Doomsday Preppers - a new series - Page 4
Page 4 of 9 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 133
  1. #46
    Registered User NicJean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Vermont
    Age
    47
    Posts
    476
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Blog Entries
    12
    Rep Power
    12

    Smile

    Bent - don't forget anysize order from Honeyville ships for just 5.49 anytime.

    MissouriAngel - First step is to decide to prepare. Second step - write large goal lists, break that down into smaller goals. I didn't get my entire stockpile at once, it's taken years, and I'm continually tweaking it. I also keep inventory/usage diaries - I know it takes me three or four months to use up a roll of paper towels in the kitchen, but DH uses the select a size ones as tissues, so he uses up two rolls a month - I can plan to go through 28 rolls a year, buy on sale (hopefully) with a coupon, and forget about it for a looong time. Dial soap, the original, gold one- my favorite - is getting harder to locate, when I find it, on sale, I buy 30 bars at a time (although I know I'll use only 4-5 a year).

    I don't buy into most of the wacko scenarios - but, I work in a school. This winter, kids, parents and staff have been getting a bug that's knocking them out for three weeks. I couldn't afford not to work three weeks. If say, a flu epidemic occurs, the US government plans to enforce quarantines for 12 - 16 weeks. Do you have enough supplies on hand for that length of time? I sleep soundly, and have have peace because I know I'm covered on the basics.

    My Stepmom will be having a mastectomy, and will be out of work for several weeks, my Dad was afraid he was losing his job - their double income family unit will be down to less than half of the "normal, budgeted" income for at least a few months. Having cleaning supplies and food in the house is one less thing they have to worry about, and this "scenario" happened without warning.

    To me, it makes sense to have at least a little something set aside. But, I've grown up in Germany - where after Chernobyl, there was NO milk, fruit or fresh veggies for months(everything outside was 'contaminated'), also in the Northeast US, where we lose power and have winter storms, I lived through the Loma Prieta earthquake in California (Highschool) where getting around, even in the immediate neighborhood was iffy - nevermind trying to get to a grocery, and without power for weeks.

    How to start? When you run out of something, rather than buying one replacement, get two. Or, if it's on sale, get three, or four. When you have enough for a couple extra meals, don't buy any more until there is a great sale, then buy enough to last three months, or a year, or whatever.

  2. #47
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    not here
    Posts
    4,575
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    58

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NicJean View Post


    To me, it makes sense to have at least a little something set aside. But, I've grown up in Germany - where after Chernobyl, there was NO milk, fruit or fresh veggies for months(everything outside was 'contaminated'), also in the Northeast US, where we lose power and have winter storms, I lived through the Loma Prieta earthquake in California (Highschool) where getting around, even in the immediate neighborhood was iffy - nevermind trying to get to a grocery, and without power for weeks.
    Thank you.
    These types of scenarios/challenges make more sense to me than trying to plan for a world wide destruction.
    ~Russ

  3. #48
    Registered User greekislandgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Greece
    Age
    39
    Posts
    1,281
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    17

    Default

    I wish that show were on here in Greece. I think a lot of people here have absolutely no idea what to do to prepare for what is coming and is most likely a matter of weeks or months, not years. I understand the wacky/extreme cases make for better TV, but there's always something to be learned. I'd like to watch that, I'll look around to see if it's available online.

    Here I've been planning and stockpiling and reading up on prepping for an economic collapse, imagining myself much better prepared than everyone else, and what actually happens? No running water because of frozen pipes, and we had to rely on our neighbors to help us! You NEVER know what it will be.

    I think the best thing we can do is develop skills, develop relationships with useful people, stay in shape/healthy, and keep a low profile. Those would be helpful in pretty much any scenario.

