Ideas for Lyonaise Sausage & what is it?!
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  1. #1
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    Default Ideas for Lyonaise Sausage & what is it?!

    A friend gifted me with an unopened Lyonnaise sausage. It's huge! No way are DH and I going to eat this thing alone before it goes bad.

    Can anyone give me some ideas of how to cook with it and use it in meal plans?

    Can it be frozen in chunks for later eating?

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    Peanut-too fancy for me! looked it up. Recipebridge.com I mean they paired it w/ potato salad but were cooking it w/ champagne and such. Let us know how you do it?

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    Yeah...when I googled it I got recipes with white wine and champagne in them. I can't have that stuff. I understand from googling that it has pistachios in it. I like pistachios, but in sausage???! I don't know...

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    TFFM-to fancyfor me. lol
    They do call sausage "surprise packages" in Australia.

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    Registered User Ayanka's Avatar
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    I did well in using sausage up in a strange asian recipe. I ll post the link, let me know if you want it translated, because it is in Dutch, but it has pictures etc . Nasi met rookworst en sambal-omelet - Recept - Allerhande - Albert Heijn

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    Yep! I can see where it would get that name!

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    Ayanka...omelet? Okay, I'm game for that. An omelet with sausage sounds almost normal. If you don't mind, I'd love the recipe.

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    Registered User Ayanka's Avatar
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    Ingredients:
    2/3 of a pound or 300 grams of white rice
    1 Sausage approx 1/2 pound or 250 grams
    3 table spoons of sunflower oil (I use vegetable oil)
    1 pount or 450 grams of vegetables for nasi (including one red pepper)
    3 eggs
    2 tea spoons of sambal (I use a combo of sambal and bell pepper powder, as I don't like spicey)
    3 small onions (there is a special kind requested, but I never used them)
    2/3 of a pound or 340 grams of atjar tjampoer, this is a foreign ingredient, that if you can find it in Canada, is going to be so expensive. It is eaten as a side dish, so I would drop it out. I personally don't eat this with this dish, as I freeze it.

    The literal translation of the preparation, to my best ability.
    Cook the rice according to the instructions on the packaging. Mean while cut the sausage in small blocks of
    a fifth of an inch or halve a cm. Heat the oil in the wok and bake the sausage blocks on high heat.


    Remove the stem of the bell pepper, cut lengthwise and remove the seeds with a knife.
    Cut the bell pepper in small parts. Add the rice, the red pepper and the vegetables to the sausage
    and stir fry at middle high heat for 5 minutes.

    Meanwhile whip up the eggs witht he sambal. Heat the rest of the oil in a pan and bake the egg at both sides on middle high heat till golden brown. Cut the small onions in very thin rings. Cut the omelet in small long strips. Divide the omelet and the onion over the nasi. Serve with the Atjar.

    Serving tip: let the rice cool down for an even better result.

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    Super Moderator Spirit Deer's Avatar
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    Of course, try a little of it to see if you like the taste before making a huge batch of something.

    I freeze all kinds of sausages and have never had any issues with that.

    I don't see why you couldn't use this sausage the way you'd use any sausage. But then I consider most recipes to be merely polite suggestions or starting points, not iron-clad laws mounted on stone. Almost any recipe can be messed with.

    This looks like a simple cooking method that does not use any unusual ingredients. I'm guessing whatever you do, you should cook this before eating it, based on the instructions here. French cooking : Lyonnaise sausages I'd be adding some chunks of cabbage and carrots to the above, but like I said, I usually do tinker with recipes.

    Most any sausage is good cubed and then fried with onion and potatoes, which we always called fresh-fried potatoes when Mom made them.

    Of fry up some sausage slices with onions, zucchini, carrot sticks, cabbage, bell pepper, whatever sounds good. I don't know what it's called. I just call it a hash and often use it to clean out the fridge of any veggies that are in need of being used up. You can add most any veggie you can fry to it and it's always good. We like it with fresh, coarsely ground black pepper and soy sauce as a condiment, but you can use whatever seasonings you like.

    Or you could cook it in the Crock-Pot with potatoes and veggies.

    Or cube it and add to omelets, scrambled eggs, breakfast burritos, etc.

    You could grill it and serve it in buns like a brat, with lots of crispy fresh veggies and tasty condiments piled on the top. And cheese. Cheese would be good melted on it, too.

