Other sources besides ReStore & Craigslist?
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  1. #1
    Licence to Kill Luv2BeFrugal's Avatar
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    Question Other sources besides ReStore & Craigslist?

    We are looking for sources for things like flooring, cabinets, medicine cabinets, painting supplies, light fixtures, bathroom faucets, etc...used, but in great condition is totally fine with us!

    I'm definitely going to be scouring all the Habitat for Humanity ReStores in our area, plus Craigslist. I was wondering if there are some other options I should keep in mind.

    TIA!
    Kace - Always pinchin' pennies!

  2. #2
    Registered User Spirit Deer's Avatar
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    In my experience, you're better off to buy new faucets. Usually old ones are damaged beyond repair and it's hard to know if they are before you buy them. And buy good quality, too. Moen is the only brand I'll buy. American Standard is good, too. My dad and brother were both plumbers and those are what they recommended, so I took their word for it.

    Sometimes large community rummage sales have used building supplies. We go to one in a town fifty miles from here that's put on by the Lions Club in that town. They hold it in an old school and it's HUGE. It's billed at the 'million dollar garage sale' and it's big enough they get TV news coverage every year. They have all kinds of sinks, cabinets, counters, etc and whatever people donate. They also have tons of furniture of all kinds, and then smaller stuff like lamps, etc. And they have a room full of appliances. Outside, they have other building materials. And everything is dirt cheap. One of the fire departments near us has a huge annual sale, too, that isn't as big but also offers great stuff. I bought a 48" solid oak high end (million dollar homes out in that area) bathroom vanity with a cultured marble sink/counter for $10 there last year.

    You can ask for things on Freecycle in your area.

    We can salvage stuff at our local solid waste transfer station for free. That includes a building they have out there where people can place usable items such as cabinets, doors, windows, etc. They aren't always the greatest but it depends on what you need them for. Cabinets, for example, don't need to be the newest or most stylish or pretty if they're going into a garage or basement, and a fresh coat of paint can do wonders, too.

    Think outside the box, too. We curb-picked an entertainment center last year because my mom needed a large bookcase. She filled the whole dang thing with her cookbooks. The old style entertainment centers can be had cheaply and provide huge amounts of freestanding storage that can be used for anything. Last year, we bought a 3x7, two foot deep entertainment center that someone had had custom built by a local craftsman out of top quality materials. It's a perfect fit for an odd space in our bathroom where we really needed something. It only cost us $125. I used two old wooden crates in the former TV space to add 'drawers' for towel storage. The rest is all enclosed space which I've added a variety of salvaged containers to depending on the sizes of the spaces and the items needing to be stored. A couple more shallow spaces got salvaged wire baskets that came out of dishwashers. We cut the excess prongs out of the bottoms of them and added some plastic drawer dividers to organize small items. Other spaces got salvaged wire freezer baskets, enabling us to pull them out and easily get at things in the back of the cabinet.

    We bought a medium-sized entertainment center at GW for $10. We think someone slipped up on the price. Normally they sell that kind of thing for about $80. We're using it for craft storage, namely yarn and crochet thread and the tools needed for working with those, like crochet hooks and knitting needles. I organized it all using sturdy boxes that fit perfectly so they don't waste space, which I covered with Contact paper bought at a garage sale for .05 last year, about six rolls NIP. That cabinet is working great.

    We bought two other large entertainment centers at the Lions Club sale mentioned above. One went into the entry of our cabin, which I've always used for storing potting supplies. The entertainment center holds a ton of pots and other supplies. The second one went into the middle room of the cabin, where we are using it to store camping supplies. It works great! We paid $10 each for those. They're in good condition, not perfect, but nice enough. The one used for potting stuff was missing a glass door, so I simply removed the broken glass and the remaining matching door and nobody would ever notice it had doors.

    We bought a small entertainment center there too. It was the right size for a particular spot and held the TV in the bedroom, plus we added a shelf in the former TV spot and now store our travel books in the open area, with our small electronics and stuff like laptop cases in the bottom area, which has doors. We paid $10 for that, too.

    We got yet another entertainment center last year for $30 at SA that looks great with our flat screen on top of it. The old TV space got new shelves that now hold our DVDs and Wii gaming stuff. An area with a glass door holds the Dish receiver, DVR, and other electronics plus all the owner's manuals for everything, and spare remotes.

    The backers on all those cabinets were made from paneling salvaged from the solid waste station, so they cost us nothing. By thinking outside the box and using entertainment centers no longer useful for putting TVs INSIDE them, we were able to get low cost storage. Some of the spaces I mentioned were scheduled to get built-ins, like our bathroom where the tall entertainment center is. Using free-standing cabinets instead saved a lot of time, money, and work. Keep an eye out for good quality pieces and when you see them, try to think if they can be repurposed for something you need that may be unconventional, but would replace a built-in that might cost more.

    Salvaged materials and garage sales are always hit or miss, of course, and then there's the danger of dragging home more than you need and hoarding up your house. But if you're careful and imaginative, you could end up with a house that's truly unique and functions very well.

    Pinterest is a great resource for ideas on upcycling found items. Most anything can be made into a light fixture, for example. Take a peek and see.