    In Argentina after the collapse, the people who lived in rural areas were in a much worse position than urban and suburban dwellers - that was something I took into consideration when we decided to move to the city. The fantasy of living in a rural compound and being totally self sufficient is just that... when looting and violence gets bad, rural people were the biggest targets - isolated, slower police response, more likely to have resources worth stealing, poor lighting at night, etc.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    FrugalVillage.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #49
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    not here
    Posts
    4,575
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    58

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by greekislandgirl View Post
    In Argentina after the collapse, the people who lived in rural areas were in a much worse position than urban and suburban dwellers -
    How so, other than slow police response?
    ~Russ

  6. #50
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Age
    60
    Posts
    164
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by greekislandgirl View Post

    Here I've been planning and stockpiling and reading up on prepping for an economic collapse, imagining myself much better prepared than everyone else, and what actually happens? No running water because of frozen pipes, and we had to rely on our neighbors to help us! You NEVER know what it will be.

    I think the best thing we can do is develop skills, develop relationships with useful people, stay in shape/healthy, and keep a low profile. Those would be helpful in pretty much any scenario.

    In Argentina after the collapse, the people who lived in rural areas were in a much worse position than urban and suburban dwellers - that was something I took into consideration when we decided to move to the city. The fantasy of living in a rural compound and being totally self sufficient is just that... when looting and violence gets bad, rural people were the biggest targets - isolated, slower police response, more likely to have resources worth stealing, poor lighting at night, etc.
    Well, you have a point there! However, I'm rural because Everybody in our neighborhood has 1 1/4 acres of land. Some have more but most of the lots were divided that way.

    Most of the people here own guns. The reason I know is because you hear them on a regular basis.

    Most people here look out for their neighbors and strange cars in the neighborhood.

    Water is a necessity and is more important than dried food or toilet paper. We will set up to collect rainwater and purify it...just in case. It's also possible to can it.

    Backwoodsgirl

  7. #51
    Registered User greekislandgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Greece
    Age
    39
    Posts
    1,281
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Russ View Post
    How so, other than slow police response?
    when looting and violence gets bad, rural people were the biggest targets - isolated, slower police response, more likely to have resources worth stealing, poor lighting at night, etc.
    keybrd broken, can't write more now, will post when i can

  8. #52
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Age
    60
    Posts
    164
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    9

    Default

    Sorry your keyboard is busted but I want to reassure you of the following:

    1) We are rural, but probably not in the same sense of the word that most people think of. We are right outside of a major metro area.

    2) We are not isolated. The lots are 80' wide. They are deep, but not too wide. We can shout howdy to our neighbor's neighbor. The town we live in used to have it's own charter. Historically, it was considered part of a boom town; however it lost it's charter and now is sort of relegated to being 'distant cousins' to the main city.

    3) Our town has a reputation for being tough. About 15 years ago, an outsider couldn't move in here without their house being burned down within 24 hrs. Of course, they were nice enough to give them notice, but they only gave them the one chance to get out.

    Pretty much, we handle our own problems out here. If there was anyplace that still resembled the wild, wild west, I reckon this place would do it, LOL!

    Backwoodsgirl

  9. #53
    Registered User greekislandgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Greece
    Age
    39
    Posts
    1,281
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    17

    Default

    on Dh's pc

    I can't speak for anyone else's situation obviously but since we're staring down the face of a national default, I look at what happened after the Argentine national default. There, urban dwellers had it much better than rural dwellers (including small towns). Services are extremely limited, so are completely unavailable outside of major urban areas. No police, no ambulances, no fire trucks, no surgeons and hospitals, no foreign humanitarian aid deliveries or airlifted food, no truck with a speaker driving around giving news after comm lines are down, no ability to walk to doctor, pharmacy, etc.

    I grew up in a prepper's rural fantasy land - we were pretty self sufficient. We had our own exclusive water supply, generators to pump the water, solar to heat it, our own forest for wood, underground gasoline tanks to power chainsaws to cut the wood and woodstoves for heat and cooking, acres and acres of cultivated land for food production, a swimming pool for staying cool w/o AC, a greenhouse, a huge woodshop and garage, well kept older cars, several SUVs, a truck, a huge tractor, several large propane tanks, a resident doctor and pharmacist (dad), a weaver with looms who carded, dyed, and spun wool, wove fabric, and sewed clothing (mom), a talented furniture maker with welding, roofing, construction, engineering, electrical, and plumbing certifications and/or experience (dad). We had too many deer and we ate them, my brother had a silent weapon (compound bow and arrows) and kept up his skills.

