Theoretical stockpiling rationing question
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  1. #1
    Registered User warramra's Avatar
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    Question Theoretical stockpiling rationing question

    Theoretical questions for all of you who stockpile for survival and SHTF situations:

    How would you ration the food supply within your household in a SHTF scenario? Would you cut back to 2 meals a day? What type of high-calorie/nutritional foods will you make for consuming?

    For us, we have about a 3 month supply of food but could make it last longer if necessary. I want to stockpile more but am running low on room. I'm trying to decide the most efficient foods for us to have on hand and how it would be best to use it. We are a family of 6, with four children 9 & under.

    For us I was thinking that having supplies for two meals per day and having ingredients to make things like oatmeal cookies with dried fruit would be good for a high calorie breakfast. Doing that with our stockpile could actually stretch it out for another month or two.

    Have you given thoughts to how you would use your stockpile?

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    Registered User Debbie-cat's Avatar
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    No snacks. Use everthing possible. 2 meals a day that are really filling.




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    We'd go to 2 meals a day, however I wouldn't want to have to make the kids do that. Dh and I could even go to one meal a day if we had to and in fact, we'd go w/o meals so the kids wouldn't have to. That's one of the reasons why we all need to have a good stockpile.

    We were w/o employment for 2 years and our stockpile got us through almost 1 year. We ate simple meals and used the garden BIGTIME.

    The thing is, DON'T PANIC. Use your stockpile wisely and it will stretch longer than you think. Keep adding to it every month. I'm convinced things will get worse. I think we all need to take one day at a time, work at getting prepared and know that we've done our best.

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    Registered User rosey7415's Avatar
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    my stockpile is pretty pathetic to most of you all on here. i mention that quite a bit.....lol

    i am soo hoping that things never get that bad, and don't worry about that on a daily basis...... but i would think.....or should i say in my thinking....i would stock foods that are ready to eat. ravioli for instance is a meal in a can. at the barest minimum of circumstances......off the grid, i think they say.....no gas, no electric...you can just heat it over an open fire. or eat it cold if you had to. real quick also. canned tuna, peanut butter, etc. could just be put on bread. canned soups, etc. all these things are not the greatest for taste, nutrition, etc. but........what do you all think? i guess i would stock on ready to eat things vs. ingredients that go together......for the most part.......?

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    Registered User sabrelvssammy's Avatar
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    rosey- i gotta tell ya that if the world has gone to the point where the only food you can get is from your stockpile and you have to keep it a secret from everyone to protect yourself and your family...then i think the least of your concerns will be whether it is 'balanced, nutritious, wholesome, or even good for you'....it's nice to think that we could continue on eating 'perfect' food-pyramid diets...but i think the reality of it is...you will just be happy to be able to eat.... i don't think people will be baking many cakes....

    so if its cold ravioli out of a can...it's probably gonna be a much better meal than the majority of the planet is enjoying...so just do the best you can and don't stress too much over it.... as long as you have 'food' you may survive...(i say 'may' coz it may not be the lack of food that gets ya if times get extremely tough out there)....

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    Registered User staceyy's Avatar
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    I'm really scared of this scenario. Dh is a 6'4", 240 lb truck driver. When he is home, he eats us out of house and home! Some days he will eat 3 lunches and he gets up every night in the middle of the night, to eat. At one point I thought I had a year's worth of food stockpiled. He was off for a month due to illness and ate through all the meat within a month! I've since had to drastically increase my stockpiled meat. He complains when I fix beans or casseroles saying, "thats a poor man's meal". He really has a sense of entitlement which upsets me. I worry that he'll be a bear without his preferred food. He also is a smoker and is irritable without his cigarettes. I'm worried about the toll it will take on me if I have to ration or we run out of anything he expects.

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    Registered User rosey7415's Avatar
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    sabrelvssammy.....i agree with you that food may be the least of our worries!! i also am new to stockpiling so i am no expert on anything. i am learning on here with a lot of others. pooling ideas is what is great about this site.

    but.....i was only trying to answer the op questions of "what type of high calorie/nutritional foods will you make?" and " what most efficient foods to have on hand".

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    Registered User warramra's Avatar
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    The scenario I envision in my mind is where food is either impossible to get or due to massive inflation is very, very expensive. So that we are only able to buy very few of the necessities. I'm also not seeing a short-term 'storm' related type of emergency but a long-term hardship.

