Appetite Management

by Tanya Zilberter
Practically any weight lost for the price of tremendouse efforts
comes back when the efforts stop.

Is it real or all in our heads? Why is it happening to us? Does taste have calories?

Practically any weight lost for the price of tremendouse efforts
comes back when the efforts stop. In animals, body weight returns to a certain level where it remains stable after any disturbances: increased physical activity, a decrease in physical activity, etc. -- after anything forceful is canceled and say, a rat is left alone with a free access to food.

This is what makes researchers think that "set point" for body weight is a real thing. More palatable foods make the set point shift up, the tastier the higher. Foods with negative palatability do the opposite, the bitterer the lower.


What is known from experimental and clinical studies
Taste and Eating

There are multiple links between taste perceptions, taste
preferences, food preferences, and food choices and the amount of food we eat The "set point" for the body weight seems to bedetermined by psychological factors Palatability elevates body-weight set point Particular sensory and nutrient combinations in foods can facilitate overeating But! Palatable food increased diet-induced thermogenesis and reduced food efficiency Palatable food causes excess energy expenditure
Fat Preference


Preference for high-fat foods appear to be a universal human trait Fat consumption appears to be determined simply by the amount of fat available Fats produce significantly more sensory positive feedback in the obese than in the lean But!
Sensory properties of fat alone did not affect energy regulation
However well established, the data are quite confusing, aren't they?
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