Advice on starting a stockpile for real
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  1. #1
    Registered User InDiAnNa's Avatar
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    Default Advice on starting a stockpile for real

    Future DH and I are moving house on Saturday, and I'm treating it as a new start. Gonna start kicking the debt, be super-frugal, start knitting again , home-made Christmas presents, tiny baby EF, the lot.

    I've always had a few bits extra in the cupboards and freezer food-wise, so could be classed as a small stockpile I guess, but I want to do it properly so we're never without groceries, laundry stuff, toiletries, kitty food/litter etc for times when we can't spend

    In the new house, I'm lucky to have two large cupboards set apart on their own, which I've designated the stockpile cupboards, and a fridge freezer is provided so I can use our half freezer for the stockpile (all utilities and bills are included in the rent so don't need to worry about the cost of running the two).

    So... How do I start it exactly? And how should I go about it? Do I get one extra of everything that I usually buy, buy when on sale, buy when got vouchers/coupons, or all of the above? And how on earth do I keep track of it all?


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    Registered User itlw8's Avatar
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    When things come in I write the date on the outside with black marker then I can easily make sure things are rotated...

    If I can easily see what is on the shelf I do not write it down but I try to keep an inventory in a notbook for what is in the freezer.

    Laundry detergent and bath things Walgreens has been an easy way to stock up While the regular prices are high Register rewards and the Easy saver rebates are wonderful. buy more with the money you save

    If cereal does not have a coupon and a sale we rarely buy it.

    Same with convience foods.. while my freezer has more of those than is healthy they were all bought on sale with a coupon and are rationed. having a deep freeze allows me to do this.

  3. #3
    Registered User cheles2kids's Avatar
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    InDiAnNa, to the world of stockpiling & to living more frugally.

    I can't begin to imagine how excited you are on your new home & new storage!!!
    Just be forewarned, stockpiling can be addicting once you get started!

    There have been sooo many great threads talking about stockpiling, and there's just to much useful information for me to repeat, and I surely don't want you to miss any of the great advice from everyone here.
    What I would like to suggest to you is to access the "search" tab at the top of your page and type in stockpiling.
    Then it will find all related threads that talk about getting started, the best way to store your items, how to keep up with rotating your stockpile, etc.

    I've found that I use a mix of everyone else's system.
    I pull from other people's experiences and then that has helped me to create the system that works best for my family.

    Please, if you have any other questions, please feel free to ask.
    If you have any problems whatsoever finding the threads, don't hesitate to let me know!

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  5. #4

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    Buy what you can on sale or with coupons as much as you can. But don't feel bad when you can't.

    My advice is to start slow. Have a set weekly grocery budget, it may allow for any pet, personal, bathroom, laundry, or general household needs or just be strictly for food.

    When you can, and without going over your budget grab a few extra cans of veggies. I make it a general rule if I need to purchase 1, I purchase 2.. Grab and extra package of pasta, an extra bottle of laundry detergent, an extra pack of toilet paper.....you get the idea. After awhile you'll get to the point of having enough stocked around your house, that you won't actually need to purchase many food items during certain weeks, use your budgeted money anyway (unless you need to pay off some debt instead) to go ahead and buy more grocery items even if you didn't need them that week. Buy meat when it's on sale and stock your freezer. Buy extra bags of flour and keep in the freezer. Shampoos when you see them buy one get one free, Grab a few bottles.

    Just use your own judgement on what your family will use. Don't overstock to the point of wasting. And do not bother stocking what you won't use, don't overstock on things that will go bad or stale. Most importantly eat what you stock periodically and replace what you eat. Pull your older items to the front for using and place the newer in the back.

    Everyone is different on what they put back and stock up on, find out what works for you and your storage areas and good luck!

  6. #5
    Registered User dcompton's Avatar
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    I found in one of the stockpiling threads an idea for rotating that I really liked. I can't credit it because I don't remember whose it was, but if the mystery poster reads this, pause a moment while I applaud.

    I never do the back to front - it's just too much work and I'm always tired after the shopping. But she rotated left to right (or the other way around), moving the older cans of, say, green beans, over and adding the newer ones to the vacated space. That is SO much easier. At least I found it was. Of course, you won't have rows and rows until your stockpile has grown and grown, but I offer it as something to keep in mind.

    I started mine a little differently, but I had a chunk of money I could use at once - I started a really serious stockpile with some of the tax rebate. What I bought first, in quantity, was stuff I use often, but that is almost never on sale. I knew it would only increase in price, with no relief from sales or coupons. But generally, you stock in the way the others have suggested - with sales, coupons, adding a little extra here and there, which is more or less what I do now, since I have a core stock in place.

    I'm jealous. I wish I had two big new cupboards!