    There are a million sausage soup recipes, and winter is coming. Soup is a good way to have small portions of meat and not make it seem like it's a small portion, so you can avoid getting too much sodium and other bad but tasty sausage ingredients all at one time.

    The possibilities are endless.

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    Thanks Ayanka and SD. We did a double look as we were cutting into it. It's called Lyoner sausage (not Lyonnaise!) and is gluten free and lactose free. My friend was definitely thinking of me. We decided to try it plain, as it said it was fully cooked, and pan fried. We liked it both ways, but I'm partial to the pan fried version personally.

    DH had it with some leftover potatoes that he pan fried and said it was very good that way. So I think I will try some of it with a warm potato salad recipe of MY choosing (skip the ones with white wine and champagne in them!) and in an omelet like Ayanka suggested.

    Ayanka, you are right. Not only will I not be able to find atjar tjampoer locally, but also I've never seen sambal or red pepper powder. They would be specialty items here, if I could find them at all. I think I'll try it straight up in an omelet.

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    Super Moderator Spirit Deer's Avatar
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    Wow, no red pepper powder, as in cayenne? How do you people live? LOL!

    Here's a recipe for atjar tjampoer. Ayanka can see if it looks right. If not, it would probably taste pretty good regardless, and it looks simple enough to make. So what if it's not authentic? BTW, I figured out thanks to Bing that kunjit is turmeric. https://recipeland.com/recipe/v/atjar-tjampoer-4171

    Sambal sounds to me like chili powder, and maybe red pepper powder is chili powder, too. So if it was me, I'd just use chili powder. Again, so what if it's not completely authentic? As long as it tastes good!

    I like most sausages with a variety of different mustards (at different times.) Also sliced up, since it's pre-cooked, and simmered a little in sauerkraut. Yum!

    ETA: I was wrong! Sambal is, apparently, a sauce, not a powder. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sambal
    I would still sub chili powder to taste. Or maybe even salsa. IMO, if you're not trying to duplicate a known recipe you've tasted and loved, anything goes when it comes to tinkering.

    I'm reminded of my friend in Texas who gets all wound up because I sometimes use green olives in Mexican cooking instead of ripe olives. It makes him crazy because it's not authentic enough for him. Personally, I like green olives so I'm going to eat them because I'm of the belief that cooking shouldn't come with too many rules.

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    Hold it! Red pepper powder is cayenne? We got that here, hands down. Two or more types - the mild and the hot. We have mild in the house.

    Hmm...we also have some Korean red chili pepper powder. That's hot stuff. Hmm...

    ETA: I've been exploring RecipeBridge.com's sausage recipes. Looks good!

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    I don't know if red pepper powder is ground cayenne. That's just what I thought of when you said you had never seen it there. But after doing a little (very little) research online now I'm thinking it's more likely chili powder, though I'm not completely sure about that either.

    My point is, if you don't have the seasonings the recipe calls for, think about the other ingredients and put in what you have that you think will complement the other ingredients. It might not be authentic, but you might create a new dish you'll love anyway. Some of my best stuff has come about because I didn't have what was called for in a recipe. Experiment! Be sure to make notes if you find a variation you like though, so you can re-create your new creation in the future.

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    Oh drats! Gotcha though. Normally I would experiment. But we just don't eat sausage here. I'm clueless what to do with it. Or was until today! I see it's listed as German bologna in some of the Google results. So it's nothing special. We'll use it up.

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    I don't know where you come up with red pepper powder to be honest. I supplement it with Bell peppr powder which is, just ground dried bell pepper aka one of the most basic tastes of crisps. I really hope you can find that in a store. It should be something like this, though mine is dark red:Amazon.com : Whole Spice Bell Pepper Roasted Powder, Red, 4 Ounce : Red Bell Peppers Produce : Grocery & Gourmet Food. Inhere I can get it at about any grocery store, though I buy the big bags from the chinese store.

    Sambal is indeed a sauce, which I don't have in the house cause I don't like spicey, so I use either chili powder (mix very very well) or bell pepper powder. I wouldn't use salsa, because it is a bit too liquid, and might give some side effects when being baked.

    The atjar tjampoer recipe looks fine, though I d need a picture to be sure. But as I said, its a side dish, that can be easily replaced or removed.

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