What advantage does this hold for you and other questions?
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  1. #1
    Registered User KimZ's Avatar
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    Default What advantage does this hold for you and other questions?

    What advantage is it to stock pile?
    Do you need a large amount of your budget to get started?
    Can you stockpile everything?
    Do you use coupons?
    Do you only stockpile certain things?
    Is there a basic list or spreadsheet on what to stockpile and what not to stockpile?
    How many hours do you spend planning, mapping and creating to do this?
    I know I will have more questions as this thread is answered but this is just to get my brain wrapped around this.

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    I personally don't stockpile. When I was a single mom, I tried doing this and I think it gave me my shopping fix but it didn't really save me money. The things that have coupons will always have coupons - toothpaste, mouthwash, shampoo etc.

    We eat a very simple diet and no processed foods. I would just eat simply and buy what's on sale.

    I buy about 20 pounds of chicken breasts, veggies, fruits and beans every week. Pretty cheap and healthy. I do buy a significant amount of fish when it goes on sale...so maybe that's a stockpile.

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    Registered User Brat's Avatar
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    If I remember right I spent some time when I first started out with what we liked to eat and how much it took for a meal.. At this time all the kids was home so was cooking for more than I am now.. We only liked certain things and we also had a garden to that helped in cost.. If I used 3 packs of corn in a week then I put it down.. I usually had 2 meals a day so what ever meat I used for that I keep a list for a while to see what I was buying and how many meals I could get from each.. We seemed to eat a lot of the same things at that time.. once I knew what I used I started my stock pile from that.. 3 pack of corn a week x 52 is 156. I am a list person.. LOL.. I knew how many meals I could get out of a ham, Turkey chicken pork roast or what ever.. As things come on sale I would buy extra for a month. I bought my grocery's once a month then.. If a family pack of meat was on sale this week and I needed one this week I would buy 2 to have another time.. I keep an inventory as to what I had on hand and it wasn't long before I had a 6 month supply.. once I got there I would put it on my grocery list when I opened the next to the last thing.. When it was on sale I would buy enough for a couple of months.. I found that things went on sale every 6 weeks or so and when I first started I would get just enough to last that link of time.. Make sure you use old first.. My buying was only sale items.. even flour sugar and things. It took a while to get the stock pile built up a little at a time but once it was there it was easy to keep up with. The main thing is buy what you like.. If you want to try something new just get enough to see if your family likes it and then you can decide if you want to put it in your stock pile.. Mine changes as the weather changes.. I make a lot of soup in winter..Having 4 kids took a lot of food..lol.. What was left after the meal I put in the freezer.. Label was what it was how much was in the package and date put in.. Example Chili.. a couple cups could be used for Chili dogs later..

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    Registered User Raiquee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KimZ View Post
    What advantage is it to stock pile?
    Do you need a large amount of your budget to get started?
    Can you stockpile everything?
    Do you use coupons?
    Do you only stockpile certain things?
    Is there a basic list or spreadsheet on what to stockpile and what not to stockpile?
    How many hours do you spend planning, mapping and creating to do this?
    I know I will have more questions as this thread is answered but this is just to get my brain wrapped around this.
    1) what advantage is there to stockpiling? Well, this changes for each person involved. For me: It saves us money. And I'm not a couponer. I buy meat when it's a great price. I buy it in bulk to also get good prices. I buy dry goods when they are at good prices. Sales generally happen on a few times a year basis. I don't want to run out of tuna and pay $1.49 a can, when I could have gotten it for .79 a can. Also my husbands work slows down in winter, so it acts as a safety net for us if he doesn't get a fill week of work or worse, none at all.

    2) do you need a large amount to start stockpiling? No, you can just add on a few extras each week you to grocery. Say you need a bottle of ketchup and it's on sale. Instead of just getting one, get 2-3. Do this for things you eat frequently.

    3) do you stockpile everything? No, we stockpile what we eat. I mainly stockpile meats, dry goods such as flour, sugars, other baking stuff, Mac n cheese, tuna, etc. I do stockpile canned veggies/frozen veggies but they come from my garden. Soups, sauces, jams, jellies, broth, veggies, fruits all get home canned.

    4) no, because I usually buy store brand. I am going to start being more careful and looking up coupons on things I do buy name brand (coffeemate creamer is my weakness!)

