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Discussion Starter #1
I have this huge quilt that I had made about 12 years ago for our queen size bed & have been using it for a bedspread. Due to so much use, I have had to re-patch the beast a number of times (with sturdy,non-dry rotted material). I have had to re-patch at least 1 doz squares each year. I had thought of buying a new bedspread, but the ones that I have seen are ugly(uglier than my quilt),and are expensive($50-70)....& if I were to purchase one, I would probably have to purchase another in a few years b/c of wear...equalling to $100-140 later on)
So I resolved to re-patching again to save money, working a few squares a day (nearly done).Does this make any sense, or am I just wasting my time?
 

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I don't know.

If you have to not pay a bill to get a new one, it's worth repairing the old one. If you have to buy on credit, then it's not worth it.

Now, what is your time involved? If it takes you 2 hours, then you're earning $25/hour, well worth the effort. If it's going to take you 50 hours, then it's $1/hour. If it's very involved and you spend 100hours on it, you're making .50/hr. so you need to decide what is your time worth to you. Frugal is not only money but time wise. In TWG, Amy does the time evaluation. If it's going to take lots of time away from your family, to only stretch the life a few months, it might not be worth it.

I have no idea what your quilt looks like. If it is a family heirloom, then I'd save it, and fix it as I have timeand store it to pass on, but no rush on it. If it's just to last for a bit, I'd like just go without until I can get a new one.
 

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Sorry, but I just have to ask -- exactly what are you doing on that bedspread that requires so much work and you have to replace it every few years?! :p Sorry, but it just seems so strange -- I've had the same comforters for years, and only ever change them because of my tastes. I can't imagine having to patch them because or wear!
 

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exactly what are you doing on that bedspread that requires so much work and you have to replace it every few years?!
:hubba: Well, her name -is- ManyHouseApes... you HAVE to ask??? :lol:

Anyways, if the quilt is something sentimental, I would repair it until every stitch was done over... I am a sentimental/heirloomy person... if it is just something you bought, but, used because it was there... Get something you like
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Lady V,you are toooo funny!lol. The truth be told, I am a little attached to the quilt...its big & I don't have to fight dh over it....& heavier than anything that I could buy in the store. It does get washed alot and I hang it out to dry on the line(weather permitting)
 

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just a thought... since you ARE attached to it... I vote to keep repairing it. Some things are irreplaceable.. can your kids sew?

I know when I was in college I was part of a project. Every major designed and sewed a quilt panel and then all the majors were sewed together to make one HUGE 'blanket of education'.

Would your kids be willing to do something like that?

(Will they do it for a Klondike bar :lol: )
 

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Well if you are replacing the original squares then you can expect each new
square to have a life of 12 +years. So even though you are giving up your time, you are more than doubling the life of the quilt.

I think it is worth the time investment for something that is important to you and something that your "house apes" will remember for years to come. It may be something they fight over in long and distant future.
 

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I look at it a couple of different ways. First of all you made it. Many people quilt for the hobby, maybe you are one of those people, but I personally think that if you took the time to make it and put so much effort into it, then I vote to keep it and repair it.
2nd of all, you don't have to buy a new one when you repair the old one. The days are now long gone when that was considered the normal work of the day. Women didn't have TV or radios to entertain themselves and spent their evenings gathered around the table doing sewing repairs while kids did other things. If you don't mind doing the repair I see no reason to get rid of it. Of course I don't really like to quilt that much and ended up tying the ones I have made.
My grandmother used to make tied quilts out of used material and often didn't have to buy much to help it along. Some of those old quilts she made were like sleeping bags they were so heavy. I found out she just made a new cover to tie on when it wore out. LOL My grandmother was a frugal woman. Those quilts were some of the ugliest, yet warm quilts I have ever used. I wouldn't have traded them for anything in the world.
 
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