17 things frugal people usually donít do
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  1. #1
    Registered User Contrary Housewife's Avatar
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    Default 17 things frugal people usually donít do

    https://www.theladders.com/career-ad...sually-dont-do


    #11 is so important. Learning not only saves you time and money, but can be a source of entertainment.

    #13... well IMO if you're getting sick of leftovers you made too much in the first place, or you need to freeze portions for later.

    #17 totally agree with this one. Buying stuff just to spend money is a waste.
    Stop trying to organize all of your familyís crap. If organization worked for you, youíd have rocked it by now. Itís time to ditch stuff and de-crapify your world.

    If you're not using the stuff in your home, get rid of it. You're not going to start using it more by shoving it into a closet.

    Use it up, Wear it out,
    Make it do, Or do without. ~unknown

    Because we, the people, have the power to build a better future. KH

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    Super Moderator Spirit Deer's Avatar
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    Acquiring things can cause a chemical change in the brain that makes a person feel better. Of course, it's just a sugar high, but that's one reason people do dumb things with money when under stress.

    Disagree about using credit cards, but agree about knowing whether you can handle them. We use ours for everything but it does not change our spending habits. The cash back is a big plus. We recently used almost $600 cash back for new tool batteries, and today I'm looking at a new TV and antenna for the camper with $200 or so of cash back funds. We would not have that resource if we paid cash for everything, but I understand why our approach won't work for everything.

    I would finance a car before driving something unreliable, but would buy a lease return for huge savings.

    I thought it was interesting the writer singled out campers. Our camper was spendy because we had to buy new. It's difficult to find used, especially anywhere nearby. But our recent trip cost us far less than a hotel and that includes gas, lodging, and meals. The first half, we had a beautiful lakeside site for $8/night including power. Hard to beat that. Every night we spend in the camper helps the camper pay for itself in many ways. Sticking with a lightweight popup camper greatly reduces the impact on mpg vs a taller rig. The right camper can be a big money saver.

  3. #3
    Registered User KathyB's Avatar
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    Point 5 mixes a couple things. First is the basic of not "keeping up with the Jones." In other words don't buy something expensive just because your neighbors have one. I guess that is a big thing for some people. Maybe they feel like their social status is lesser if they do not have at least as much expensive things as their neighbor. I am familiar with the phase. I understand the concept, I just never felt it personally. I am wondering if that is an upper class/upper middle class thing.

    It is hard to be frugal if you care a lot about status symbols.

    The idea is do not buy a camper just because your neighbor has one. Which is different that don't buy a camper.

    But then they toss out the phrase "living on the bare minimum." So in just two sentence we have gone from don't buy really expensive things to living on the bare minimum. That is a huge jump.

    There are different ways to be frugal. Living on the bare minimum is one way. This seems to be the way frugal people are generally portrayed on line and in the media. But that is a pretty extreme view of being frugal. And I think it can discourage people who might be comfortable with a moderate level of frugality.

    Camping can be a frugal vacation, but some people might say if you were really frugal you would not take a vacation at all. Not me of course, but some people. I have seen some sites where they seem to engage in competitive frugality. Any little bit spent you don't need to is met by teasing/harassment. I am glad we are more open minded here.

    I think there is also a break even point with campers too. If you do not use it much, it would probably be cheaper to rent hotel rooms.
    KathyB

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    Registered User KathyB's Avatar
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    I also want to add that I like the idea of not sacrificing healthy eating.

    I see a lot of frugal advice where the diet is very low in protein and well as fruits and vegetables. I attended a class many years ago that talked about healthy eating on a budget. There was good stuff in there, but the food tended to be very carb heavy and protein low. Although they did tell us to eat fruits and vegetables. They talked about adding just a little meat to a casserole or soup as "flavoring." That is fine if you have it with another protein source like beans, but most of the dishes did not.
    KathyB

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    Super Moderator Spirit Deer's Avatar
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    Nutritional science has changed a lot even in the last 10 years. Healthy eating used to mean emphasizing carbs like bread and pasta. Fats were bad, no matter what kind. Beef was good for you. The good ol' days. Now emphasis is more on veggies, fruits, healthy fats everyone needs, fiber, etc. It all makes lots more sense to me these days.

    Our camper saves us $40/night just in kennel fees. Because we have 2 stoves, 4 Dutch ovens, a convection oven, microwave, fridge with freezer, Cobb grill, and also a fire pit and/or grill provided by the campgrounds, we can cook most anything, so we rarely eat out which saves. With the Golden Age card now, we can camp at most federal cg's for half price. That varies, but was only $8/night at Carlyle Lake. No hotel can come close to that, and we had a large, paved, beautiful site. Other cg's are higher, but we use state parks, mostly, around $25/night with power, still lots less than a hotel and usually a lot nicer. There are some expenses with owning a camper, of course, but we hate hotels for so many reasons, so the expenses are worth it to us. I still think we come out ahead. Not sure this camper will pay for itself. It was expensive. Our 2 previous popups probaby did pay for themselves. Our motorhome, OTH, was one of the biggest financial mistakes we ever made. We won't talk about that. 😁😁😁

  7. #6
    Registered User Contrary Housewife's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spirit Deer View Post
    Acquiring things can cause a chemical change in the brain that makes a person feel better. Of course, it's just a sugar high, but that's one reason people do dumb things with money when under stress.
    Seratonin, adrenaline, addictive stuff. It's why some people take risks. I shop to make myself feel better, it's why I have a lifetime supply of pretty quilt fabric. I shop for the thrill of finding a bargain or clearance sale. I think that's how it works for hoarders. A lot of those people have deep emotional issues, and buying new stuff makes them feel good, for a little while. For people with depression it may be the only emotion they feel at all.
    Stop trying to organize all of your familyís crap. If organization worked for you, youíd have rocked it by now. Itís time to ditch stuff and de-crapify your world.

    If you're not using the stuff in your home, get rid of it. You're not going to start using it more by shoving it into a closet.

    Use it up, Wear it out,
    Make it do, Or do without. ~unknown

    Because we, the people, have the power to build a better future. KH

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    Super Moderator Spirit Deer's Avatar
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    Yup. I think being aware has helped me do better, but it's always a battle to resist a great buy. I'm a sucker for fabric, too. I try to stick to stuff I actually will use, but sometimes I buy just because I like it with no plan for use. Like the dog print bags I'm making. Didn't need it, but it's cute. I do need the bags though, so I was happy to have fun fabric to use. Of course, I could have used something else, so no excuses.

    Sewing for me is a mix of necessity, frugality, hobby, and entertainment. I can't feel too bad about what I spend because most of it is from secondhand sources, therefore cheap. Exception is what I do for charity which is almost all new, but I'm okay with that cost, too.

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    Registered User Tine's Avatar
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    Could one of you copy the text and post it, please? The website is geo blocked so I can’t see the list.

  10. #9
    Registered User KathyB's Avatar
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    But an actual sugar high - with real sugar is so much better.

    I have not felt the lure of retail therapy as much as some people. Maybe I don't get as much of boost from it as most people. I have struggled with depression in the past. And both my parent are hoarders. So it seems like the odds are it would hit me pretty bad.

    My dad would hit yard sales and buy a bunch of random stuff. Well not entirely random. He did have some things he collected, but he bought other stuff beyond that. I think his big thing was the thrill of getting a deal. It did not matter if it was something anyone in the family wanted or would use. If it was a good deal he would get it.

    I suppose it was less money than other types of binge shopping, but our family was always in horrible financial shape. I don't think that was the only reason our family was always running out of money and unable to pay bills. But it probably contributed to it.

    It was great negative example for me - i.e. a what not do to example.

    But I find I also get a chemical boost from things like crafting, jigsaw puzzles, reading, games, etc. People put down phone games as being "addictive" because of the chemical boost people can get from them. But compared to the chemical high from sugar, alcohol, drugs, compulsive shopping, gambling and risk taking behavior...aren't games a much better way to get that quick chemical boost?

    Looking at art can give me some good brain chemicals, but it is a completely different feeling than some of the other things. It is hard to put in words, but it is kind of close to the being in nature feeling. A feeling of awe. Similar in some ways to a spiritual feeling, but not quite. I have read before of other art lovers feeling something that seemed like the same thing, but it is not common.

    I suppose it is not exactly right to say my hobbies give me a chemical high. It is a bit of a mix. There is a feeling of comfort, a feeling of relaxation. But there is also a burst of excitement with the comes from a success. And a success does not have to be a finished project. It could be finishing one part. Or fitting two jigsaw puzzle bits together.
    KathyB

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    Super Moderator Spirit Deer's Avatar
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    Retail shopping doesn't do much for me, unless it's tools. That's slacked off a lot now that we're well stocked in our shop, too. Husby is more likely to want tools now, especially if they're a great deal. But how many sets of drill bits do we really need? Although it was me that bought a 10 pack of 1/16th" bits yesterday. They're so small they break easily, and we were almost out of them. I digress.

    We didn't realize how much we spent or how much stuff we dragged home annually when we were still going to every garage sale and the local thrift store every week, plus other sales out of town. Clutter came in a little at a time and the money went out a little at a time. Glad those days are over. The irony is what helped me the most to pare down and declutter was buying so many cheap large pieces of furniture at rummage sales and thrifts. I've mentioned before about having dedicated spaces and using those to limit the amount of stuff that comes into the house. A nice side effect is it makes us more frugal. More often than not these days, we walk out of thrifts or sales empty-handed, and more often than that, we don't go to them at all. That's getting to be a good feeling, too. Part of quitting the shopping is I've built up stashes of things we do actually need, so we don't have to shop as much.

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    What a great thread! The older I get, the less I buy. To me, everything that you own means you have more responsibility. Your camper sounds great, @Spirit Deer. It's such a personal thing. I think a lot of people get burdened with stuff after their parents die. We are settling my parents' estate right now. I am deciding which pieces of furniture to keep. I need to donate mine to make room for their antiques. As each year passes, I really find that less is more. Less possessions, less driving, less buying, and less spending. I prefer to save up all year for something special, like a vacation. At that time, I will eat in restaurants or on the train. I cook at home and look forward to it the rest of the year. I also find that I wear my clothes for a lot longer now. Most are hand knits that I've made. They last and last, and keep me warm. It's also a fun hobby to sit and knit them, at home, or out on the porch.

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