    5) do you stockpile certain things? I think this goes with question 3. I do stockpile Hba and meats are my big one just because when they are on good sale you can save yourself a butt load of money!

    6) a spreadsheet available? There is, as well as a week to week what you can purchase to build a stockpile. It's prepper oriented, so if that appeals to you a quick google search will bring them up. I made my own list of things I know we eat on a regular basis.

    7) how many hours spent? Well once a month I do freezer inventory so imn OT wasting what I stockpile. I do this before I meal plan so I can use up any forgotten things quickly. It takes me about an hour for 3 freezers. Otherwise I don't thing it takes me any additional time, probably because I don't coupon.

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    Registered User Raiquee's Avatar
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    Sorry about all the typos. My iPad likes to autocorrect things depending on what it thinks my sentence should be.

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    What advantage is it to stock pile?
    It helped me to keep the grocery bill down while feeding three teen boys. Also, it is nice to not run out of things.

    Do you need a large amount of your budget to get started?
    Nope. Like others have said, when something is on sale, buy more than one. Keep doing that and you will have a stockpile of items that you use after a while.

    Can you stockpile everything?
    No. Only certain things have a shelf life. Whole wheat flour goes bad on the shelf, but crappy all-purpose flour is fine on the shelf for a long period of time. You have to freeze whole wheat flour if you want to keep it a long time. You have to do your research on things to see what the storage needs are.

    Do you use coupons?
    I don't really because most of the things I buy aren't on coupons. If you use items that are on the coupons, then go right ahead. Though, lately, Fred Meyers (the local version of Krogers) has been having store coupons for things that I buy.

    Do you only stockpile certain things?
    I only try to stockpile what the family eats. But, there are a few things that I buy just whenever at whatever the price because we only use one bottle a year and it isn't worth stockpiling that item.

    Is there a basic list or spreadsheet on what to stockpile and what not to stockpile?
    I am sure there is one somewhere on the internet. This list would change for each family according to their likes/dislikes and eating style. We cook very basic meals (meat, starch, veggie, bread item) because my guys cook (refuse to unleash males out into the world who do not know how to cook and clean). And, the list changes as the family dynamics change. We are currently eating down the pantry because my guys finally stopped eating massive amounts. I no longer need 5000 of something to keep ahead of their tummies.

    How many hours do you spend planning, mapping and creating to do this?
    That depends on how organized you like things and how you want it organized. I know of people who don't do inventories, but have everything grouped and alphabetized. They can walk into their pantry and, at a glance, see what they need. Me, I am not that organized. I have a (supposed to be a running list that is very outdated) list from the last inventory. I tend to do inventories once a year (in the fall). I then do a meal plan using up the old and weird stuff first. Actually, I have two lists, one for the pantry and one for meat. The meat one stays pretty up-to-date. I tend to add things to it from the store receipts and from what was put in the freezer after dinner (like ham meals from a leftover ham).

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    What advantage is it to stock pile? No last minute runs to the grocery store. Fewer trips to the grocery store. I'm single, got laid off and only needed to buy fresh fruits and veggies from the store, I don't drink milk. I was so thankful for my stockpile. Your in Florida - maybe hurricane season? I was in Idaho and could have gotten snowed in. Cost savings if you stock up on sale items.

    Do you need a large amount of your budget to get started? Nope. Buy a few things every trip - as things are on sale or you have extra money. Plus I grew as much as I could and canned or dehydrated it. If you can garden it will help keep the cost down. I canned hm tomato soup everything except the flour sugar and salt came from my garden. i had $0.005 cost in each pint jar.

    Can you stockpile everything? I did food, seasonings, bathroom supplies....anything that you will use before it goes bad.

    Do you use coupons? No, I don't.

    Do you only stockpile certain things? I'll stockpile anything that I use on a regular basis.

