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We don't have our generator set up yet, but could drag it out and power our freezers and fridges if we had to. It would handle our entire house if the wiring was done, but as it is now, we would have to connect freezers and fridges with extension cords instead. We went with a dual fuel genset, that will run on gas or propane. We heat with propane and already have a 500 gallon tank with a keep-full arrangement in winter, so would, we hope, never have to deal with storing and rotating cans of gas.

Last time we had a significant outage, long enough we started to lose food, we had only our side by side and smallish chest freezer. I spent over $100 on dry ice which did virtually nothing to save our food. The freezer was just too big in comparison to the amount of dry ice I could get. It was very hard to find even in a town loaded with outfitters. We lost about $400 worth of food, even though we got power back before all of it thawed and were able to salvage most of it. We now have a fridge, side by side, and 2 freezers, so the loss would be much greater these days. We paid about $1,000 for our big honkin' genset, which we consider cheap insurance. If we lost the entire contents of our cold food storage, it would cost more than that to replace since the big freezer we've bought since that outage is filled mostly with meats and seafood.

You don't need a hurricane to lose power. We're in the middle of the continent, so hurricane prep isn't something we ever need to think about. But our generator provides peace of mind for other weather emergencies.
 

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I really don't like canned vegetables either except for canned tomatoes.

I find that we generally did okay this past year and a half for food. Part of it is being flexible. Our first choice food was not always available, but we always had something we could eat.

I see the news is making a big thing of how much bacon has gone up. I just keep thinking, I don't need to buy bacon. There are lots of other foods I could choose from.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
M, I've had too many bags of vegs get freezer burnt. They just don't seem to store well, and when you add in freeze cycles and the random power outages which seem to happen more often these days, it starts to add up. Canned food doesn't mind if the power goes out.

I've been thinking about thanksgiving, too. Checked to see how much pineapple I have. While I was there I counted the canned tuna and jars of peanut butter. DH has been eating a lot more PB since he is home all day now.

Kathy, yeah, canned isn't our first choice, but good in a pinch, and needed in certain recipes. Like creamed corn for cornbread, and canned pumpkin for certain desserts.

Red, I don't notice the metal taste, but some brands are definitely better quality than others.

Bacon is up to $6-7 per pound here, which seems odd, given that other parts of the pig are cheaper than nearly anything else in the meat case. And this is pig country, so there's no shortage locally.
 

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sadly ch is it me not using it up lol I know we could do canned veggies but just didn't grow up on it ..they have everything in the stores. they must sell. bacon has been going up for years here but bacon...lol but only buy a few lbs a year of better quality that you can use the bacon fat not scheiders etc
 

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Beef started a sharp rise here about 3 yrs ago. There have been some short term price spikes but shopping sales gets it back to the new pre-covid levels and prices seem to drop again when supplies get back to normal. Chicken breast has gone up a lot. Sale prices used to be $1.19 to $1.69. Now I'm happy to find it at $2. Regular price is $4 now. Pork is still the best deal per pound, excluding stuff like bacon. Bacon went way up about 3 yrs ago, too. Fortunately a little goes a long way.

We stock canned corn and tomatoes, with lesser amounts of green beans and peas. Rarely buy creamed corn since Husby's heart attack. We keep frozen peas and mixed veggies on hand. Used to keep Brussels sprouts but of the 22 pkgs of Aldi's we bought to get through last winter, 18 had worm holes in them so I'm leery now.

Ground turkey chubs were $1.70/lb Monday. Not bad.

Odd that canned stuff would have a metallic taste when the cans are lined with plastic.

We have one more stock up planned in November. It won't be much, aside from about 800 lbs of field corn and a couple hundred of sunflower seeds. Our freezers are packed and pantry is close to full. I'm not planning on forcing our poor dogs to eat kibble again, so will still need to pick up more ground turkey. We bought 60 lbs of rice for them @ .25/lb recently, enough for a yr. We have plenty of toilet paper and, really, everything. We're very lucky and we know it.
 

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Our freezers are dwindling now. I don't have a plan yet. I don't think I have enough of anything for 6 months....I have some paper products, a bit of canned items, some frozen meats right now...Stores have ground turkey for $4/lb and I saw some 8 lb turkeys for $2/lb. That was all.

I may pick up some canned/boxed items, paper items and not any frozen. I bought a generator last winter, just in case.

I just saw this article: "Work has been stopped at all of Kellogg’s cereal plants in the U.S. after roughly 1,400 workers went on strike. The union and company have been at an impasse for more than a year over pay and benefits. "

DS2 eats cereal every day. He loves Kelloggs....
 

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Well, if cereal is too pricey, I'll strongly suggest alternatives. Toast, eggs, oatmeal and waffles come to mind....
I bought a pack of TP and got chubs of ground beef on sale- $4/lb. Those went in the freezer. I also purchased water that was on sale
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Fortunately Kellogg's isn't the only brand that makes sugar flakes and rice puffs. I'm with you Rujerro, rather have eggs or oatmeal myself.
 

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I eat toast almost every day, homemade bread is super inexpensive. You could make batches of waffles or pancakes and freeze them for convenience.
Stores now have signs requesting people limit their purchases of paper products. There are quite a few canned vegs I am accustomed to keeping and eating. I have 1 metal shelving unit dedicated to canned goods and paper, another cabinet to the boxed/dry goods. My freezer space is very limited but I'm walking distance to several stores. So I wouldn't lose much frozen food from a power outage. All power lines are buried locally but there are occasional transformer problems.
I'm buying turkey, chicken, sausage or hamburger when it's on sale, limited to freezer space. My preference now is to have ready-to-eat frozen (usually leftover soup, chili, lasagne, etc.) rather than raw meats.
 

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really didn't know they were on strike! but lots of cereal here ..no real shortages here and plenty of shopping. but it does truely depend where you live and what you are comfortable with..I only have a few weeks. but yes meat going up and up.
 

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I just saw this article on prices for food and how much it's risen. Here is a portion of the article:

"The cereal price measure was up 27.3 percent over the year last month, and 2 percent from August.
Dairy and sugar prices also rose in September by an over-the-year 15.2 percent and 53.5 percent, respectively, while the meat price index was up 26.3 percent above its year-earlier level.
While much of the inflation story has been focused on surging energy costs and products affected by the semiconductor chip shortage such as used cars, rising food cost signals are increasingly flashing red.
As the U.S. economy rebounds, packaged food companies are grappling with inflation, with Conagra Brands Inc. saying on Oct. 7 that it would increase prices again on its frozen meals and snacks.
Conagra said it was facing rising costs of ingredients including edible oils, proteins, and grains, forcing it to increase prices on frozen goods by 3.5 percent and on staple meals by 3.3 percent.
Food-makers General Mills, Campbell Soup, and J.M. Smucker also have raised wholesale prices in response to rising ingredient and freight costs.
Pork and beef prices have surged in the past few months, while the Labor Department’s August inflation report showed that meat, poultry, fish, and eggs were up 8 percent over the past year and 15.7 percent from prices in August 2019, before the pandemic. Beef prices jumped 12.2 percent over the past year, and bacon was up 17 percent during the same period."

The pricing seems rather accurate, although I haven't checked everything at the market. spaghetti sauce has jumped 30% and cereal has jumped 25% or so in my area.
 

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Our food prices have also risen in the last few weeks, but not as much as yours.
Nevertheless, I am stocking up on winter supplies. I cook a lot myself in glasses. Preserving is no longer very modern in Germany either, but I still do it. Meat can be boiled down very well in glasses.
 

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I will have to keep an eye out because mostly stock up on sales and they are mostly regular cycles plus depends where you shop. Some things just have gone up during covid and didn't come down like butter. Just signed up for winter csa for the next 2 months.
 

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Some stuff I need to replenish in my stockpile -- our "sick kit" items (canned soups and instant "noodle cups", gelatin, applesauce, Gatorade, ginger ale, NyQuil, facial tissues, nasal saline spray, cough drops, Mucinex, ibuprofen and acetaminophen), some shelf stable proteins (I have a few 3 lb mylar pouches of shredded beef, some cans of tuna, and jars of nut butter, but I'm out of things like canned chicken and freeze-dried eggs), and easy meal options for low energy times (frozen meatballs, frozen ravioli or tortellini, etc.).

The easy meal options might be something that I make and freeze, or something that I purchase premade. I try to give myself a little bit of grace about having things like frozen stuffed pastas and frozen pizzas on hand sometimes and try not to rely on them. Some nights, having a couple of frozen pizzas and a bagged salad for dinner means that I can get a bit more rest or get some more loads of laundry finished or a bathroom scrubbed -- and it's still far cheaper than ordering takeout!
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
@spiderdust I keep some freezer meals on hand, too. My age and health means there are times I cannot physically get dinner on the table. Everyone needs a little help sometimes. When large bags of potatoes go on sale I bake and stuff them, and freeze for later. I make chili and seasoned taco filling to pull out and microwave. If here's a good buy on chicken I bread and freeze fillets, or smoke thighs. When I can't cook, DH can get things out and reheat them. We keep frozen ravioli, ramen noodles, canned soup, peanut butter, tuna, etc, too. It's good to have a few shelf stable items around.
 

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I went to the grocery store in person the other day and I was shocked at the price of hamburger....I paid $5 for the cheapest hamburger in a roll....I used it yesterday and it wasn't as bad as I thought....very little fat...even tho it was like 80/20 I think.....
This week Krogers has bacon on sale for $4.99 and you can buy up to five. So I will be buying 5 and putting freezer....I do not need it, believe me but I like to keep it on hand. Walgreens had tuna and salmon on sale again this past week....4 small cans for $5....
My husband loves canned potatoes....so every time I go to Aldi's I pick up four cans....I always keep soup on hand and we like french style green beans in a can.....and beets....don't eat much corn but always have a couple cans in cabinet. We do like frozen better but it has to be Birdseye brand. Husband doesn't like any other brand....he also like canned peaches and I keep a few cans of that....applesauce in the little cups....tomatoes, rotel, and that is about it for canned goods....
I am going follow your example CH and next time I buy potatoes I am going bake and stuff and freeze....haven't done that in years....usually I throw away half the bag....
 

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Stuff I like having in the freezer for easy/quick meals: cooked meatballs (cook pasta, add sauce), frozen meatloaf (uncooked - you can thaw first or just bake longer if frozen), leftover soups (keep crackers and croutons in pantry), lasagne, burrito filling, BBQ.
Those little applesauce cups are great for baking. So many recipes call for 1/2 C or 1 C, don't need a whole jar.
I have frozen uncooked bread dough because less space than a baked loaf. I have also frozen homemade unbaked biscuits, should try that again. Easy to supplement your supper if the oven is already on for a casserole or something. I pre-make my own brownie and cornbread "mix in a jar" using pint jars. Just add milk/egg/oil, very cheap. I also have a "snack cake" mix that works well and is pretty versatile. I have even made these in the microwave on occasions when it was too hot for the oven.
 
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