    Short-term we have cans of ready-to-eat 'chef boyardee' cans in the cabinet. They are fine, but won't last very long. I'm trying to think about the most nutritious way to feed the family for a long-term period.

    Flat and pan-breads can be cooked on a stove. Dried fruits can be added to sweeten. I'm thinking that soups & stews will give us the most caloric/nutritional bang. It has made me think that areas that my stockpile needs to be increased are oatmeal, peanut butter, flour and corn meal, butter, maple syrup, dried fruits, nuts & shortening.

    I don't expect this to happen, I just like to think of the worst survivable case happening. Therefore it is never as bad as I thought it could be

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    Registered User MommyBliss's Avatar
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    One of the reasons we are starting a garden is to make sure I have stock to make soups, etc. I'd also like to start grinding my own wheat, though that's a long way off for me.

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    Registered User fixer's Avatar
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    I applaud you for giving this topic this much thought. It is easy to know what you have in your stockpile. The hard part is knowing how long it must last. I doubt if during an emergency we will know how long it is going to last. That hardest part of dealing with a pro-longed power outage is not knowing will it will return. If you were told two weeks you could plan for it. I am not sure what we would do. For a lengthy event, you would have to be concerned with proper nutrition. Nutrition plays such a large part in keeping the immune system strong that it would be important to eat healthy. During the ice storm, we ate what was convenient to cook and what was easy to clean up. That would not be possible to do over the course of months however. I have something else to think about now.

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    Registered User fuzzybunny's Avatar
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    While I don't think things will get as bad as rationing here is my 2 cents from "What if-ing" about the possibility.

    I agree with the person who said if things got that bad food pyramid type eating would be out the window shortly. I would probably focus on knowing what the major problems due to nutrition deficiancy are and be sure and have items for those i.e vitamin C for scurvy, calcium for rickets, iodized salt etc and then just do the best I could with the rest.

    Now as to the rationing meals, having been in a situation where my family was at one point fishing food out of dumpsters, wildcrafting etc. I would say that it is important to keep in mind that if a true SHTF situation occurs (I'm talking Great Depression Shantytown, "The Road" etc etc) while your heart tells you to sacrifice whatever necessary to keep your children eating 3 meals a day, remember; if the adults don't remain healthy and fueled enough to work then all the sacrificed meals in the world won't keep the children alive if there is no roof over their heads, wood to keep the fire going, folks able to harvest food etc etc.

    In a serious situation an adult enfeebled by starvation cannot continue to provide for their children (and thus keep them alive). We don't like to think of it, but the reality is, in these situations (which I hope none of us will ever experience) the only way a family to get through is by requiring everyone sacrifice as required, adults and children both. There is a reason children grew up so quickly in the past. The extended childhood now common in the developed world is a luxury most of humanity over the course of history could not have indulged even if they wanted to.

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    This isn't a SHTF scene, but when I'm unemployed (which I am now) I cut back to one meal a day. Our stockpile is not a "can" stockpile but real food. Rice, beans, lentils, pasta and tortillas are our standard. I cannot bake bread for the life of me but I do make substantial muffins.

    My once a day meal is pretty substantial, also. It's more than a sandwich and I prefer hot as it seems like it is more food than it is and I make sure I drink milk with it as it seems to last longer / no hunger.

    I can't cut back more than a meal a day, though, as I get really shaky.

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    1. Any emergency is a SHTF situation.... Loss of income, unexpected medical expenses, natural or man-made disasters, interrupted food supplies, water shortages or water contamination, power outages... If you prepare for those situations, then anything worse has a better chance of being covered.

    2. Consume a variety of foods everyday to provide a wide spectrum of nutrition. That's why we have a year's supply of food that covers ALL the food groups, not just 2-years worth of rice in storage.

    3. You'll feel better if you eat 2-3 small meals throughout the day, rather than one large meal. Your blood sugar levels will thank you. When you do eat, take a bite and put your fork down. Chew the food completely and swallow before you pick up the fork to take another bite. You'll be surprised how much fuller you will feel on a smaller amount of food.

    4. My #1 "food" for emergency use are CHIA SEEDS. If I only had time to grab one food, it would be chia seeds. I always keep at least 5# of these in storage - and 5# is a lot - they are a little bigger than a poppy seed. Chewing on a chia seeds (or mixing them in water or juice) will provide you with energy, stamina, and endurance. Indians would run from the Colorado River area to the California coast to trade turquoise for seashells and would ONLY bring Chia Seeds for their nourishment. I put Chia Seed Gel (water and chia seeds) in all my homemade breads to increase the nutrition and fiber.