    Is there a basic list or spreadsheet on what to stockpile and what not to stockpile? yep, others answered this

    How many hours do you spend planning, mapping and creating to do this? A few minutes, just like regular grocery shopping. There were 2 stores and I would look their sale ads on line make a list and go. I had a walk in pantry and could easily see what I was low on. The real time spent was if I used Zaycon to buy 40# of chicken or 40# of hamburger or found some other great deal on fresh meat or produce (garden). Then I'd have to can, dehydrate or freeze it to preserve it. But when the weather is terrible outside, or you don't want to cook and all you have to do is walk into the pantry (freezer) for a jar of home made _____ and not have to do any cooking (just warm it up) it is worth all the work!
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    Registered User Raiquee's Avatar
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    Stockpiling seems to be in separate categories. One is extreme couponers, couponers. The other is preppers. I would say I fall into the prepper category, although I'm not building a bunker in the backyard. And I'm not worried about the end of the world. I am worried about an economic collapse and since we went through one without food, I'm not doing that again. So I'm prepping for that I suppose.

    Your grocery budget is the one "expense" besides electric/gas that you can really bend. If I stock up now while money is fine, then when my husband misses a few weeks of work I don't have to bat an eye. We eliminate the grocery budget to pay other bills and don't starve because we have a stockpile! I want to get intense on a bill I'm almost done paying on? Skip the grocery for a week or two and put that money to that bill! You can do that if you have some food in your pantry.

  10. #9
    Registered User Ayanka's Avatar
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    What advantage is it to stock pile?
    For me the advantage to stock pile is that I don't have to get to the store when it is opened to get all of my ingredients.Sometimes I miss one and I have to go, but I generally manage to avoid the stores on Saturday. I work in shifts, so I can go to stores when there aren't too many people around.

    Do you need a large amount of your budget to get started?
    No, you don't. Because I use up my stockpile as I buy it, I have a fairly low grocery budget actually. I don't have a separate stockpiling budget.

    Can you stockpile everything?

    If it is a perishable and I can't freeze it personally I can't buy it. In this case that is anything with a shelf life of less than 3 months I don't have plans for when I want to buy it, is not getting in the cart. However I am not the most organized person, to say the least, so this might not be the case for you. I do stockpile HBA, because that is the one thing I want specific brands.

    Do you use coupons? No, but coupons are pretty rare inhere.
    Do you only stockpile certain things?
    I only stockpile things with a long shelf life, that I know I will actually eat. Or at least I try to, sometimes I screw up and I have to toss something, but that is to be avoided at all cost.

    Is there a basic list or spreadsheet on what to stockpile and what not to stockpile?

    What I typically stockpile: pasta, premake boxes where you have to add ingredients, tomato sauce, canned veggies that I like, tortilla wraps in the pantry. For the freezer this would be things like meat on sale and veggies on sale.


    How many hours do you spend planning, mapping and creating to do this?

    About half an hour a week when I actually have time and there are interesting sales. Generally less.

    For me the biggest advantage of maybe not stockpiling but the freezer is that I have a lot of premade one portion ready made food in it. If I have to work a lot or don't feel like cooking I can just grab some food from it and heat it in the microwave. I cringe to think what my food bill would be without that.

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    We have lived off our stockpile whenever my DH lost his job. It was a real eye opener to see where it was lacking and where we did fine on it. It, for me, is a safety net like money in the bank. ( store what you use, use what you store, rotate, rotate, rotate)

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    Dh is out of work for 3 months and just found jobs. I keep enough that I dont worry.
    We didnt qualify for food stamps or assistance because Michigan is asset based.
    We have a paid for house and cars so we would have to go to a church.
    Also DH got a small taxed severance-so we couldnt even apply for unemployment until after 60 days. Then we find a snafu that has him listed wrongly. So after 3 months thats not settled.
    Better to be independent.
    We stockpile everything we can,use coupons when I can,definately use the store card to save. We run everything through the CC to earn points which we use to stockpile.
    I just buy several sale items based on a years projection tempered by expiration dates (which I seldom follow anyway).

    I live in a winter climate and walking in the other room beats going out in a blizzard any time. I can be tired and grab ing. w/o shopping.
    I dont use any spread sheet. I rarely run out of anything.
    Inventory control is important,rotation crucial. Every year 2x a year I donate to the food pantry if I over estimated. Tax write off/critical need. win win. Don't really spend hours planning and mapping. I do base it on the 45 or so basic meals I make. I plan for the week,shop at home visually and get what else I may need (stray item) and anything on super clearance or great sale. I have been doing this in varying degree for 30 years. When teens lived here-hard. Now lighter.