    So I've lived it. And I know that there are chinks in anyone's armor. In an economic collapse of the sort we are looking at here in Greece, I think it's going to go down like it did in Argentina, so I'm interested in how things played out in Argentina specifically. There, it turned out that the best place to be was in a wealthy gated community with armed security in Buenos Aires. After that, if you couldn't afford that, best was to be in a medium sized city that could provide you with community, public services like ambulances, hospitals, schools, fire trucks, police, political leverage, and communications. The rural areas including small towns and villages became massively depopulated as people surged into the cities to look for work (very bad unemployment), leaving the people who stayed behind very thin on the ground and prime pickings for thieves who considered them the best bet of having something worth stealing and of being unlikely to have police show up in time. They also had pretty much no political representation, they were considered rich because of the land and taxed a lot because of it. I posted a little more about this topic on my 'diary' thread: https://www.frugalvillage.com/forums/...post4111502729

    I've lived in a very rural part of Greece where people have died because the local doctor couldn't convince the authorities to spend the money to send an evac helicopter. That's what happens in economic collapse.

  10. #54
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    SW VA
    Posts
    1,109
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    19

    Default

    I remember reading a blog by an man who lived through the collapse. He talked about the armed gangs that terrorized, tortured and killed the people out on the farms and ranches because they couldn't defend themselves against so many. Very sad and scary.

    We are rural but not isolated. Neighbors look out for each other here too. Everybody has guns because they hunt or protect their gardens, etc.

  11. #55
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Age
    60
    Posts
    164
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    9

    Default

    All good points to consider. I still can't believe you left that to go to a city!!!!

    Ya know, life happens. I could cross the street and get run over by a semi truck going down the main road a mile from here.

    Or, I could die in my sleep.

    I'm not prepping so much because I'm afraid of what's going to happen, but because I know what's going to happen and the government isn't going to be saving anybody.

    We are almost bankrupt now.

    I remember an ice storm that hit back when I was in my late teens. I remember it because I was pregnant and slipped on the ice. They got me to the emergency room and the halls were full of people on gurneys. They were waiting for transport to the Mental Hospital because they didn't have any room.

    The situation was so bad that they literally sent me home and showed my husband how to pack me in ice to keep me from bleeding to death. They also showed him how to tell if my stomach was cold enough to stop the bleeding. Flip me like a watermelon.

    They covered the bed in trash bags, He and a neighbor had to cut ice from the streets to pack me in, so they packed me in ice, put another layer of plastic over that and covered me up. That and some salt tablets is what kept me from bleeding to death.

    I don't rely upon doctors and hospitals. I've learned enough that I know what to do in a lot of situations. If it comes to something major, in a disaster they would probably die anyway. But for stuff like sewing somebody up, or staunching the flow of blood, setting somebody's leg if it got broken, removing a bullet or something. That I can do.

    If it comes to fighting infections, that I can do too and I teach those around me as I go along. Most people are willing to learn.

    Backwoodsgirl

  12. #56
    Registered User greekislandgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Greece
    Age
    39
    Posts
    1,281
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Backwoodsgirl View Post
    All good points to consider. I still can't believe you left that to go to a city!!!!
    No jobs. ZERO. Nothing to do but that stuff. I moved to a city to go to college, then graduate school and work, then I moved here because, well, I really wanted to live in Greece. too bad I picked the wrong decade to do so The island was achingly beautiful but we're happier in town, despite the deterioration in the quality and security of life here.

    Ya know, life happens. I could cross the street and get run over by a semi truck going down the main road a mile from here.