    5. What can you grow? In the middle of winter you can make your own fresh veggies in a quart jar if you have seeds/beans for sprouting. In March I'll be able to start peas, potatoes, and under my cold-frame I'll start lettuce and spinach. Keeping garden seeds in storage is also a good move.

    6. Wheat in storage. A person could live on wheat alone because there are so many ways you can fix it. When it's combined with any other grain, dairy product, potatoes, seeds or nuts it makes a complete protein. I can also make "fake" meat (seitan/gluten) from wheat.

    A person's daily nutritional requirements could be met with 4-cups of wheat. Cooked and eaten - 3-1/2 cups and 1/2 c. sprouts.

    7. Your body is only fed with nutrition, not empty calories. That's why the bulk of my storage foods are whole foods high in nutrition. There's little nutrition in bleached/unbleached flour, while there are 25 vitamins, minerals, protein and high fiber in flour freshly-milled from wheat.

    8. Emergency cooking -
    I consider homemade tortillas the ultimate easy-to-fix bread that works for every meal of the day, and can also be used for snacks. That supply of honey, jams and jellies work great on a tortilla. Tortillas can be cooked in nearly any type of pan over almost any type of heat - bbq, open fire, gas grill, etc. Add to that refried beans and you have a complete protein.

    I keep pinto beans (black beans work as well) in storage and when I mill them into bean flour I can make "instant" refried beans in a few minutes by adding water and cooking the bean flour.

    I cook black beans, rice, whole grains, or oatmeal in a Thermos. Thermos cooking only requires boiling water.

    I have 2 solar ovens I can use for cooking and baking, but you can find instructions on-line for making a solar oven with a pizza box. Not as efficient as a real one, but it may be handy in an emergency.

    9. Dairy products. I'd suggest a whey-based milk substitute - Morning Moo's (www.moosmilk.com). It has a very long shelf-life, but we use it for everyday use.

    Another brand I'd suggest having in storage is NIDO (a Nestle product) whole dry milk if you have children. I find it at Wal-Mart in the Latino section. Children need the fat in whole milk, rather than non-fat dry milk. Non-fat dry milk powder from the grocery store isn't what I consider a good storage item either. It deteriorates quickly during storage, and very quickly after it's opened.

    You can also make milk substitutes from rice and nuts. Almond milk is very high in calcium.

    10. We provide for snack foods in our food storage. The "ton" of free apples we dehydrate every fall. We keep a large quantity of popcorn in storage. It makes a great snack, is very filling, it's a wholegrain food, and it's a great comfort food. Our supply of vacuum-sealed nuts and peanuts are also considered snack foods. Dried fruits of all kinds are great as snacks. Homemade granola is also considered a snack food. Notice how all these foods are also nutritious and high in fiber. Fiber is very filling. When I make cornmeal pancakes from freshly-milled cornmeal, we're so full after one pancake we eat a very small lunch. Something like an apple, 10-12 almonds, stalk or two of celery and a piece of cheese or yogurt.

    11. Foraging. There are foods all around us if we know what to look for. I have wild onions growing in our back yard. Soon there will be wild lettuce and wild carrots, not to mention dandelions and poke weed. I grow amaranth and use it for a cooked breakfast cereal and added to baked goods, but it's wild cousin is Pig Weed. You can consume the early leaves off amaranth AND pig weeds, so that's a source for a fresh vegetable, as well as the seeds these plants produce in the fall.
    Last edited by Grainlady; 02-24-2009 at 06:23 PM.

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    Registered User sunshine's Avatar
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    Zuni traveling food is our source of emergency rations for long term. . . light, filling , nutritious.

    In a real SHTF scenerio, your caloric requirements are going to be more. . . you'll expend more energy for survival.

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    I try to keep a 3 month supply of meals (breakfast, lunch, and dinner), but in the event of a serious situation, this would probably stretch to closer to 6 months. This is because the amounts I usually cook for dinners is enough for leftovers for lunch the next day or 2 days worth of dinner.

    I would make sure to put extra helpings in tupperware and out of sight so DH wouldn't be tempted to double up on servings and in general keep our portion sizes reasonable. If the electricity was out, I would be processing frozen and refrigerated things into canning jars if that became necessary.

    We also keep seeds on hand, so if it was an extended crisis we'd be able to grow some fresh veggies as well.

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