What To Do With Left-over Bread
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    Default What To Do With Left-over Bread

    WHAT TO DO WITH LEFT-OVER BREAD

    The uses for stale bread are so many and varied that it is
    obviously unwise to waste a particle.
    The bread-box requires constant supervision and care, especially in summer, when mold forms so quickly.
    It should be examined daily in hot weather, and in all
    seasons scalded and aired well before each fresh baking of bread.
    Small bits of bread should be slowly dried in the oven until crisp
    and brittle, then ground in the meat grinder or rolled, and kept on
    hand in a glass jar for breading articles to be fried, for scallops,
    croquettes, dry stuffings, etc.
    The larger dried pieces, if cut into presentable shapes, are an excellent substitute for crackers or croutons with soup, and are often preferred to fresh bread.
    Small pieces and broken slices of stale bread may be used for moist stuffings for meat and poultry, for griddle-cakes, steamed bread, bread omelet, toast points, puddings of different sorts, and for other uses which will readily suggest themselves.


    — – —

    CROUTONS
    Cut stale slices of bread half an inch thick. Trim off crusts
    (which may be set aside and used for puddings), butter the slices, and cut into half-inch cubes. Place on shallow pan and brown in a hot oven, turning them so that they may not burn. Serve with soup.


    — – —

    STEAMED BREAD
    The very dry, hard pieces may be used in this way: Heat a griddle
    hot, butter it well, dip the pieces of bread quickly into hot salted
    water, and brown on both sides on the griddle. Eat with butter or
    with syrup.


    — – —

    TO FRESHEN DRY ROLLS OR A LOAF OF DRY BREAD
    Dip them quickly into cold water, drain, and heat in oven.


    — – —

    BREAD GRIDDLE-CAKES (with Sour Milk)
    Use equal quantities of sour milk and small, broken pieces of
    bread. Mix and let stand, covered, over one or two nights. Bits of
    rice may be added to this mixture if desired. In warm weather a
    little salt may be added. (In this case omit adding salt later.)
    When ready to use, put through colander. For each pint of mixture use one egg, one teaspoon soda, one teaspoon sugar, one-fourth teaspoon salt, and about three-quarters of a cup sifted flour. It is always wise to bake a small cake first, that any lack in ingredients may be remedied at once. An extra yolk or small amount of uncooked egg may be added if at hand. Bake on hot griddle and serve with syrup.


    — – —

    BREWIS (from Boston Brown Bread)
    Take dry Boston brown bread and break into small pieces, having two cupfuls. Put into saucepan, add milk enough to cover (one pint or more). Let soak awhile on low heat; when all is soft, increase heat and let simmer until milk is absorbed. Add a little salt and a tablespoon of butter. Serve with cream.


    — – —

    BOSTON-BROWN-BREAD TOAST
    Dry slightly in the oven the needed number of slices of brown bread and toast them carefully. Lay them on a warm platter, butter, and pour over them white sauce, to which one or two spoons of finely chopped cooked ham have been added. Serve very hot.


    — – —

    BROWN-BREAD RELISH
    Put a little bacon fat in a frying-pan. When it is hot add any cut
    slices of Boston brown bread and brown carefully. Slip a poached egg on each slice and serve hot.


    — – —

    BIRD'S-NEST TOAST
    Cut a slice of stale bread in a large circle. Toast it carefully
    over a slow fire until a delicate brown. Dip the edges very quickly
    in hot salted water and put it on a hot baking-tin, where it will
    keep warm. Butter if desired. Separate a perfectly fresh egg. Add
    a little salt to the white and beat to a stiff froth. Pile this on
    the toast, make a depression in the center, into which carefully slip the yolk. Heat in the oven just enough to "set" the yolk, and serve it on a warm plate.


    — – —

    SOFT BUTTERED TOAST
    Toast six or eight slices of stale bread. Melt one-fourth cup
    butter in half a cup of boiling water in a bowl. Quickly dip each
    slice of toast in it. place in hot dish, and pour remainder of "dip"
    over all.