    Or, I could die in my sleep.
    Absolutely true!! Another thing about the extreme preppers that I don't get. We all have to go somehow, sometime. I just figure I'd rather be someplace where I can go to the doctor if I have to, rather than turning it into an overnight-in-a-hotel affair like my parents have to now, because at their age they can't handle the round trip in a day. But if I have to wear a gas mask and sleep in an underground bunker to survive, I'm not so sure that's the kind of life I'd like to be living at all. I don't consider myself special, and if half the population is wiped out, I don't assume I should be in the half that isn't.

    Your experience sounds awfully traumatic. thank goodness you made it through that. It's great that you have medical skills. My skills are very limited, I have a lot of pharmaceutical knowledge but that's it. I don't know how to handle pretty much any injuries. My father has extensive pharmacognosy knowledge (I think that's what it's called... medicinal plants/herbs, anyway) and I was acutely aware growing up just how few of the useful ones grew where we lived.

  13. #57
    Registered User greekislandgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Greece
    Age
    39
    Posts
    1,281
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    17

    Default

    I don't think I mentioned on this thread - I saw two of the episodes. They're available online I'm going to continue watching them. I enjoyed them so far. I think they are prepping for generalized SHTF stuff but the show is making it out that they each have a fetish scenario (Mr. Solar Flares, Ms. Mississippi Earthquake) - I don't buy it. They put so much emphasis on weaponry, something I put out of my mind but probably shouldn't.

  14. #58
    Registered User annymoll's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    3,255
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    24

    Default

    I would not want to be in a populated area that was teeming with unemployed transients during a pandemic.Community services would break down very quickly and the armed security would make sure that people would not leave the boundries of the quarantined areas. No one has to plan for a Doomsday scenerio .Prepping in the exteme does not shock me, frighten me or amuse me as much as people who do nothing to plan for the future- physically, financially or spiritually.Anyone who plans ahead for times of trouble isn't doing something novel . They are doing something as old as the hills. Some people prepare , plan and save in different fashions. It is empowering to take charge of what you can, to do the best with what you have under your own circumstances, and then hope for the best.It is living with the hope for a future, in spite of bad times.Cherish yesterday, plan for tomorrow, live today.

  15. #59
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    13,930
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Blog Entries
    25
    Rep Power
    88

    Default

    I know that this Doomsday Preppers is a show. But watching it the first thing that strikes me is that these people they've shown have (for the most part) a very myopic view. They have food for a decade but are so out of shape they can't move fast to run and must surely depend on prescription meds. I can't imagine most of them could last more than 3 months.
    Also, living in an urban setting I would worry less about my neighbors then random people who wandered in to find food or shelter. I would worry about a desperate person driving a car headlong into the house to get food while i slept. I would worry if I could be down and dirty enough to do some of the things necessary and if I could live w/ who I'd become. I would worry someone would eat my dogs. A lot of people veiw this like a game. I worry about how much of a deficit I would be up against because I am bound by christian moralities and that is not a handicap a lot of others would have.

    At this point I would like to suggest Patriotnurse its on utube prepper videos. She has videos on medical kits in 3 levels and does a chilling scenerios about how long certain groups would live from a medical perspective. A bit chilling.

  16. #60
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    13,930
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Blog Entries
    25
    Rep Power
    88

    Default

    I also wanted to add that a friend of my DH's who worked at the same company lives in Argentina. He happened to be out when the riots hit. He was beaten w/ a baseball bat and needed medical attention. They had taken his wallet w/ all his ID,medical card and money and his assets were froze. My DH arranged medical care thru the company so he could go to the hospital.
    It all happened fast. He is just lucky his wife and child were home and that his house wasn't overrun.

Page 4 of 9 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. What do you think about preppers???
    By 227melissa in forum General Chat
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 04-25-2012, 08:50 PM
  2. Wyoming is staring to think about Doomsday....
    By Jamauk in forum Preparedness and Survival
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 02-27-2012, 11:49 AM
  3. Article about doomsday shelters & preparedness
    By Trishagirl in forum Preparedness and Survival
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 03-27-2011, 03:07 AM
  4. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 09-27-2008, 12:00 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •