My 2018 Gardening Thread
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  1. #1
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    Default My 2018 Gardening Thread

    A new thread for a new year and growing season.

    Right now, it's extremely cold with snow on the ground. I seem to recall that having a layer of snow is a good thing since it insulates the ground against the worst of the wind and cold air changes.

    Other than that, I've been collecting my old tea bags to put into the compost bin eventually.

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    I planted some seeds Sunday/Monday in peat pots and will finish starting seeds this weekend.

    1 month ago I planted garlic and while we were gone last week some animal dug in the ground where they were planted. It was too cold to investigate so I'll do that this weekend if it ever warms up.

    We are still trying to limp some plants along but with the cold we are getting this week I'm not sure if any of it will survive. The walls of water have really helped a lot. Some of the tubes were frozen solid on Monday but the plants inside still looked great. In the walls of water we have 2 celery, 2 cabbage, 1 bok choy. Under a table covered with plastic I have 8 pineapples. Under sheets I have 5 different pepper plants. The pepper plants didn't look good on Monday and I'm very doubtful they will make it through the week.

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    Walls of water? Are those some sort of greenhouse insulation?

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    Quote Originally Posted by renmerc446 View Post
    Walls of water? Are those some sort of greenhouse insulation?
    They are a bunch of plastic tubes that you fill with water and when they are full they form a tee-pee. During the day the solar heat from the sun warms up the water then during the night the heated water gives off that heat to keep the plant from frosting or freezing. When we had the snow storm 2 weeks ago in Louisiana the Wall of Water had 3” of snow on top, when I knocked the snow off the plants inside were happy as could be. Monday when I checked them a few of the tubes were partly frozen to frozen solid but the plants inside were still looking great. I’m located in Southern Louisiana but bought them when I was in Idaho. They can give you 1-2 months of additional growing season in the spring. In the fall they will not fit over big plants so I set them beside the plants I'm trying to keep hoping they will give off enough warmth.

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    That sounds so cool. I generally don't overwinter anything on my plot in the local community garden, other than my lavender plant. That's been there since I started gardening there and is well established. I hope it makes it through the really cold weather. It made it through other cold winters a couple years back.

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    I hope your lavender makes it thorough for you.

    This is my first time of trying to winter over garden plants. We live one hour north of New Orleans and the last 2 winters were mild so I thought I would give it a try. Well, this winter was not the winter to try it! Couple of weeks ago we had 4-5" of snow!! My hubby is from Louisiana, 52 and it's the first time he's ever seen snow accumulate beyond flurries. A friend of ours had a green pepper plant on the south side of her trailer and it survived 3 winters without being covered. Amazing! If it wasn't for her telling me that I never would have tried to winter anything over. We haven't spent any money doing this so if the plants all die we are not out any money.

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    Well, good luck with the plants and stay warm. Some peppers survive in my area, some don't. I've never had any luck with them, though. Then again, I prefer the bell peppers to others so that might be the problem.

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    Livin Large I also had never heard of the walls of water...but sounds interesting! I have never tried to overwinter plants except chard. I currently have 2 ( 4 foot by 4 foot ) raised garden beds with collard greens~not doing very well, 2 (4 foot by 4 foot ) raised garden beds with Swiss Chard which I have covered with plastic which are doing well.

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    If you have a small garden and just need small amounts of seed then www.seedsnow.com has very reasonably priced small packets. I used them last fall. Since the packets are small they ship in a regular envelope. If you sign up for emails they let you know about contests, giveaways and specials. I'm likely to use them again.

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    Thanks for the suggestion, dlrcpa! I'll look into the website. Granted, half of what I plant in my garden plot are seedlings I usually pick up from my local farmer's market. But I do plant some things like peas, beans, and carrots from seeds. Carrots are usually hit or miss in my garden but I keep trying.

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    Stopped by the garden on Sunday to put the tea bags in the compost bin. The herbs in the communal herb plot are looking frost burned. They may need to be cut back in the spring.

    The red tailed hawk was on his perch (aka an old telephone/electric line pole), looking a bit rumpled due to the weather. (It was raining, damp, and a bit breezy.) I'm sure he was looking for food. The other birds weren't around to chase him away from their nests like they usually do in the spring and summer.

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    seedsnow.com emailed me a free shipping code so I am tossing things in the basket. Spent $10.91. Most packets are $.99. Perfect for small space gardener.

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    Thanks for the reminder!! I usually buy half my plants from my local farmer's market (they have seedlings, already started) but I do plant some seeds relatively early on.

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    It's too early to start seeds here, but I was looking through the packets I saved from previous years. I will need to sort through and toss the oldest ones, then decide what I will plant, and then get new seed if needed. Our community garden newsletter came this week. I am thinking of buying strawberries through them. I can get 10 plants for $2.50, compared to the $3-5 per plant charged by local nurseries.

    There is much garden cleanup to do first, and it's not going to start until the weather man stops using the word "snow" in his forecasts.
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    It's still early to start work in the garden itself, although I'm saving up teabags and banana peels for the compost bins. I placed an order on the seeds now website to see how they do. Some are herbs and wildflowers I'm thinking of giving to the garden coordinator for the community herb and wildflower beds that are outside the garden itself. I want to see how these seeds do. I'll still pick up my tomato plants from my farmers market, though. They're usually started when I get them. The peas do well started from 'seed'.

    I never bothered with getting strawberry plants. I ended up with volunteer plants from when the plot next to mine was abandoned. I try to keep them from taking over the plot.

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