How are u managing with the rising cost of food - Page 2
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  1. #16
    Registered User krbshappy71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brennasmom View Post
    * meal plan (this saves me a lot of money by not buying things I don't need)

    * Bountiful Baskets - for $16.50 I get a basket of fruits and a baskets of veggies. We have only been using this for a few months but have been happy so far

    * I make some things ahead and freeze (breakfast burritos, pizza pockets, burritos, etc...) Good for lunches or busy nights

    * I am trying to make more bread... I would like to try to make hamburger buns but haven't gotten to it yet

    * Use up leftovers

    * Pack my kids lunches (and mine too!)

    * Homemade refried beans are easy to make. I made a big pot and freezer in ziploc bags.
    Bountiful Baskets? Haven't heard of that, must google!

    *edit, googled, interesting!! Too far away for me, the nearest location. But I always like learning of new things!

  2. #17
    Registered User Joshin's Avatar
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    I cook seasonally, which goes a long way to lowering the grocery budget. In winter we eat a lot of potatoes, carrots and root veggies, winter squashes, and things I've frozen from the summer and fall garden, like spinach and broccoli. In spring it's a lot of salads, and in summer all the wonderful veggies that are available. Fruits are also seasonal, which means apples, oranges and bananas in winter, and everything else in summer.

    We split a side of beef with my parents once a year, and since meat is a condiment or side dish here, it last about 12 months. Other meats are only purchased on sale and rarely. We use tofu and seitan instead of meat in most dishes (much less expensive, especially since I recently started making my own seitan). I occasionally splurge on seafood, usually shrimp or real crab, but that is a treat.

    I shop a lot at farmer's markets and pick your own orchards/farms in the summer and fall. I also shop at Asian markets a lot and much of our menu is Japanese/Asian food, which is much less expensive than the standard meat and potatoes American meal.

    We don't buy prepackaged foods at all, except for dry pasta. I bake our breads. We don't eat cereal (a real budget buster!).

    So far our grocery budget is still averaging out to $250 a month for four people. I've had to get a bit creative and spread my shopping to some stores I previously didn't visit to achieve this. I've had to cut out most cheese due to it's A couple of veggie sides, a protein, and a rice or other starch ridiculous cost now, and we only use it sparingly. The kids eat PB&J now instead of meat and cheese sandwiches. DH was a swA couple of veggie sides, a protein, and a rice or other starch orn carnivore, but he is slowly starting to change as he becomes more interested in healthy eating. He and I are thinking of skipping our beef purchase this year and going vegetarian except for the occasional seafood purchase and special occasion meal.

  3. #18
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    Lipton Cold Brew is good and if I watch for a sale I can usually find a box around $3

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  5. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by krbshappy71 View Post
    Bountiful Baskets? Haven't heard of that, must google!

    *edit, googled, interesting!! Too far away for me, the nearest location. But I always like learning of new things!
    We only do it every other week because it isn't super close on the opposite weeks. I drive about 15 miles for the pickup. But you do get a lot of produce

  6. #20
    Registered User BlissMommy's Avatar
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    I'm being more careful about purchasing loss leaders, shopping at the grocery outlet, starting to learn how to coupon, and I'm learning how to can. I am also planning out my menus and making the kids eat what we have. They've gotten a little picky.

  7. #21
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    We are vegan but also don't buy the fancy fake meats. I make my own sandwich "meat" from soy or gluten. We mostly eat beans, cornbread and what we grow in our gardens. We never buy processed foods.

    We can, freeze, and dry many fruits and vegetables. We grow lots of potatoes, winter squash, rutabagas, etc. and store them. We order grains, nuts, seeds, raisins, etc in bulk from a couple of co-ops. Much less expensive!! My co-op budget is $50 every month and then an extra $100 every other month. At the grocery store, I usually spend around $60-$80 a month and that includes any HBA's, toilet paper, etc. I try to get TP from a discount food store but they don't always have it. I would like to spend more but we just don't have it! I'm always glad for the summer garden so we can have tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchini and other fresh things. We recently started strawberry and blackberry patches and added to our blueberry patch and gooseberry patch.

    DS is gluten-free and the brown rice pasta is expensive. We watch for it to go on sale at the co-op and buy a couple of cases. Someone mentioned Trader Joe's brand being cheaper. I wish we had a TJ's here or that you could order from them online! DS likes their brand too. There are other cheaper brands but he says they are not worth eating to him. I make all his GF breads. www.healthyhomecookin.com has some good GF recipes for healthy cakes, bread, etc.

    It's tough and not going to get any better, I'm afraid. At least not any time soon.

