frugal tips from the great depression
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  1. #1
    Registered User Contrary Housewife's Avatar
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    Default frugal tips from the great depression

    Good advice never goes out of style.


    https://www.agriculture.com/family/f...eat-depression
    Stop trying to organize all of your family’s crap. If organization worked for you, you’d have rocked it by now. It’s time to ditch stuff and de-crapify your world.

    If you're not using the stuff in your home, get rid of it. You're not going to start using it more by shoving it into a closet.

    Use it up, Wear it out,
    Make it do, Or do without. ~unknown

    A clean house is a sign of a wasted life. ~unknown

  2. #2
    Registered User KathyB's Avatar
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    There is some advice that is potentially useful to everyone.

    However it is from a farming magazine. Some advice assumes you have a farm or at least the possibility of a backyard garden.

    If you live in an apartment or condo, it is not going to work for you. Am I the odd one out here for not having a place with a yard? Okay I just did a quick search. Only 2 in 10 Americans live in an apartment or condo v. a house. So I guess I am the odd one out. I am pretty sure that figure is a lot higher in the area where I live.
    KathyB

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    Farming mags have some good advice and makes me think of the times I spent working/playing on my uncle's farm. It's hard work!!

    Kahy- I agree with you. Depending on the area, there are more condos and apartments being built. The closest you have to a garden plot is possibly a community one or if the local church wants to rent out some of its land for gardening (ours does). Otherwise, an indoor plant/tree or hydroponic garden or an herb pot on the windowsill is the best it gets.

    We don't have much land with our home- about 5000 sq ft and the house takes up most of it. We planted some items and got lucky- tomatoes/strawberries/walnut tree. Most of the flowers bloomed but some cannot tolerate the rain drain off and never blossomed. After replacing them and not getting anywhere, we ended up putting an apple tree there. It's a northern tree that loves heat, water and tolerates sub-zero weather. It's doing well. We planted a peach tree in the back that prefers lots of sun. We didn't cover it for the snow and it survived and has 2 peaches this year! It's been hit or miss with stuff. We have the indoor/outdoor lemon tree. It hates changes in temps and lost most of its leaves but has 2 lemons on it. It's outside tolerating warm days and cool nights.....

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  5. #4
    Registered User KathyB's Avatar
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    Growing up we had a backyard garden. My dad really enjoyed gardening. But he was on of those "don't like any vegetables except potatoes" guys. He was not really into fresh fruit either. And my mom was not really into veggies or fruit that was not part of a pie. And my mom rarely cooked if it was not from a mix. My dad would occasionally open a can of something and heat it on the stove. That was the extent of his cooking. I feel like if they were TV characters instead of my parents I would find it very funny.

    Lots of places around here have tiny yards as well. You don't just buy the house, you buy the land it is on. And land can be expensive here, especially in certain locations. I had a coworker who was looking to more to a nicer neighborhood. Se found her house (except same blueprint of the house she was living in) selling for 50% more in the nicer neighborhood.

    We have little patches of green outside our condo building. I would not call it a yard. Maybe two people could sit on the grass together if they sat really close. But it is nicer than just having the building and parking area.
    KathyB

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    I do a lot of container gardening becasue our HOA doesn't allow for vegetable gardens in the front yards and my back yard is all shade.

    There are allotments that we can apply for which would give us a full garden plot to utilize. This is
    on the back side of one of the city parks. But for our needs, we find that the container gardens are adequate. If we lived in one of the renovated mill buidlings, then we would most likely take advantage of the city garden plots.

    For the economically disadvantaged areas of our city, about 1/4 mile of Community vegetable garden raised beds have been build right into those neighborhoods.
    BS#1 Done
    BS#2 Done
    BS#3 Done
    BS#4 Ongoing
    BS#5 Done
    BS#6 Done
    BS#7 We are here!

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