    Do you have a dark dry area to stockpile. I shouldn't get too hot. And seal most things in tubs to avoid bugs.
    I guess I am a prepper in that I dont want to do w/o in times of job loss or illness. Not really worried about the zombie apocalypse.

  13. #12
    Registered User khaski's Avatar
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    What advantage is it to stock pile?

    Time, money, the ability to be generous, sanity saved. by stockpiling items commonly used in my household, I almost never need to dash out to purchase something we've run out of, so that saves time there. Money, because by stocking up when prices are at their lowest, you spend less over all (and save gas on those last-minute trips for something). The ability to be generous, because whenever a food drive of some sort or another comes up, or I now of someone in need, I can pick some things out of my stockpile and donate them without a second thought or a hit to my wallet that week. Sanity saved- less running around (again).
    Do you need a large amount of your budget to get started?

    No, you begin however you can afford to begin, be it an extra $50 to hit the week's canned goods sales hard or an extra $2 to buy 2 extra jars of pasta sauce on sale that week. Don't feel pressured to go from nothing to everything. It takes time, and you don't want to overdue it while figuring out what works for your budget and household.

    Can you stockpile everything?


    Yes and no. Starting off, stick with canned, dry (pasta, cereal, etc) and freezable items for ease. You can stockpile perishables like fruits and veggies if you get into canning and dehydrating. I would suggest beginning with 'easier' items that require no prep to begin, then branch out to canning or dehydrating down the line if it interests you.

    Do you use coupons?


    I sure do! But I've given up on the newspaper game- too much hassle. I sometimes use coupon clipping services where you order the specific coupons you'd like. Most often, though, I just print ones available online. The best thing you could do to begin would be to find a blog that covers the grocery stores in your area and takes the sales flyer each week then lists the sale items and matches them up with the available coupons. Many will be printables. You just point, click, print, cut and save at the store. No, I don't extreme coupon. I save probably, on average, $10-20 a week couponing this way. But that's an easy $40-$80+ that stays in my wallet, all for hitting the blogs and printing out some coupons.

    Do you only stockpile certain things?

    Generally, only what we use regularly. I stockpile mostly canned and dried goods and will fill my freezer 'til it's stuffed if there are good markdowns on meats when I hit the store. I do can my own jam sometimes, though not enough to escape buying some as well. I dehydrate fruits and veggies sometimes. I especially stockpile health and beauty products like shampoos, toothpaste and feminine products. Not because I feel we NEED 25 tubes of toothpaste at a time, but because I will take advantage of a good deal when I see one to avoid paying full price. iheartcvs.com is a great site to figure out the drugstore 'game' and begin stockpiling that sort of stuff for bottom dollar.

    Is there a basic list or spreadsheet on what to stockpile and what not to stockpile?


    Not that I am aware of, nor would you really want to follow it. Each household has its own list of things and will and will not use. You sort of have to come up with your won through trial and error.c Carefully consider how much of something you'll actually use before it expires. 47 bottles of ketchup on sale for .23 a piece is a great deal unless you end up throwing out 42 of them because they expired.

    How many hours do you spend planning, mapping and creating to do this?

    I shop 1-2 grocery stores a week, the drugstore in fits and starts. I spend probably 45min- 1.5 hours a week reviewing the sales and coupons match ups for the grocery stores and deciding how to divvy up my budget between the 2, if I'm hitting both. That would be more on the 1 hr+ side. If a quick peak at store #2's sales circular for the week shows me it's not worth the trip that week, more like 30 mins to plan the list/coupons for the one store.

    It's well worth couponing and maintaining even a small stockpile, IMO. Our household is 2 adults, 2 elementary aged children, and my budget is $120 a week for food. This includes toilet paper but not pet supplies. Beauty products sometimes fall in this, sometimes not, simply depending on where I buy them based on the best deals. I've maintained that budget roughly 6 months now and our pantry and bellies are full, and we eat a wide variety of foods, including meat, dairy, some junk food, lots of fruits and veggies. I am able to keep to that budget in New England, where prices are pretty high.

