were do I start to become more prepared - Page 3
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  1. #31
    Registered User BlissMommy's Avatar
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    Hubby and I are so behind on this. I have so much to do to get caught up.

  2. #32
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    Take it one step at a time. Do the basics. Water. Food. Shelter. Security.
    Start at that and go on from there.
    Start at a doable limit ( like... 3months worth of food) and once thats done move it to 6 months,etc.


    I would suggest to folks to get water bobs. They're plastic "containers" that you lay in your tub and then fill with water. They also have small ones for sinks.
    You have to have water. It's THE priority IMO. I go with 2 gallons per person per day. And thats the least amount.

  3. #33
    Registered User Uniwolf's Avatar
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    Frug- thank you for the reminder Water is my big hole in my stockpile. I hate, hate, hate our water here. It taste HORRIBLE. In a SHTF senerrio I am sure I would deal. But I need to up the amount of bottled water that I have on hand too.

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  5. #34
    Registered User pollypurebred39's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Backwoodsgirl View Post
    For just running around the house and out in the yard, get a pattern that has drawstring shorts and pants. You can find fabric at Walmart for $1 a yd. sometimes. Other times, you can find solid colored sheets at the thrift stores. That's a lot of cheap fabric and if the only people that see you are the chickens, then who cares if they have store labels?

    The same pattern for the pants and shorts can be used for summer clothes as well as winter pajama pants made out of flannel. Or try some patchwork. If your hubby's flannel shirts get worn out, salvage them and use some scraps to patchwork some flannel shorts or pants.

    Also, since I lost so much weight, I can now buy larger sized clothing at thrift stores and cut it down for more than one item. Like sew a shirt or shorts and use the scraps for trim to make a matching outfit.

    Backwoodsgirl
    Thank You Backwoodsgirl

    Your post made me think that maybe I could take apart an existing pair of pajamas with a seam ripper. Then lay them out on freezer paper, and trace them, adding an allowance after. I don't see much difference in them and shorts. I'd have to shorten the pant legs though. Hmmmm.....I've lots of fabric, sheets and such.

    My DH's old flannel shirts I cut up into squares and use for baby wipes, or furniture wipes. But I can certainly divert some of the material for patchwork. I have made patchwork panels of material before by hand sewing pieces together. Easy, peasy, but takes forever by hand.

    Cutting down clothing is a great idea too.

    I've taken the sewing out of the equation (for now) when it comes to homemade swiffer pads, tissues, paper towels, baby wipes, etc. I just cut material that does not fray into squares to fit. Tissues are made from t-shirts. Swiffers made from fleece. Furniture wipes made from flannel (slow to fray, I use pinking shears). Baby wipes are made from t-shirts.

  6. #35
    Registered User pollypurebred39's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oheoh's momma View Post
    polly honey u didn't jack my thread..u asked all the questions I would have... My only comment is I am never goping to be debt free..... I am only paying mininum .....the future is more imporant to me than debt....

    yes we made string beans and apples... thought about old tires for beds.. we live in city limits so know chickens.... but I am gonna learn to do more to make my family more sustainable...

    Thank u Mr. fixit for the info about the beans.. we are not sure about guns but are thinking it over..we are not against them I have a fear of them... so we are getting baseball bats...

    am going to learn how to can, preserve, dehydrate, make my own swiffers and other items to free the pocketbook for more long term things...I even want a wash board... for hard times..

    thank u all
    O's Mom

    LOVE that you did the string beans and apples. Never knew anyone else that did that.

    I've been toying with the idea of tires too. I've a very limited budget so any container is a good container to me. I've some 5 gallon food buckets I'll be using, some big tree buckets in the garage. 2 long planters, some totes, a grow box in the basement (gift from a friend many moons ago, never used) I'm also laying down gigantic tarps for the containers to sit on. My version of walkways and paths in the garden, except the plants will be sitting on top. There will be no grass to contend with, no little critters crawling up from the soil into the containers. Will it be pretty? Heck no, but I'm not in the least worried about pretty. I'm only concerned with building and growing a garden that is as trouble free as possible.

  7. #36
    Super Moderator Spirit Deer's Avatar
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    Tarps can be very slippery when they're wet, so be careful.

  8. #37
    Registered User pollypurebred39's Avatar
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    Thanks SD, very good to know. I'd hate to take a spill out in the garden. It's the only no cost/low cost option that I can think of for such a large garden. I must do something as I need to make this as low maintenance as possible. There's just no way I can keep up with lawn maintenance in between garden rows. On the lower land, where my DH's garden plots are, he cut and laid down old carpet in between the garden rows last year. It will last for years, much better than the cardboard he had laid down.

    Maybe in the years following I can work it out that it's boxed in, tarps down and gravel over top. It's just not going to happen this year though. We don't have enough lumber in the garage, or bricks available to box it in. Then of course there's gravel, I just can't see fitting that in the garden budget this year. I think as each year passes it will be easier to build a proper container garden as I'll continue to keep certain things, like the dirt and containers. Since we have a huge compost pile we just mix it in our soil and we get some nice soil going, so I don't see us replacing soil. If I get tires for containers, my Grandmother kept hers for as long as I can remember. Do you remember the tire flower planters of the 70's?

    How to Make a Tire Planter Flower Pot | gardenswag

  9. #38
    Super Moderator Spirit Deer's Avatar
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    It makes me sore just to think about wrestling with a tire to try to turn it inside out. And cutting them with a serrated knife? Are they kidding? That I'd pay to see. They're cute though. A lot of places will give you tires for free since it would save them from having to haul them out. Tractor tires make great sandboxes for kids to play in.

    Have you looked into square foot gardening? That wouldn't have any pathways.

    I think sticking with containers as much as you can is a good idea. Be sure to expand your definition of 'container' while you're at it. I have a double stainless steel sink sitting out in back to plant spinach in this year, set up on two steel chair frames we salvaged. I also have three galvanized, lidless, dinged-up little trash cans bought cheap at a rummage sale to use as planters. Two old-fashioned wash tubs on a stand. A table garden made from scrap lumber and an old door. A potato planter made from a washer drum that came from the local appliance recycle place. A laundry tub for more potatoes. Weird stuff like old wringer washers and old barbecue grills make nice planters, too. If something is too big and deep, I add plastic gallon milk jugs with the lid on to fill up some space in the bottom so the dirt doesn't cost as much. They can be squished a little if needed. Most plants only need about six inches of dirt, although of course root crops like potatoes and carrots need a little more depth.

    Don't be afraid to ask on Freecycle or on construction sites for scrap lumber. Usually you're doing people a favor to take what they don't want. I'm always grateful to the recipient when I can give away some of my clutter to someone on Freecycle, and construction companies just have to pay to haul things out, so it saves them money if someone will take it instead. Win-win for everyone.

  10. #39
    Registered User pollypurebred39's Avatar
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    I've not researched square foot gardening. But we are now actively seeking out old pallets for my DH to take apart and make planters. He's made them before. 2 pallets put the planters at the PERFECT height for growing most vegetables and they can be spaced perfectly as the mower can go through between the rows and not throw grass all over the plants and planters. My DH wants to make things as easy as possible for me with my back issues.

    YES! on the odd containers, I'm on the look out everywhere for whatever I can find to use as containers. LOVE the plastic jugs in the bottom of deep planters. What a great idea!

  11. #40
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    I think they make it overly complicated but here's some square foot gardening info. No doubt someone will start up a thread about it before long somewhere on the forum. IMO, containers set on pallets would be just as good for most things. Your library probably has the SFG book you could look at.
    Square Foot Gardening Store | Raised Bed Planters, Square Foot Gardening Grids, Square Foot Gardening Boxes

    If you have a nearby place that recycles metal and they let you salvage from it like we can here, you might want to drop by there sometime and see what you see. We usually see gas grills and stuff like that at ours.

    Appliance drawers can make good containers, too. Even stuff like the bottom drawers on stoves. If they're waterproof, you can drill through enamel and make some holes in the bottom. Ask around at places that prepare food (delis, restaurants, bakeries) and see if any of them have plastic pails they want to get rid of. They can be used for planters by drilling holes in the bottom.

    I wish we could get pallets here. Not much manufacturing so not many pallets available, at least that I know of.

  12. #41
    Registered User shp1055's Avatar
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    Cherry tomatoes almost grow themselves around here. You can dehydrate them until they are VERY dry and put them in the food processer to make "tomato powder". Doesn't have to be canned or frozen and doesn't take up much space. Google "how to use tomato powder" and you'll find how to reconstitute it for various products. Cheap is the name of the game with me.

  13. #42
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    Polly my moomy wanted one of those pretty tires but she got regualr ole tire....

    gonna start on my beds this weekend cleaning them out......Now just get everybody to agree... I want beans on the fence.. grandma wants roses ....ugh

  14. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by pollypurebred39 View Post
    Thanks SD, very good to know. I'd hate to take a spill out in the garden. It's the only no cost/low cost option that I can think of for such a large garden. I must do something as I need to make this as low maintenance as possible. There's just no way I can keep up with lawn maintenance in between garden rows. On the lower land, where my DH's garden plots are, he cut and laid down old carpet in between the garden rows last year. It will last for years, much better than the cardboard he had laid down.

    Maybe in the years following I can work it out that it's boxed in, tarps down and gravel over top. It's just not going to happen this year though. We don't have enough lumber in the garage, or bricks available to box it in. Then of course there's gravel, I just can't see fitting that in the garden budget this year. I think as each year passes it will be easier to build a proper container garden as I'll continue to keep certain things, like the dirt and containers. Since we have a huge compost pile we just mix it in our soil and we get some nice soil going, so I don't see us replacing soil. If I get tires for containers, my Grandmother kept hers for as long as I can remember. Do you remember the tire flower planters of the 70's?

    How to Make a Tire Planter Flower Pot | gardenswag
    If you ever drive down the street and see used carpeting...there ya go! It makes great weed block and it doesn't slip and slide around and it won't disintegrate in the sun!!! It should last you several years without any problem.

    All you need is a razor knife to cut it up or just lay the pots or tires on top of it.

    If you use tires for containers make sure you paint the tires because those suckers get hot in the sun! I know from experience.

    Backwoodsgirl

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