVE to live. There you are out in the wild.

    I was born and raised in Canada and I am a Canadian. I moved to the United States this past year - May 08. I always lived on a border town and found there are many differences betweeen Canadians and Americans. Americans are more vocally patriotic. Canadians are patriotic in a quiet sort of way. ( I DON'T MEAN ANY DISRESPECT TO ANY AMERICAN!!!! PLEASE!!!) I will always be a Canadian. That will never change. I LOVE Canada. We may not be a strong nation but that also doesn't mean we are weak. Our close connection to the U.S. encourages us to like the States and we do.....BUT we are our own nation and will remain that way. I LOVE my country and will fight for it to the end.

    We encourage individuality and embrace it. This is something the States will never do. I am a history teacher and KNOW that America is a melting pot...Canada is a multicultural nation. The difference is..... melting pot....everyone melts into the American ideal.....Multicultural nation...everyone embraces their own culture without reprimand.

    I DO NOT mean this to be a political statement. I only express what I have seen living in both countries. I love the States and while I live here will fight to the end....but my heart belongs in Canada.




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    Registered User mommy4ever's Avatar
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    As a Canadian, I can say I love my neighbors. Like the one poster said, there are things that make me go hmmmmm. But that's a fact of life. I do that with my kids, my friends, and parents. I don't always know where everyone is coming from. And I won't always agree, but it doesn't mean a lack of respect.

    The US, I'd say is like a cousin to Canada. Completely independant of each other, but completely linked to each other, work better as a team, than as opponents.

    As individuals, I don't think there's much difference between us. We don't often voice our patriotism but we're proud to be Canadian(have you seen our beer commercials?), but we are patriotic, just in a different way. We're very laid back as a whole, and poke fun at ourselves often.

    USA is a great neighbor and ally!

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    Registered User PrairieGirl's Avatar
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    I've been treated pretty poorly at the border, trying to enter the US so my views on the country as a whole are rather poor. I've met some wonderful people from the US and have travelled the US a bit (and plan to again), but as a whole, the country just rubs me the wrong way (no offense to any Americans, I'm just being honest). I will say though, that a lot of what I don't like about the US has to do with the governments that are elected and the whole idea that y'all are better than eveyrone else (yes, I know, not every one shares that view but again, its just my perception).

    Anywho, if you do want to come for a visit, go check out:

    -Ottawa
    -old Montreal and Quebec City
    -Newfoundland
    -the Rockies in BC and Alberta (Jasper, Lake Louise, Fernie, Kelowna, etc.)
    -the West Coast

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    Registered User sabrelvssammy's Avatar
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    i was at a convention this past summer and sat with a canadian one day at lunch and said "so...on a whole..what do the canadians think of us americans..." his response:

    well, we pretty much look at you guys like our cousins...you aren't really all that much different except that you have to get into the middle of everything that's going on in the world and then that tends to put us on edge...and most of the time you are doing it for purely selfish reasons... take the war...you claim that you are over there because of the 'otrocities' against the people and that you must help them...but where are you when it comes to the rest of the world? the otrocities are happening all over the planet...but you have taken on this one because ??? well we know why...it's because of the oil... so that makes it a 'purely selfish' reason..."

    i got to thinking about this and it did make some sense...but remember..that's just one guys take on the whole senario...i don't know how ALL canadians think about us...but i think of them no different FROM us.... to me canada may as well be florida or ohio...but then again..i think of NOONE any different than us...we are all on this sinking ship together....my mom once told me that we all put our pants on one leg at a time and when we bleed...we all bleed the same color...red....

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    I'm American, but I've been here in Canada sinc eI was 4.

    there are lots of 'stupid american...' stereotypes of course. can't name any off the top of my head. but then from living up here and there I see both sides of the picture. some of my cousins have asked me the stereotypical 'stupid american' questions... do we have flush toilets, tv, radios, running water. do we have to use dog sleds and live in igloos....

    if you come up the rockies are fantastic. i live in Calgary. as long as you have a map and an ok sense of direction you're good. the mountains are WEST. as soon as I leave the mountains I'm lost for directions. lol.

    Calgary, Banff, Lake Louise, Jasper....into BC and the mountain resorts. Banff National Park....are all outstanding to visit. I feel lucky living here.

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    I married an American, who later became Canadian. His American relatives largely ostracized him from the family for being 'unpatriotic'. DH came up with his parents when he was 16. His mother was a pacifist during Vietnam...and had four sons...2 of whom served and one with grand mal the army wanted to draft. You bet she headed for the Canadian border!

    When I was a kid and went with a group of Girl Guides to Wyoming, we met some Boy Scouts from the southern US. We had an ex-American girl with us and she was leading them on terribly about living in igloos and taking dog sleds to school every day. Most Canadians would be too polite to tease anyone like that. But this girl absolutely relished in these boys lapping it up. The rest of us were in stunned amazement the Americans knew so little about Canada and actually believed her! So good on you for posting and asking!

    One of the things about Americans that strikes me as odd is their fascination with Hollywood. It just seems...weird. I can't speak for most Canadians, but I for one feel very sorry for the Hollywood celebrities having their lives viewed so microscopically. To me that is a real intrusion of privacy. Not polite...

    Places to see? I'd say...the Rockies, Cape Breton Island, Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island, Ottawa, Quebec City, Winnipeg (lots of cheap/free entertainment), Regina (city of festivals and music), Calgary, Kelowna area, Vancouver, and Victoria (which is very British). If you have time, I'd swing up to Yellowknife or Whitehorse to see what the real north is like.

  11. #10
    Registered User MomToTwoBoys's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peanut View Post
    I married an American, who later became Canadian. His American relatives largely ostracized him from the family for being 'unpatriotic'. DH came up with his parents when he was 16. His mother was a pacifist during Vietnam...and had four sons...2 of whom served and one with grand mal the army wanted to draft. You bet she headed for the Canadian border!

    When I was a kid and went with a group of Girl Guides to Wyoming, we met some Boy Scouts from the southern US. We had an ex-American girl with us and she was leading them on terribly about living in igloos and taking dog sleds to school every day. Most Canadians would be too polite to tease anyone like that. But this girl absolutely relished in these boys lapping it up. The rest of us were in stunned amazement the Americans knew so little about Canada and actually believed her! So good on you for posting and asking!

    One of the things about Americans that strikes me as odd is their fascination with Hollywood. It just seems...weird. I can't speak for most Canadians, but I for one feel very sorry for the Hollywood celebrities having their lives viewed so microscopically. To me that is a real intrusion of privacy. Not polite...

    Places to see? I'd say...the Rockies, Cape Breton Island, Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island, Ottawa, Quebec City, Winnipeg (lots of cheap/free entertainment), Regina (city of festivals and music), Calgary, Kelowna area, Vancouver, and Victoria (which is very British). If you have time, I'd swing up to Yellowknife or Whitehorse to see what the real north is like.
    Your comment about being fascinated with Hollywood kind of stood out with me. DH always wondered why I was so in awe of all these celebrities and figured that it was an American thing. Up here, they're just regarded as everyone else. The only thing special is that they do something on a larger scale than everyone else. They're normal people but are put into such a large spotlight that they really don't get too much privacy. When Michelle Williams and Heath Ledger were here for filming Brokeback Mountain, they went shopping at Costco and everything. I saw one small blurb about it in the paper and was like, "Oh that's neat!". I have to say that my fascination with most of Hollywood stuff went away as I stayed here longer. Even when Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie were in Edmonton for the filming of one of his movies, you know the majority of journalists were from the US? It's crazy!

    As far as the war and stuff is concerned, Canadians are more concerned with what's going on inside their own borders than the US is. I was in the Marine Corps for over four years and it's just drastic how each country's military views really are. Don't get me wrong; I loved my job. To me, it was another job. It wasn't anything dealing with killing someone or going into another country and running things based on what your ideals are. It was just me there, supporting my co-workers when they had to do something that someone else told them to do. The war coverage here is vastly different than the war coverage in the US, especially on the news networks. Canadians take it a whole lot harder when they lose a member of their armed forces in battle, especially with the elected officials in Canadian Parliament. They'd sooner have brought them home, but the US made them feel like they weren't pulling their weight in the "war on terror". To my recollection, all the Canadian Forces is is a peacekeeping military setup.

    I can also relate to the "stupid Americans" thing and the whole realization that not a lot of Americans know a thing about Canada. Ask most of them what the capital of Canada is and they'll tell you Toronto. I'm like 'errrr...' and this is even people in my home state of New York.

    As far as I am concerned, I am Amerinadian. Would I go back to the US? Nope. Maybe to vacation in North Carolina or Florida but that's about it.