    — – —

    MILK TOAST
    Toast bread to a golden brown, having it dry all through. Keep hot in deep dish in oven. Make white sauce, using one and a half cups for six slices of toast. Pour between and over slices of toast and serve hot. If a softer toast is liked, quickly dip slices in hot
    water or milk before adding sauce.


    — – —

    BREAD STICKS
    Remove the crusts from any slices of stale, close-textured bread,
    and cut in strips about five inches long and one-half inch wide.
    Roll in melted butter and brown delicately in the oven, or fry in
    deep, hot fat without rolling in butter. These can be served with
    cheese instead of crackers.


    — – —

    QUICK BREAD OMELET

    3 eggs.
    1/2 cup soft bread crumbs.
    5 tablespoons white sauce.
    Dash of cayenne
    Salt and pepper.

    Make the white sauce and pour while hot over bread-crumbs, mixing and mashing them well. Beat yolks of eggs until thick, and stir them, with the extra seasoning, into the white sauce mixture. Cut and fold in the stiffly beaten whites. Have ready a hot, buttered frying-pan, turn in omelet, and cook lightly. Set pan in oven to dry off top of omelet, turn out on warm platter, and serve at once.


    — – —

    BREAD CEREAL
    Dry bread in oven until crisp and brown. Roll on board, or put
    through meat grinder, having crumbs coarse. Serve warm as a
    breakfast food with cream.


    — – —

    CRUST COFFEE
    Cut the crusts from slices of Boston brown bread and brown in oven until they are much darker in color, but not burned. Put into
    saucepan, pour boiling water on them, and let stand covered where they will keep hot for fifteen minutes. Pour off the liquid into a hot coffee-pot, and serve with sugar and cream. An excellent and wholesome substitute for coffee.


    — – —

    CHOCOLATE BREAD PUDDING

    1 pint milk.
    4 tablespoons grated chocolate.
    2 tablespoons butter.
    1/3 cup sugar.
    Whites of 2 eggs.
    Yolks of 2 eggs.
    1 1/2 cups stale bread-crumbs (soaked in 2/3 cup water).
    2 tablespoons powdered sugar.
    Vanilla.

    Scald milk, add chocolate melted over hot water, butter, and
    sugar. Stir well and pour over the soft bread-crumbs and beaten
    yolks of eggs. Add one teaspoon vanilla, pour into buttered pudding-dish, and bake half an hour. Make meringue of whites of eggs beaten until stiff and dry, the powdered sugar, and half a teaspoon vanilla. It may be served warm or cold.


    — – —

    BREAD PUDDING

    3 eggs.
    2 cups bread-crumbs.
    1/2 teaspoon cinnamon.
    1/2 cup raisins.
    2 tablespoons butter.
    1 quart milk.
    1/2 teaspoon salt.
    Little nutmeg.

    Scald milk. Add butter and bread-crumbs. Beat eggs light and add
    with salt and spice to bread mixture. Bake lightly in moderate oven about an hour. To be served warm with hard sauce or lemon sauce.


    — – —

    MOCK INDIAN PUDDING
    Butter on both sides three slices of white bread, add one quart of
    milk, two-thirds of a cup of molasses, and a little salt. Bake
    slowly about two and a half hours, stirring often until well mixed.
    Serve with cream.


    — – —

    BROWN BETTY
    Place alternate layers of chopped juicy apples, and stale bread-
    crumbs in buttered baking-dish, having crumbs on bottom. Add
    cinnamon and sugar to each layer of apple, using more sugar if apples are very tart. Make a top layer with bread-crumbs and add more butter. Bake for an hour, covering dish at first. Crown crumbs on top. Serve warm with hard sauce or white sauce, or if preferred, sugar and cream. Scant sugar in pudding if sweet sauce is used.


    — – —

    CURRANT PUDDING

    1 pint currants.
    1/2 cup sugar.
    6 or 8 slices stale bread.