    Happy hunting!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spirit Deer View Post
    In my experience, you're better off to buy new faucets. Usually old ones are damaged beyond repair and it's hard to know if they are before you buy them. And buy good quality, too. Moen is the only brand I'll buy. American Standard is good, too. My dad and brother were both plumbers and those are what they recommended, so I took their word for it.

    Sometimes large community rummage sales have used building supplies. We go to one in a town fifty miles from here that's put on by the Lions Club in that town. They hold it in an old school and it's HUGE. It's billed at the 'million dollar garage sale' and it's big enough they get TV news coverage every year. They have all kinds of sinks, cabinets, counters, etc and whatever people donate. They also have tons of furniture of all kinds, and then smaller stuff like lamps, etc. And they have a room full of appliances. Outside, they have other building materials. And everything is dirt cheap. One of the fire departments near us has a huge annual sale, too, that isn't as big but also offers great stuff. I bought a 48" solid oak high end (million dollar homes out in that area) bathroom vanity with a cultured marble sink/counter for $10 there last year.

    You can ask for things on Freecycle in your area.

    We can salvage stuff at our local solid waste transfer station for free. That includes a building they have out there where people can place usable items such as cabinets, doors, windows, etc. They aren't always the greatest but it depends on what you need them for. Cabinets, for example, don't need to be the newest or most stylish or pretty if they're going into a garage or basement, and a fresh coat of paint can do wonders, too.

    Think outside the box, too. We curb-picked an entertainment center last year because my mom needed a large bookcase. She filled the whole dang thing with her cookbooks. The old style entertainment centers can be had cheaply and provide huge amounts of freestanding storage that can be used for anything. Last year, we bought a 3x7, two foot deep entertainment center that someone had had custom built by a local craftsman out of top quality materials. It's a perfect fit for an odd space in our bathroom where we really needed something. It only cost us $125. I used two old wooden crates in the former TV space to add 'drawers' for towel storage. The rest is all enclosed space which I've added a variety of salvaged containers to depending on the sizes of the spaces and the items needing to be stored. A couple more shallow spaces got salvaged wire baskets that came out of dishwashers. We cut the excess prongs out of the bottoms of them and added some plastic drawer dividers to organize small items. Other spaces got salvaged wire freezer baskets, enabling us to pull them out and easily get at things in the back of the cabinet.

    We bought a medium-sized entertainment center at GW for $10. We think someone slipped up on the price. Normally they sell that kind of thing for about $80. We're using it for craft storage, namely yarn and crochet thread and the tools needed for working with those, like crochet hooks and knitting needles. I organized it all using sturdy boxes that fit perfectly so they don't waste space, which I covered with Contact paper bought at a garage sale for .05 last year, about six rolls NIP. That cabinet is working great.

    We bought two other large entertainment centers at the Lions Club sale mentioned above. One went into the entry of our cabin, which I've always used for storing potting supplies. The entertainment center holds a ton of pots and other supplies. The second one went into the middle room of the cabin, where we are using it to store camping supplies. It works great! We paid $10 each for those. They're in good condition, not perfect, but nice enough. The one used for potting stuff was missing a glass door, so I simply removed the broken glass and the remaining matching door and nobody would ever notice it had doors.

    We bought a small entertainment center there too. It was the right size for a particular spot and held the TV in the bedroom, plus we added a shelf in the former TV spot and now store our travel books in the open area, with our small electronics and stuff like laptop cases in the bottom area, which has doors. We paid $10 for that, too.

    We got yet another entertainment center last year for $30 at SA that looks great with our flat screen on top of it. The old TV space got new shelves that now hold our DVDs and Wii gaming stuff. An area with a glass door holds the Dish receiver, DVR, and other electronics plus all the owner's manuals for everything, and spare remotes.

    The backers on all those cabinets were made from paneling salvaged from the solid waste station, so they cost us nothing. By thinking outside the box and using entertainment centers no longer useful for putting TVs INSIDE them, we were able to get low cost storage. Some of the spaces I mentioned were scheduled to get built-ins, like our bathroom where the tall entertainment center is. Using free-standing cabinets instead saved a lot of time, money, and work. Keep an eye out for good quality pieces and when you see them, try to think if they can be repurposed for something you need that may be unconventional, but would replace a built-in that might cost more.

    Salvaged materials and garage sales are always hit or miss, of course, and then there's the danger of dragging home more than you need and hoarding up your house. But if you're careful and imaginative, you could end up with a house that's truly unique and functions very well.

    Pinterest is a great resource for ideas on upcycling found items. Most anything can be made into a light fixture, for example. Take a peek and see.

    Happy hunting!
    WOW!! Just WOW!! I think I'm going to have to read that 3 times just to absorb a bit of all you said!! You have got this down!! WTG!! Thank you!!!!!
    Kace - Always pinchin' pennies!

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  5. #4
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    you want to hook up w/ a salvage dealer in your area.
    type in Salvage building materials dealer in (your state).