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    You know, another thing you might like to know about Canada. the home of the RCMP (Royal Canadian Mounted Police) is in Regina. They have tours of the Depot (where they train), a sunset ceremony in summer, and a big new museum on RCMP history.

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    I can't believe I'm the only Canadian who has mentioned Winnipeg. It's a beautiful city, just not one to live in.

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    Registered User champagnium's Avatar
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    I HAD to chime in here....lol...I live in Halifax, Nova Scotia,and I spent 5 years working for the city with Cruis ship passengers and I have to say I think the main difference is we are more polite to each other, we know a lot more about the US than they do about us (no, that's not England across the Harbour..it's Dartmouth...and no, my dad isn't a fisherman, and I don't live in a house on stiltz) both geographically and pol;itically, as well as more accepting. As others said, we're patriotic, just quieter about it. I've travelled extensively in the US, been to Europe and father, and as much as I love travelling, I never want to live anywhere but Nova Scotia
    If you get to this side, definintly try to make time

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    Quote Originally Posted by homesteadmamma View Post
    I can't believe I'm the only Canadian who has mentioned Winnipeg. It's a beautiful city, just not one to live in.
    Hey! I mentioned Winnipeg too! LOL DH and I had a wonderful week there last June. It was very affordable. Less than $1000CAD for a week in a B&B, meals, and museums/entertainment. Lots to do for free/cheap. And great shopping! That was the other $1000CAD I spent. Mind you, most of it was planned ahead of time. I was going to Winnipeg for a reason...

    Their downtown library is cool. There's an art gallery, a coffee shop, a store.

    They have a craft museum which is really small, but it also houses a library and sells used craft books cheap.

    And there's the Manitoba Museum with stupid parking near it. We had to leave because we ran out of time in the lot. Not impressed! But the museum itself is awesome. We need to go back to do the last half of it.

    And then there's Riel House, the Railway Museum, and Fort Garry (north of Winnipeg).

    Then there's Assiniboine Park and the Conservatory, and all the things that happen there.

    And the Forks, which I actually found disappointing. I think there are better places in Winnipeg to shop. BUT the big open space in the middle of the city is really nice for just strolling around and enjoying the outdoors. There's this neat (huge) antique store in the basement of the Terminal at the Forks.

    Lots of neat restaurants. We really enjoyed La Civita and the Bistro Dansk. And there was an organic free trade place...hmmm...Dandelion Eatery. Tricky to get into and out of, but well worth the effort.

    Enough about Winnipeg! I've traveled all across Canada and been in all the cities mentioned. They all have their own charm. It depends what you like to do when you travel. If you like crafty stuff the Maritimes and Quebec would be key places I would think. If you like night life you definitely want the bigger centers. If you're into extreme sports, probably B.C. and Alta. Maybe the north. If you're into nature...well...most of Canada is a lot more wild than the U.S., so you don't have to go far to experience it.

    One thing you will find, there is a lot of space between places in Canada. We have one tenth the population of the US.
    If the map doesn't show a town between point A and point B, there really isn't one. And that means no gas station and no bathroom either. In some cases long stretches with no water supply. So be sure you tank up when you have the chance, and always check ahead to see where your next fill up will be. And carry water and food in the car with you...especially on the prairies.

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    Registered User rachelMcK's Avatar
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    I grew up in a small tourist town in ontario. We had so many Americans that vacationed there and when it came time for me to find a summer job, it was always customer service, and always very tourist-y. We viewed Americans the same way we viewed people from Toronto. We called the "Citiots" (city idiots). I had never met such rude people in my life. No manners or regard for our little town. They'd throw their garbage onto the streets from their SUV's. Americans in particular really enjoyed the fact that most places in Canada (or at least Ontario) took US money. I had many occasions where they would hand me a bunch of dollar bills and ask me if I even knew what it was! They were very quick to consider us stupid hick Canadians. Now that I'm older I realize that not all Americans are like that, and chances are the ones that travelled here for vacations were the wealthy ones who probably treated their fellow Americans with the same disrespect, but it left a bad taste in my mouth. I've only been to the states once, when I was 8, and I don't think I will ever go again. The years with Bush in office were terribly confusing for a lot of Canadians, as we didn't understand how he could be re-elected. It's scary because what happens in American affects Canada. Except we have absolutley no say in it.
    I don't want to offend any Americans, but I know more than a few people who feel the same way as I do. I'm just being honest, but like I said, now that I'm older, I think most Americans are probably very similar to us.

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