    Stew fruit, boiling about five minutes. Add sugar just before
    removal from heat. Cut crusts from bread and fit slices neatly into
    bowl or dish from which the pudding will turn out well. Pour
    currants between and over slices, covering all parts of bread. Cover closely, place in the fridge to set. Serve cold with cream and sugar.


    — – —

    CHERRY PUDDING

    1 cup of fine sifted bread-crumbs.
    1 cup flour.
    4 tablespoons sugar.
    1 cup pitted cherries.
    4 tablespoons butter.
    About 1/2 cup of milk or enough to make a soft dough.
    1/2 teaspoons salt.
    2 teaspoons baking-powder.
    1 egg.

    Mix crumbs, flour, sugar, salt, and baking-powder together. Rub in the butter with a spoon. Beat the egg until light, add the milk, and stir into the dry materials. Sprinkle the least bit of flour on the cherries and add them. Bake about half an hour. Serve hot with vanilla sauce.


    — – —

    NEW ENGLAND PAN PIE ("Pan-dowdy")

    Apples.
    Light bread dough.
    1/2 cup molasses.
    1/2 cup sugar.
    2 tablespoons butter.
    Pieces of stale bread.
    1/2 teaspoon clove.
    1/2 teaspoon cinnamon.
    1/4 teaspoon nutmeg.

    Fill a good-sized baking-dish with juicy apples pared and
    quartered, cover with a crust made of bread dough (or pastry), and bake until apples are soft and crust brown. Take off crust while adding to apples the butter, molasses, sugar, spice, and pieces of bread. (Amount of bread may vary.) Replace crust, having brown side down, and spread with some of the apple. Cover closely with a pan and bake in moderate oven for two hours. Turn out on flat dish and serve cold with cream.


    — – —

    SPICED GRAHAM PUDDING
    Take half a loaf of stale graham bread before it gets very dry, and
    cut off all the hard crust. Press seeded raisins well into the bread
    to cover the entire surface. Make a custard mixture of two cups of
    cold milk, two eggs, four tablespoons sugar, one-half teaspoon salt, one teaspoon mixed spices, and one-quarter teaspoon nutmeg. Mix the sugar, salt, and spices together and add them to the beaten eggs. Pour in the milk. Soak the bread in this until it entirely absorbs it, turning occasionally so all sides are moistened. Put into a buttered pudding-mold, and steam one hour. Serve with maple sauce.


    — – —

    STEAMED BREAD PUDDING

    1 pint bread-crumbs.
    1 cup cold water.
    1 cup molasses.
    1 teaspoon soda, dissolved in hot water.
    1 egg, well beaten.
    1 cup flour.
    1 teaspoon cinnamon.
    1 teaspoon clove
    1 cup raisins, cleaned.
    1/2 teaspoon salt.

    Mix together and steam three hours. If half rule is used, do not
    divide the egg. Nuts may be substituted for part of raisins if
    desired. Serve with hard sauce.


    — – —

    TOAST PUDDING
    Cut five or six slices of light, stale bread half an inch thick.
    Mix one beaten egg with one cup milk, add one-fourth teaspoon salt, and soak bread in this for fifteen minutes. Brown in hot butter in a frying-pan or griddle. Serve with raisin sauce.


    — – —

    CREAM PUFFS (from Pop-overs)
    Take any pop-overs left from breakfast and make an opening in them just large enough to neatly fill the center. For four to six pop-overs make a filling of one-half cup of cream sweetened with two tablespoons of sugar and flavored with one-quarter teaspoon of vanilla or a little lemon-juice. Add a very little salt and whip it. Stir in one teaspoon of melted gelatin. Place in fridge to chill. When ready to serve stir in half a cup of any fresh fruit
    that has been sugared, then drain off the juice, and fill the pop-
    overs. Serve at once. The fruit may be omitted.


    — – —

    VEGETARIAN LOAF

    2 cups white bread-crumbs.
    1 cup milk.
    2 cups pecan nuts of English walnuts.
    2 beaten eggs.
    1/2 teaspoon salt.
    1 teaspoon poultry dressing.
    1/2 cup melted butter.
    Pepper and celery salt.