    That's another important part of meal budgeting and stock piling- know your local prices. Don't assume one store is cheaper than the other. Compare circulars, walk the aisles. What is a 'great deal' sale price at one store can still be more than another's regular price on the same item. Knowing what the basics you frequently purchase cost at your preferred store can help you figure out if things are a bargain elsewhere.

  14. #13
    Registered User MsMarieH's Avatar
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    I have a relatively small stockpile. Some things I have more of (like a case or two). Most things I have an extra 2-5 items of, depending on how quickly we use things up and how long things last and how good the sale was.

    What advantage is it to stock pile?
    I am able to take advantage of sale prices.
    I don't run out of things at inopportune times.
    I am prepared if there were an emergency, such as a power outage or blizzard with extra supplies.
    If one of my friends or family were in need of food, I would be able to help them.
    Food is a security blanket issue for me. Mentally I can pretty much live without a WHOLE LOT of things, as long as I know where my next meal is coming from. LOL

    Do you need a large amount of your budget to get started?
    I chose to do a fairly large stockup initially, but I think even if you just set aside $10-20 a week to stock up on the great sale items of things you use often, that's a big help.

    Can you stockpile everything?
    Some things have expiration dates that would discourage stocking up.
    Space limitations are another consideration (i.e. if you live in an apartment).
    Some things you just don't use up all that often and they would go bad before you did use them (like oil going rancid).

    Do you use coupons?
    I personally don't really use coupons much at all. But that's just me. I'm not good about clipping them, I get tired of organizing them, and I don't feel like doing the tracking necessary to really utilize them well. Plus I don't really buy all THAT many things where the coupons give me bang for buck.

    Do you only stockpile certain things?
    I have a spreadsheet I created for my stockpiling. I'm not great about keeping it updated, but it gives me a list to look at when I want to do a bigger stockup once or twice a year.

    Is there a basic list or spreadsheet on what to stockpile and what not to stockpile?
    I found my initial spreadsheet online. Lots of prepper sites have them. I just had to finetune it for my situation (like I don't drink coffee for example).

    How many hours do you spend planning, mapping and creating to do this?
    I spent some time up front planning it and organizing my shelves, but on an ongoing basis, I spend very little time on it. I place an order (often at Sam's club, but sometimes I just incorporate it into my weekly grocery shopping) once or twice a year, as mentioned.

    When I was just starting out, I wrote out a list of the top 20 things I wanted to start with. Your list of course will vary, but I found this very helpful to get me started. It's based on things I would use regularly.

    ) Flour
    2) Sugar
    3) Brown Rice
    4) Milk (powdered, evaporated, sweetened condensed)
    5) Oatmeal (Old fashioned)
    6) Beans (dry or canned - white/black/dark & light red kidney)
    7) Tomatoes (diced, paste, sauce)
    8) Bullion (chicken, beef)
    9) Peanut Butter
    10) Jam
    11) Pasta (spaghetti, lasagna noodles, penne, macaroni)
    12) Spaghetti Sauce
    13) Mayonnaise
    14) Canned fish: tuna, salmon, kippered herring, sardines
    15) Canned meat: ham/chicken/roast beef/spam
    16) Cornmeal
    17) Vegetables, canned: mushrooms, carrots, corn, peas, green beans
    19) Fruit, canned: applesauce, peaches, pears, fruit cocktail
    20) Canned soup: cream of mushroom, tomato, chicken noodle, vegetable beef

    I would put a similar type of list together and then watch for sale items each week off this list. If you see a 10/$10 type sale, that's the week to stock up on that item. Set aside a certain amount each week for this purpose. Decide what the amount is you want to stock - a one month amount, 3 months, 6 months, a year? It's up to you and what will work for your family and your space. I like having a 3--6 month supply of most of my staples. Some of my staples probably have more like a year supply, others just a month. There are definitely factors that go into the decision. Sometimes I buy a bunch thinking I would use more of it than I do. I try not to do that too often, as that's money tied up in food I could have used elsewhere. However, if there were a disaster, you can't eat currency.

    Make sure you store your food somewhere safe - where it won't be impacted by light, heat, humidity, rodents, etc.

    My husband was out of work for 14 months during our recent Great Recession and let me tell you, I was soooo thankful for the food pantry I had built up. It made a tremendous difference to our financial stability. it doesn't have to be an "end of the world" event for it to be devastating to your personal world.

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