  8. #22
    Registered User Daisygirl's Avatar
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    Here they have something called a "GOOD FOOD" basket that you can purchase once a month. The information is available at the unemployment office. You get a lot of great produce at a price of about $20-30 month. It's more than we can eat and we process the leftovers (canning or freezing for winter.) You don't have to be considered "low-income" to buy it.

    To locate one in your area if you are in Canada, go on the local Job Gym website. In the US, try calling your unemployment/welfare office - there may be something similar offered.

    Because it is not -for-profit, it isn't really advertised. This may be why you've never heard of it. When I was unemployed last year this was a gift from God.

  9. #23
    Registered User Daisygirl's Avatar
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    Link to the local good food box - maybe this will help you all track down something similar.

    Good Food Box, Niagara Region

  10. #24
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    We have angel foods but was not really impressed with it. tasted very processed.As far as produce baskets I have never heard of them in this area. Hopefully with July 4th holiday coming up I can stock up on meat Hubby said he wanted to bite the bullet and put $200 aside for the holiday if it is a god sale. Maybe casseroles, meatless, and breakfast is the way to go.

  11. #25
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    My biggest killers are cereal, cheese, peanut butter, milk, and meat. My kids will easily go through 5 boxes/bags of cereal a week and I had to put a stop to that. The more I stocked on peanut butter, the more my DD went through it.

    Thankfully, we do eat a lot of rice, potatoes, pasta, beans, and bags of veggies. Costco seems to be helping with buying things in bulk too. I bought 15 boxes of rice milk for 14.99. So much cheaper than the store sales. Big bags of frozen veggies comes out cheaper too.

  12. #26
    Registered User Debbie-cat's Avatar
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    We have been trying to go meatless twice a week. It is difficult as DH doesn't consider it dinner unless there is meat on the table.

    Watching sales, couponing and picking up the loss leaders.

    Getting creative in the kitchen.

    Eating from garden.

    It's only going to get worse I am afraid.




  13. #27
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    I found a deal on Skippy Natural for $1 a month or so ago and stocked up. DS LOVES PB.

  14. #28
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    Haven't read all the posts yet but wanted to reply with what we do ... There are just the two of us adults and the cat. The cat is about $25 a month. We spend the other $225 on groceries. We only purchase groceries from Costco. No other stores. Though we tend to eat a lot of the same things month in/month out, we have not seen a price increase in what we buy for the last 9 months of our marriage. We buy groceries every two weeks. Groceries for us include all food, hba, cat food and litter (though his stuff is only once a month or less, as we get his litter at Costco and it lasts about 6 weeks. He's an exception though, as Costco doesn't carry his brand of cat food - he is allergic to chicken and that's all they carry). If you make simple meals, even mac and cheese or hot dogs, a whole chicken here and there, have meatless days at least 4 times a month and bring lunch from home, you probably won't see the increase in price that much. I will be starting a job at the end of July and will need more lunch items and more veggies/fruit, but we'll only increase our budget by about $20 a month for those. Still within reason for about $68 a week.

  15. #29
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    I am having to work MUCH harder to stretch my grocery dollars. I ONLY buy when things are on sale and/or I have a coupon. I also buy a lot of store brands. When I find a good deal, I stock up. My stockpile is the biggest it has ever been.

    I now spread my shopping between:

    HEB
    Kroger
    WalMart
    Food A Rama
    Food Town
    Big Lots
    Bread store
    Salvage store
    Farmer's market
    Joe V's

    I cook almost totally from scratch. I do not buy boxed meals/mixes, frozen entrees, etc. It takes a little more time, but it saves a lot of money and the food is more nutritious, better for you, and has less sodium and preservatives. Buy and use seasonal foods. They are more plentiful when in season and the price is usually lower. Branch out, try new things, recipes!

    We are eating less meat and more beans! I will never be a vegetarian because I am a carnivore.

    I also have a vacuum sealer and a dehydrator. So when I buy in bulk/on sale I can store things and not have them go bad, get bugs, etc.

    I know this is frugal forum and many don't use credit cards, but I have a PayPal business debit card that pays me interest AND 1.5% cashback when I use the existing balance and the card as credit. I also use my Discover card and sign up for 5% cash back promotions for gasoline, groceries, etc. I ALWAYS pay the card in full when the bill comes in.

    This is my first time to grow a few veggies. I hope to branch out and grow more a little at a time as I learn what works for me and my area. I have started out small so that I didn't put out a lot of money in case it was a total flop.

    I am always looking for ways/places to save money - gasoline, water and electricity usage are big on my list. I have cut my electricity usage over 33% over the last couple of years. Errands are planned in such a manner to use as little gasoline as possible. Due to my large stockpile, I can go weeks without going to the store if need be.

  16. #30
    Registered User mh3rdwheel's Avatar
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    There is an Anget food ministries in my daughters village, just 20 minutes away. I think I will give them a call.

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