If it's this bad now, what will winter bring? - Page 2
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 26 of 26
  1. #16
    Registered User banana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,475
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    16

    Default

    I read about this also and it is very very sad. I know our rates go up each year. I'm dreading the 30% increase that they say in coming withing a couple of years.

  2. #17
    Registered User Sonnenwende's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Left Coast
    Posts
    271
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    13

    Default

    Makes me glad to live in an apartment right now. Less area to heat and cool. Less to power.

    I wonder if it will be worth it to ever buy a house with the cost of energy going up so much? I know I am doing what I can by using less and buying renewable energy credits to stimulate the green power market, but other than that? Bad situation.

  3. #18

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    734
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    Reduce heating costs by these money saving tips

    Do an energy audit of your house, identifying areas where heated air is leaking out. Check around doors, windows, fireplaces, and other areas that may feel drafty. Use caulk, weather stripping, door sweeps, plastic, and other appropriate means to close off these leaks. If your house is poorly insulated, adding additional insulation will pay for itself in reduced heating costs.

    Minimize your use of ventilation fans such as bathroom fans and kitchen hood fans in winter. A bathroom fan can suck all the heated air out of the average house in little more than an hour. Over the course of the winter, ventilation fans can increase your heating costs by a surprising amount.

    Don't heat areas of your house you don't use regularly, such as guest rooms. Close heating vents or turn back thermostats in those areas and close the doors for a painless reduction in heating costs.

    Turn down the heat and use space heaters to heat the room you spend time in.

    Keep your furnace, heat pump, or other heating equipment in top operating condition. Dirty filters reduce the efficiency of your furnace or heat pump. Poorly tuned units are inefficient and use more fuel. An annual maintenance agreement is well worth the money to ensure that your equipment is properly maintained and will last as long as possible.

    Don't turn your thermostat up above the desired temperature. It won't heat up any more quickly and will make your furnace work harder. Also, while it makes sense to turn the heat back when you're sleeping or not at home, turning it down too low can actually cost you more because the contents of the house have to be re-heated in addition to the air. 68 to 70 degrees while you're home and awake, and 60 to 65% while you're asleep or not at home are reasonable temperatures.

    Consider a programmable thermostat to raise and lower the temperature at pre-set times.

    Check the temperature setting on your hot water heater. If you have a dishwasher, your water should be heated to 120%. Otherwise, it can be somewhat lower.

    If your water heater is in an unheated space like an unfinished basement, wrap it in an insulation blanket available at hardware stores to prevent heat loss.

    Wash clothes in cold water whenever possible.

    It's tempting to stand under a hot shower on a cold morning for as long as possible, but cutting your shower time in half can save up to 33% on your hot water heating costs.

    In winter, open the blinds and curtains on the sunny side of the house (the south-facing side) when the sun is shining and close them as soon as the sun goes down to retain the solar heat. Close curtains on the shady side of the house (north-facing side). If you don't have curtains, consider installing some. Curtains made from heavy fabric with lots of folds (fullness) can prevent cold air from seeping in and warm air from seeping out, which reduces your heating costs

  4. Remove Advertisements
    FrugalVillage.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #19
    Registered User Wendy99's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,069
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    16

    Default

    great tips!! our house is tiny , but needs some new windows. our new patio door this year should help a bit, but we need 3 other new windows in a bad way, but that won't be happening this year .... everyone wants our money ugh!! heating gas, car gas, groceries etc etc .... i signed us up for the equal billing for our gas for this year - will see how it goes

  6. #20
    Registered User angrypuppy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    67
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    14

    Default

    Scary if you heat with oil/gas. I wish all the best. We primarily heat with wood. Is a wood stove an option for anybody? Last winter we did not turn the heaters on at all. Burned about 4 cords of wood.

  7. #21

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    203
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    I'm scared to death to see our gas bill in the coming winter months! Right now, the only gas we are using is our hot water heater. Our latest gas bill is $97! We freaked out. It has gradually been going up the last few months, but man this was drastic. We called the gas company and they came out to check for leaks. We do not have a gas leak it is just due to the rise in price!

    The winter months are going to be just awful!

  8. #22
    Registered User suzysaver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    oregon
    Age
    52
    Posts
    1,317
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    16

    Default

    I bought some thermal curtains last year to cover two large windows in the living room and I also bought 4 more panels and inclosed the staircase...so the heat isn't lost upstairs. These have been great in helping cool this summer also. We live in an apartment which has baseboards and a heat pump....we only use the heat pump or a/c when needed and we make it a bit of a challenge. We set a digital therometer on the coffee table and when it gets hot ..we say o.k. lets see who breaks first, we have only turned on a/c once this year when it reached 101. We also do this in the winter, a must for this challenge....long johns, wools socks, a snuggle suit and a nice warm fuzzy blanket and don't forget to ask the cat to join you.
    Great topic, gets us all thinking ahead and what we need to prepare for.

  9. #23
    Registered User MomToTwoBoys's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Edmonton, AB Canada
    Age
    43
    Posts
    3,972
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Blog Entries
    23
    Rep Power
    30

    Default

    I'd say it's time to invest in thermal curtains or some really heavy blankets for alot of people. I think that it should be recommended that landlords have their houses inspected when a new tenant moves in and the landlord needs to present proof of inspection when that tenant signs an agreement to live there. It'll let them know what has been fixed, what will need to be fixed (on the part of the landlord) and what the tenants will be responsible for doing to ensure that their utilities are as low as possible.

    I can't imagine what some people would be paying if they lived up here where it gets to be -45C sometimes. We're doing our part this winter in putting up vapor barrier inside the sliding glass door in our living room, a weatherstrip barrier on the bottom of our front door and some new caulking (and maybe a vapor barrier) on the window next to that door. Those are the three largest cold air allowances in our home and since we already put up new windows, plus closed up alot of other drafts, our home should be tolerable to where we can keep the heat at 68. Our gas bill gets really high here so we do all we can to make sure it stays low.

  10. #24
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    England
    Age
    60
    Posts
    78
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    14

    Default

    Please can i just point out that those with gas heating you must have adequate ventilation to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning

  11. #25
    Registered User HandyMom's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,241
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    21

    Default

    I bought electric heated blankets for the beds and one for the sofa if we are lounging there and get cold. That was the cheapest way I could figure out to keep warm on the coldest nights.

  12. #26

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    203
    Post Thanks / WTG / Hug
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    We are fixing to go buy electric blankets! That is normally when we are the coldest is at nighttime so I think this should really help us out on our gas usage!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. No please just bring yourself
    By StartingOver in forum Thanksgiving
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 11-13-2011, 05:43 PM
  2. What should I bring?
    By Rhiamon in forum General Chat
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 10-18-2011, 02:18 PM
  3. Bring or Buy?
    By AmyBoz in forum WOTHM
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 07-26-2010, 05:00 PM
  4. How do I bring it up??
    By Mojjo in forum Question and Answer
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 07-14-2006, 01:50 PM
  5. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-19-2005, 08:45 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •