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Discussion Starter #1
I have a secret garden on the field at the back of our yard.
I plant potatoes, cabbage etc. on the patch, some roses are still planted there, well, I do not take the soil conditions into consideration, just plant everything I like, and what surprised my most is that the majority of them would survive, but I still don't know how, perhaps the magical nature helps a lot!
I guess I should learn more related things to plant them with scientific methods, well, guys, is there any practical advice for me to have a good start on learning some theoretical method?
 

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1. figure out what kind of soil you have, is it sandy, loamy, clay, etc. Identify this and then look to see what you need to amend it with. Most soils can use organic compost -- compost made from leaves, grass, kitchen waste, etc. I don't know if you can buy that in China. Manure is good too, if it is composted (aged and dried) and not fresh.

2. Find out what grows well in your area. What are other farmers planting? Do you have any kind of agricultural agencies that help small farmers?

3. Look up plants that you want to grow and see what they require. Do you have those conditions in your area? Is it warm enough in the spring? Too hot in the summer? Long enough growing season? Wet enough?
 
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Basic info about gardening is that vegetables are huge nitrogen feeders. Compost provides very little nitrogen but it adds tilth to the soil so moisture is held in the soil better. Manure provides nitrogen to the soil, but fresh manure can burn your plants by giving too much nitrogen. Composted manure dug into the soil will provide nitrogen and is preferred over fresh.

I use a composted, dried chicken manure in my vegetable garden as it is higher in nitrogen than most of the other manures. Fish emulsion is a good side dressing for supplemental feedings during the growing season.

As another posted mentioned, ask someone local for their advise. They would have a better feel as to what is available and what grows well in what season.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
1. figure out what kind of soil you have, is it sandy, loamy, clay, etc. Identify this and then look to see what you need to amend it with. Most soils can use organic compost -- compost made from leaves, grass, kitchen waste, etc. I don't know if you can buy that in China. Manure is good too, if it is composted (aged and dried) and not fresh.

2. Find out what grows well in your area. What are other farmers planting? Do you have any kind of agricultural agencies that help small farmers?

3. Look up plants that you want to grow and see what they require. Do you have those conditions in your area? Is it warm enough in the spring? Too hot in the summer? Long enough growing season? Wet enough?
Thanks Contrary Housewife, get the greatest response! (Well, just get the function to know where to find the records of my posts ever posted by clicking "My Profile") My aunt is farmer and I invited her to help me managing the garden, learn a lot from the respects you mentioned above. I learned a lot about soil, water, heat, light, temperature, seed, nourishment, manure(I use natural farm manure created in the traditional farming method), I do not plant my plants randomly right now, the garden grows prosperous in the warm spring you see. :) Thanks for your advice, I'd keep learning on that. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6

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Basic info about gardening is that vegetables are huge nitrogen feeders. Compost provides very little nitrogen but it adds tilth to the soil so moisture is held in the soil better. Manure provides nitrogen to the soil, but fresh manure can burn your plants by giving too much nitrogen. Composted manure dug into the soil will provide nitrogen and is preferred over fresh.

I use a composted, dried chicken manure in my vegetable garden as it is higher in nitrogen than most of the other manures. Fish emulsion is a good side dressing for supplemental feedings during the growing season.

As another posted mentioned, ask someone local for their advise. They would have a better feel as to what is available and what grows well in what season.
Thanks Birdie, Yours really give me much valuable advice, I am pretty confused on the usage of fresh manure when my aunt tell me to not use them immediately when they are produced, I got the easy to understand explanation, thanks, really learn a lot!!! :flowers:
 

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Happy gardening everyone. I can't wait to get my seedlings planted in the ground, but need to wait until mid April when the soil is warm enough.
 

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Happy gardening everyone. I can't wait to get my seedlings planted in the ground, but need to wait until mid April when the soil is warm enough.
:clap: happy gardening too to everyone whoe loves garden!! Can't wait to have more seeds planted in the ground as well!! :) Strawberry planted in greenhouse is mature in our area right now, tomorrow my family would have a tour to pick strawberry together to enjoy the sun, the short but wonderful spring and beauty of nature in the garden in village. :) Guess it would be of much fun. :) Mention this case in wish that all of you would have a great time the incoming warm weather. :)
 
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