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Discussion Starter #1
I have just started trying to teach myself to paint...well I will keep it up..I am not doing so well right now. Does anyone have any tips that will help me select the right type of brushes? Anyone have an suggestions on books I might be able to get?
All your help is very much appreciated.
 

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Master Dollar Stretcher aka AmyBob
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Former art major here with a minor in watercolor. Of course, I haven't done much painting since I graduated college, but I miss it!

For brushes, it totally depends on what kind of painting you're doing. Watercolor? Oil? Acrylics? Each has different types of brushes available.

The same with paints. If you're learning to watercolor, don't use the dried cakes, get some in tubes. They're more expensive, but much better quality.

I will tell you not to buy the cheapest brushes, and stay away from anything designed for elementary children. In art school I tried to get by with some cheap school-quality brushes, and when I finally bought "good" brushes, I was amazed at the difference.
 

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I have many gourds that I have grown and am waiting to learn to paint. Why am I waiting????????????? I have books, tapes, paints, brushes even websites that have online painting classes in my favorites. I guess I just need to put everything aside and go for it!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I painted my first picture yesterday!!! Yeah! I think it turned out pretty good, well for my first time. It was an angel holding a star. I think I am gonna try and do some wood burning around my picture and then paint it next time. Will help in the outlining..don't you think?
thanks for the tip AmyMcgs.
Sundae, just jump right in..I did!
I got a tip from a friend yesterday about brushes, might help some else. He said that if you take the brush in your hand and rub the bristles back and forth on your hand and you see one or more bristles come out..bad choice of brush. Hey who would have known...haha!
 

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I have never taken art in post secondary school but am self taught and have had couple of commisions. This would be my advice paint what you like, and paint what you feel. And paint on everything! Cardboard, paper, stone etc I think it gives you a good idea of texture and how certian paints work. Still life teaches you about shadow, texture etc. So set it up on your table and go nuts. I agree about the brushes. Don't buy cheap brushes. And no matter how much you don't like something you have painted or drawn I would say keep it. It will show you how far you have come and teach you a diffrent way to do something. I would also say paint for yourself but don't be afraid to show it to people. Sometimes it may not look as bad as you think it does. Artists are their own worst critics!
 

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I've been teaching myself to paint for the last year or so.When I dont know what kind of brushes or paper to use, I just look at the dickblick catelog, and usually order the student version of whatever type of medium I'm using.
 

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I paint in acrylics and have found that I enjoy using techniques from oil as well as water colors with them. I usually buy my paints at a local art store when there is a sale. Canvases can be bought at Wal Mart for a good price. Brushes are the one thing I'm choosy about and you can get deals on those as well. Just watch for sales at the art stores like Michale's. But sometimes I look at other things beside brushes as painting tools too. For instance a large feather can make interesting designs.

For palates I have discovered and love to use candy packages like the Ferrer Rochet chocolates come in. The fancy ones come with plastic box that has a lid which can help keep your paint moist.

If you are working on something and want to stop but have paint on your palate just spritz it with a bit of water and then cover tightly with saran wrap. this will keep the paint moist and usable for a couple of days.

For painting things so that the background is painted first but without destroying the sketch of your subject in the foreground try using wax paper. Trace over your sketch and cut out the shape. Then use contact cement to glue it down. Once your background is dry lift the mask and use a rubber eraser to remove any remaining glue.

Her is an example of a painting I did in acrylics using this technique.
 

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I've always been an avid drawer (heheh) using pencil, pen & ink, charcoal, and conte, but never really got a hold of painting. It's been that way since I was a kid. I've found that the only thing that works for me is just going with the flow- I can't decide ahead of time what my paintings are going to look like! I haven't done many, but the only advice I can give is to go with what you feel like. Good art is hard to force.
 
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