    Soak bread-crumbs in milk and eggs. Put nuts through meat grinder, but do not use finest cutter, as they should not be as fine as meal. Mix with crumbs, milk, eggs, and seasoning. Grease oblong bread-pan and put in mixture, pouring a little melted butter over top. Bake half an hour, basting often with butter. Turn out on platter and serve hot, or slice cold. Use parsley for garnish.


    — – —

    SAUCES AND SYRUPS

    BREAD SAUCE
    Cook in double boiler half pint of milk, with a small onion and two
    cloves. Strain, put in saucepan, and add half a cup grated white
    bread-crumbs from the inside of the loaf, mixed to a paste with some of the hot milk. Let boil a few minutes, stirring and blending
    well. Add one-fourth teaspoon salt, a dash of cayenne, and a small piece of butter just before taking up. Two teaspoons chopped parsley may be added if desired.


    — – —

    HARD SAUCE

    1/4 cup butter.
    1 cup sifted powdered sugar.
    1/2 teaspoon vanilla.
    Nutmeg.

    Cream butter, add gradually powdered sugar, and beat together until light. Add vanilla, pile in dish in which it is to be served, grate
    nutmeg over top, and set in ice-box until needed.


    — – —

    LEMON SAUCE

    1/2 pint sugar.
    1/3 cup butter.
    1 egg.
    Juice of half a lemon.
    3 tablespoons boiling water.

    Cream butter and sugar well, add egg, beaten very light, and lemon-juice. Beat all together thoroughly and add the boiling water, a tablespoon at a time.


    — – —

    MAPLE SAUCE

    2 tablespoons butter.
    A few drops lemon juice.
    1/2 cup soft brown sugar.
    Scant 1/4 teaspoon maple extract.

    Cream the butter, add the sugar slowly, and beat well. Then stir
    in the flavoring. Set in the fridge to harden a little before using.


    — – —

    SYRUP

    3 1/2 cups light-brown sugar.
    2 cups cold water.

    Cook sugar and water together, stirring until sugar is melted.
    Skim well while boiling. Boil for about thirty minutes, or until a
    little of the liquid put on cold saucer will thicken. Syrup may be
    flavored with maple, using part maple sugar.


    — – —

    RAISIN SAUCE

    1/2 cups water.
    1/3 cup raisins.
    1/4 cup brown or white sugar.
    1 teaspoon flour
    Sprinkling of salt.
    Nutmeg.
    1 teaspoon butter.

    Boil raisins in water for fifteen minutes, add sugar, boil fifteen
    minutes longer. Thicken with the flour blended with a small amount of water. Add salt and spice, and just before taking up, the butter. Stir well and serve.


    — – —

    VANILLA SAUCE

    1 cup boiling water.
    4 tablespoons sugar.
    1/2 teaspoon lemon juice or a bit of lemon-rind.
    A little salt.
    1 egg yolk.
    1 tablespoon corn-starch.
    1 teaspoon vanilla.
    1 teaspoon butter.

    Mix the corn-starch, sugar, and salt, and pour the boiling water
    over them. Cook until thickened. Remove from heat, beat in the
    egg, yolk, butter, and flavoring.


    — – —

    WHITE SAUCE

    2 tablespoons butter.
    2 tablespoons flour.
    1/4 teaspoon salt.
    1/8 teaspoon white pepper.
    1 cup milk.

    Melt the butter, stir in the flour and seasoning and cook slowly
    without browning until the mixture bubbles. Remove from the high heat, add the milk gradually, beating and stirring constantly until the sauce thickens.

  2. #2
    Registered User captclearance's Avatar
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    I save mine in the freezer til I have enough, I toast it in the freezer and use for bread crumbs, croutons and stuffing..... Lots of new ideas here... Thanks !

  3. #3
    DebbieBob debbiepete's Avatar
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    I make bread crumbs or Louisiana style bread pudding!!!

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    Registered User Sherryh's Avatar
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    My Blue Jays have been getting mine. I break it up and throw it on the ground by the feeder and they love it!

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