  6. #5
    Registered User Spirit Deer's Avatar
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    Maybe some visuals will help. Here's the $10 craft cabinet. I plan to make some curtains for the glass doors at some point so it looks nicer, but it's in very good condition, a piece of salvaged paneling for a backer, and a couple shelves added to the former TV space.


    Cabinet I got at the Lions Club sale for $6. It's a perfect fit in our tiny hallway. I bought it because Husby is a pop addict and was stacking twelve-packs in that hall, which I found annoying. It holds a ton of pop and no more sweeping around the piles or having the house looking like a pop warehouse. Some kind of pop storage was on my list when we went to that sale, but this was absolutely NOT what I had in mind! But I knew as soon as I saw it beckoning from across the room it was exactly what we needed. That's what I mean about thinking outside the box and being open minded. Sometime I'd like to do some kind of interesting paint job on that piece but in the meantime, it's in good enough shape I don't have to do anything. I did apply scratch remover so the nicks in the front are gone now, and that was all it needed besides a good scrub with some Murphy's.


    I needed storage for project bags I use for work, and a place to set my story board easel. I ran across this printer stand of the type no one uses anymore, again $6. It does exactly what I need it to.


    This is a rack in my sewing room. I created it out of 2x12s which was just basic construction. I needed a custom rack to hold rolls of fabrics and provide some shelf space for storage as well. I later modified it. I planned it so I could make a storage system using some of the abundance of cat litter pails we have. In those, I store buttons, zipper, zipper chain and pulls, denim scraps, ripstop nylon scraps, all sorts of sewing-related items. I covered the fronts of the pails with Contact paper from garage sales, just to make them look a bit nicer. (I've covered the yellow pails too, since this pic was taken.) I've been using this system for years now and it works well for my purposes. I plan to set up something similar to the pail storage when we get started on redoing our garage storage later this year. This isn't a very elegant storage solution, but IMO it's plenty nice for a workroom.


    Another custom rack I built. I build a lot of things just because I'd never be able to find something ready made. The lumber for this one cost around $30. It fits over an antique buffet that provides a ton of storage in our kitchen, and in fact, I ripped out cabinets to make room for this setup because what was built in didn't provide nearly as much storage or as efficient storage as this.


    I don't have pics of the other entertainment centers to help explain how they've been repurposed. If you have questions, I'm happy to answer them.

    One thing about going to garage sales is you often find things that weren't even on your radar. This can be good and bad. It was good for us last year when we found a Harbor Freight greenhouse that sells for about $700, on the sale for $100 for the greenhouse and a whole bunch of extras. We recently got it built and I like it more every day. We would probably never have bought a greenhouse for $700 plus the $200 worth of timbers it came with that it's sitting on, but for $100 and some time, it's worth a try for us.

  7. #6
    Registered User Spirit Deer's Avatar
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    I guess I do have some pics of some of the other entertainment centers.

    This is the tall one we bought for the bathroom. It's hard to get a good pic of it because of poor lighting and not being able to get very far from it, but you get the idea. Where the clothes basket is, we now have the wooden boxes holding towels. I had planned for years to replace the ugly, useless wire shelves that were in that space with a custom built-in, so I was thrilled to find this piece because I didn't have to build it, just move it in and set it in place, and now, if we move out of this place, we can take it along. I could have never built anything this nice because I am not a master craftsman like the guy who built this, and I certainly couldn't have built it for only $125. So it saved a lot of time and money and aggravation. I do plan to add a shelf at the top of the open area, and add two shallow wooden boxes for even more storage.



    This is the one we got for $30 at SA. Our flat screen is on top. We knew what size flat screen we wanted when we bought the cabinet and made sure it would fit when we eventually bought it. It's in a corner now and as it turned out, it's worked out better than a built-in because we're able to set it in the corner at the right angle for comfortable viewing. We just love the warm finish on it. Some people paint stuff like this but we prefer it as is.

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    SD-I have your "craft cabinet" except I have 2 drawers at the bottom for material because mine is a sewing cabinet. The low boy dresser next to it has the patterns,embroidery floss,spools of thread,ribbon and buttons. I fill it and DD raids it. I assure you although they were cheap. $6. trumps mine.lol I am guessing $100. for the 2 but??

    yes,it Detroit they have beautiful supplies of all the features from 1 house and people come and get them for repairs on their. Nicole Curtis has shown it on her Auction house she rehabbed,the one w/ the solarium and butlers pantry?

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    Sd-your entertainment center is very similar to one i have in the family room I paid $1000. for years ago at Billy Bobs. OOOF. Right now I'd pay someone $20. to sledge it and get it out of here too.

  10. #9
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    We did that with one of ours. Of course we only paid $20 for it SA in Minneapolis when we lived there. That was probably fifteen years ago. We saved the wood and used some of it to make shelves in the ones we bought last year. We've trashed a lot of furniture in the past year as we bought so many upgrades.

    Too bad you can't repurpose your old entertainment center. Put it on Freecycle or out on the curb. I bet someone would take it and they could do the lifting and hauling.

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    Sd-I did put this beautiful handmade one out but no one wanted it. They are heavy and everyone has flat screens. Dd's generation are almost gypsys because of the economy. DD does odd things to make money. They dont want heavy furniture.

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