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I've had good luck growing potatoes in large pots. I also put several hills in an old washer tub.

You can see by the rock in this picture why plowing up the ground and having a conventional garden is not an option where we live. Since standing bent over to tend a garden is not something we're interested in doing anymore, we've opted to raise most of our gardening to a more comfortable height, which is why I knocked together a small stand from scrap lumber for the washer tub to sit on.

We're doing SFG in a tabletop garden. The downside is it dries out quickly. We've only used it one season without much luck but it was neglected. This year will be better! We made an identical table garden for my mom two years ago. She is handicapped and conventional gardening isn't an option for her. She has had great luck with hers and grows all kinds of small crops like lettuce, greens, radishes, etc. It's easy for her to tend and it keeps out destructive critters like bunnies. We made both gardens with an old panel door on the bottom and scrap lumber for everything else. The squares are marked off using some lawn edging I got cheap at a rummage sale and cut to fit. It's hard to see with all the wild raspberries behind it, but the garden is full of various peppers and brussels sprouts.
 

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Brenda, I'm going to make some cinder block raised beds, too. I read in the SFG books you only need six inches of soil for plants that are not root crops. I think cinder blocks are nine inches. I'm only doing one row in order to cut the cost of the soil.

I've also put empty plastic cartons in the bottom of beds and extra large planters that were too deep, in order to save money on the soil.

Just some thoughts. :)
 

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Usually I'm not a jealous person. I love where I live. But I'm jealous of living in a national park! Or several. How cool is that? We love the national parks! Where were you before Grand Canyon?

I'll have to look into the SFG soil at Lowes. Thanks for the tip!
 

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I had the new book from the library and own the old one. I checked out the new one to see if it was enough different to be worth buying, but it wasn't.

No digging means you don't dig out your current dirt to backfill it with new, better dirt, you just make raised beds and put the good dirt inside that. I figured that out years ago so that was a no-brainer for me.

The only thing I got out of the new book was a recipe for "Mel's Mix" for the soil, which I copied into my older edition. I decided it wasn't worth buying a new book. YMMV.
 

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I'm sure, Pam. Just sayin'.

The new book struck me as a rehash of the old one, but with the author trying to give the impression there was value added. I didn't find that to be true, but others may. :)
 

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I wish we could use the dirt here, but it's very poor soil and VERY rocky. Including boulders the size of cars and bigger. Glaciers, dontcha know. Tilling that stuff up is an impossibility. So we have to buy our dirt. We're such bad gardeners, we've found it pays off to buy the expensive fancy dirt with the fertilizer already in it, plus the mulch, compost, etc. already mixed in the proper quantities. We've mixed our own many times in the past and it's never worked, even with the advice of master gardeners. I envy those with better gardening skills than we have, and who have natural materials to work with, like we had in southern Minnesota farm country where I grew up.
 

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Yeah, there's a lot of good info in the SFG book, either one of them.

Have you tried self-watering planters, Pam? They require a lot less tending. Of course that doesn't work if you have a huge garden. We were gone most of last summer and our tomato plants in the self-waterers didn't even notice.

Nobody in our area got anything from their gardens either, which was strange because we had a hot (high 80's, low 90's) summer so tomatoes should have loved it. Everyone had the same as we did, huge beautiful tomato plants and no fruit. Weird.

We can't have a conventional garden here so we're taking a many-pronged approach and trying different things.
 
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