  7. #6
    Registered User Jeanna's Avatar
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    The first thing I would do is to set down and make a list of things you know you use regularly and then try to figure out how much you use or how long it lasts. This may be something you have to work on over time. One of the best ways to figure out how much to stockpile is to write the date you open/start using something and then when it is finished figure how many days/weeks it lasted. By that you can figure out how many you will need for how ever long you wish your stockpile to last. Second I would start going to the local grocers websites each week and see what is on sale for that week. Of course don't waste gas running all over town but pick 2 or 3 places that are close and shop these. Set aside a set amount of money each week that will go for stock up and try to match these with the sales and any coupons you might have. These are the first steps I took when I started mine many many years ago and it worked great. If I keep on top of it I never truly run out of anything other than perishable items.

  8. #7
    Registered User Bournecrazy's Avatar
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    where are you moving to, to get all that?

    ive not long started, i found it easier to do my shopping list wth the online stores and it has all the ofers and sales on i look thru them for items i use / need and get a few extra and just leave one or two out and put the rest in the stockpile, mine is only small butyou can pck up very cheap pasta (and it tastes just as good) for £0.18 a packet (500g) so i stock up on items like that, it will take a while to get a good stockpile going

    keeps tabs on how much of everything you eat during a month or week then you know how much to get on an item then you will know how long it will last for
    Last edited by Bournecrazy; 10-02-2008 at 09:28 AM.

  9. #8
    Registered User InDiAnNa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bournecrazy View Post
    where are you moving to, to get all that?

    ive not long started, i found it easier to do my shopping list wth the online stores and it has all the ofers and sales on i look thru them for items i use / need and get a few extra and just leave one or two out and put the rest in the stockpile, mine is only small butyou can pck up very cheap pasta (and it tastes just as good) for £0.18 a packet (500g) so i stock up on items like that, it will take a while to get a good stockpile going

    keeps tabs on how much of everything you eat during a month or week then you know how much to get on an item then you will know how long it will last for
    You shop at Asda too then?!! Don't know how I didn't notice that their cheapest own brand was that cheap, I've been buying bigger bags for faaar much more!!

    We live in London, and we are going to be paying £1000 (c. $2000) per month for the new place, rather than £1300 (c. $2600) per month for our current home. Although we are getting a good deal rentwise having all bills included (for London anyway!!!), we're still gritting our teeth every time something goes out of the bank account... Can't wait for our wedding, then we start plans to leave the UK and live very, very differently.

    Since clearing out the cupboards whilst packing, I have found LOADS of tins and packets that I forgot I had, spaghetti, beans, pudding rice, yeast, flour, noodles... I've got a mini stockpile in itself from that!

    Which remind me, I should be packing, not sat on here...

    Thanks for all the pointers, if anyone else has any, please add!

  10. #9
    Registered User Lady_V's Avatar
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    Talking The Joys of Stockpiling

    Relax... stockpiling can seem overwhelming, after a while it just becomes second nature.

    Samples are your friend! These things I would have no problem buying on clearance. What do I care that the roll of tp got dented? It does the job I look for b1g1 sales. You know there are non-food things you will always use...
    toilet paper
    shampoo
    conditioner
    tooth brushes
    tooth paste
    deodorant
    feminine hygiene
    razors
    laundry detergent
    cat litter, etc

    As far as food stockpiling goes... what are your eating habits? Are you big on ethnic foods... or is ketchup too spicy for you? Do you have it in you to can things yourself or would buying prepared better for you?

    Most importantly... do you have a back-up plan for your perishables if you lose power? I live in a condo, so a generator is out of the question. We lost about 5 months of frozen goods when the fridge died. We had enough shelf-foods to get us through until we could buy another one.

    You may have a lot of shelf-space... but consider it prime real estate. Stock ONLY what you WILL use. It is not the time to experiment. If you have never eaten pickled pigs feet, don't add it just because it was a shilling If you know you like pasta... buy pasta... you aren't saving anything if you don't eat it.

    Never pay full price for anything unless you HAVE to. Your stockpile will take time. Add when you can, what you can.

    I have my stockpile here, there and everywhere. Small living space = creative storage. I do have an inventory of what is hidden in each spot.

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    Registered User vigilant20's Avatar
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    One thing I did was to find recipes that used dry and canned goods exclusively and printed those out. So if I ever needed to live out of my pantry for a time it would be no problem! I'm buying a home myself on monday, so this may come in handy while my budget settles down from this big upheaval!

  12. #11
    Registered User Bournecrazy's Avatar
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    well not so much ASDA but tesco's (got 1.5kg of chips for 40p!!!) as its nearer but they all seem to have the same things for around the same price. its just easier to get too. that rent is quite good for London. (rent around here is about £500-700) good luck with the move and enjoy your new home

  13. #12
    Registered User Contrary Housewife's Avatar
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    I started by buying extra of items that were on sale at a good price, that I knew would keep, that I also knew we would eat. It's no good buying things that don't freeze well or will get stale in a month or two. I don't buy food we won't eat, at any price, and I don't generally stock up on junk food.

    Same with toiletries and cleaning supplies. I find most things clean up very well with soap and water and a little scrubbing so I don't invest in a lot of fancy products just because they are on sale.

    Don't feel that you have to buy your stockpile all at once. Just keep an eye out for a bargain, and when you can afford it, buy extra items.

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