Frugal Tips Passed Down Through The Generations
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  1. #1
    Administrator Cricket's Avatar
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    Default Frugal Tips Passed Down Through The Generations

    A new article we posted today got me to thinking about how some of our parents and grandparents got through some pretty tough economic times.

    How many of the daily tips that you use, come from previous generations in your family?

    Are we remembering to pass those tips on to the next generation?

    Frugal Tips Passed Down Through The Generations-grandmother.jpg

    What My Grandmother Taught Me
    "These are just some things I do around the home to save money, and also space. Having an item in your cupboard that is used for multiple things helps a great deal. It helps with storing, and with keeping the budget in check."
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    Registered User Ayanka's Avatar
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    My mums money advice: don't invest money you don't have and don't borrow but for a house. So far I am doing it and its working ok. Btw my parents to have retirement savings, just not investments in the stock market directly.

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    Registered User cab54's Avatar
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    My maternal grandmother taught me so much about being frugal. She used everything UP. I remember she put 1/2 a bag of chocolate chips in each recipe of CC cookies. She would peel apples for pie and put the peels into a kettle with water and simmer till it was 'apple juice' and make jelly out of that. She took plastic bags and crocheted them into doormats at the back door and in the garage, to wipe feet Just So many little things all day, every day. The Depression did a job on their thinking back then. And she came from a family of 11 kids, where one baby died in the winter. I don't think she ever wasted a thing. Her step-dad gave her a few heads of cabbage from his garden and she made sauerkraut in crocks. (they were German). She was amazing.

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    Your post made me smile because it reminds me so much of my dad and what he told me of his mom, the grandmother I never met because she passed away two weeks after my mom and dad married. According to him, she never wasted a thing, and my dad followed in her footsteps and was, himself, a bit of a pack-rat. His clutter drove my mom crazy, and me too at times. But I'm glad he shared his past with me. It's given me a deeper appreciation for "waste not, want not", though at times, I can be a spendthrift like my mom was. I'm trying to get back to frugal and happy to learn from stories like these!

    Your signature is a wonderful quote that I made note of for future reading! Just wonderful!

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    My Dgram was like a frugal traffic director. She was always connecting things to people. And people to things. She always knew who was looking for what and who had it. Very little money left her bank acct.

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    Registered User Rona's Avatar
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    Baking was an important thing, I was once told that you will never feel under pressure for money if you have a few baked goodies in the house. This has been my motto over the last few years. Currently I have half a strawberry sponge cake, scones & will be baking some buns today.
    Reuse & repurpose: Old tea towels - rags. Old food tubs for freezer storage. Tin cans have been used as plant pots. etc.
    Although probably from my grandmother I have a thing about shoes especially for small kids, I get them fitted and buy good quality.

    FW your grandmother sounds amazing

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    Registered User larabelle's Avatar
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    My grandmother never discussed the depression or how hard it was however my mom told me that my grandmother was one of 12 kids and my grandmother was sent to live with an aunt in the middle of the depression. Although my grandmother did not give me any tips there were a couple things I noted she did. 1.) She always bought quality items and then she kept them FOREVER! I am talking everything from shoes to appliances. 2.) She rarely went out to eat and cooked everything from scratch. 3.) She rode the bus versus driving. 4.) She only wore makeup to church and even then it was just face powder, lip stick and blush. 5.) She always lived in old houses. 6.) She did her hair herself
    Blessed and Highly Favored!!!!
    From $78K in debt to debt free and purchased a house and used car with 100% cash...God is sooo Good!!!

    Goals:
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    It has been passed down to me that if you are in a store and not sure if you should buy a certain item to walk outside and think about it for a while. Most of the time I find that I won't make the effort to go back in and make the purchase and can do without it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by larabelle View Post
    My grandmother never discussed the depression or how hard it was however my mom told me that my grandmother was one of 12 kids and my grandmother was sent to live with an aunt in the middle of the depression. Although my grandmother did not give me any tips there were a couple things I noted she did. 1.) She always bought quality items and then she kept them FOREVER! I am talking everything from shoes to appliances. 2.) She rarely went out to eat and cooked everything from scratch. 3.) She rode the bus versus driving. 4.) She only wore makeup to church and even then it was just face powder, lip stick and blush. 5.) She always lived in old houses. 6.) She did her hair herself
    totally know about this! i know an elderly lady (90 yrs old) and she still has her bedroom furniture from when she got married back in 1950! and it looks brand new! everything she owns is old. buy once and forget about it! she rarely goes out to eat unless her children take her out. she eats the same thing for breakfast, lunch and for dinner, she alternates between pork, lamb, chicken and beef. very simple food menu and lifestyle.

    i'm guessing she has lots of money too. her home is paid for in the bay area. and she has investments as well. she was born about 4 years before depression hit, so her parents raised her and her siblings frugally! even now, she won't let food go to waste. if there is a fruit that has mold, she will cut that piece of, no throwing the whole fruit out, none of that!

    she never went on vacations with her spouse or children. all she has done in her life is save, save, save! don't know if that is a good thing, but she definitely will be leaving her children and grandchildren a fortune.

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    Probably a frugal 'tradition' in my family is the use of coupons. My mom is a huge fan of coupons so before I buy anything I try to look for coupons anywhere to buy it.

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    Registered User Alaska's Avatar
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    My Grandma was 12 when the Japanese bombed the Aleutians in WWII and grew up alternating between a government internment camp and government boarding schools. She is the epitome of frugal. Every summer fish, and gather berries for the freezer. Like Bayareamom's Grandma, mine buys things once, quality and never buys it again. Heck, her kitchen table was her Mother's and she lives in the house her parents built. She reuses everything from bread bags/grocery bags to cool whip and butter containers. She saves her mason jars and makes her own jelly and reuses the jars for decades. She smokes salmon, pickles it, dries it, salts it, makes lox, we eat the eggs as caviar. There isn't a thing in the ocean that she can't find a way to cook or prep for dinner. She grew up with 8 siblings and there were always extra kids around from relatives that couldn't take care of their own. She is amazing. And my Grandpa was the same way, rest his soul. He built her her first studio (she is an artist) out of salvaged lumber from the landfill.

    I think the biggest take-away I got from her though was to not buy cheap crap. I see my friends buying payless shoes for their kids and buying half a dozen or more pairs a year. My kid gets three pairs for every size he goes through, and I spend money on them because a good shoe is worth it. Jeans too. He was a slow grower for about 4 years and wore a boys 8-10 from a while and I'm glad I invested in carhartt and levis for those years. Aside from patching up knees and sewing a rare pocket back on we saved big time. Winter coats too.

    And our number one frugal family practice? Yard sales annually. Get rid of the clutter, if you don't use it anymore and its still in good condition, re-sell it so you can afford the quality version of the things you need. I recently had an online yard sale on facebook and made $110 fairly rapidly to help my afford a new washing machine and then ended up finding a really good deal on a quality washer that a friend was selling for $100 because she decided to go with stackables and I needed a top loader, she sold it to me for $100 if I could help her find someone to install hers for her so my friend Sean did it for her and then brought mine to me and helped me install it. I came out $10 ahead on that one!! Lol!

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