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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2 December 2010 Bread without kneading. 2 December 2010 Bread without kneading

Usually bread is made by kneading the dough, which takes a bit of effort, so people tend to buy commercial bread. The method shown makes a nice tasting bread, quickly and effortlessly.

Procedure: Three cups of flower, with a table spoon of quick yeast and about two cups of water. Mix together, and let rise in a pot for about four hours. Place in an oiled oven cooking pot and let rise again for about two hours. Cook at 450 F for 30 minutes with lid on, then another 20 minute with lid off. let cool before cutting, and enjoy.

Modification possible are: Add a teaspoon of sugar, add teaspoon of salt if desired, add a cup of whole wheat flower, add a tablespoon of some gluten.
 

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Wow this looks nice, easy & fool proof. :)

Is this a dense type of bread? Also, with your modification of adding whole wheat flour...is that in lieu of one of the cups of white OR are you adding it to make the total flour used = 4cups? And lastly - will a Corningware glass pot work for the oven vs cast iron/enamel cookware?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wow this looks nice, easy & fool proof. :)

Is this a dense type of bread? Also, with your modification of adding whole wheat flour...is that in lieu of one of the cups of white OR are you adding it to make the total flour used = 4cups? And lastly - will a Corningware glass pot work for the oven vs cast iron/enamel cookware?
The bread is not really dense. It is a bit chewy, and is hard not to eat too much, since it is so good. Adding a little extra gluten makes it more chewy.

Adding whole wheat flower just makes the finished product a bit heavier, and probably more nutritional. Too much and the mess wont rise quite as much, but doesn't affect quality too much. It sort of depends upon your own view. Quantity of mixture is not a all critical. Just add more water to make doughy.

I imagine corning ware would work just fine. I assume you are referring to the square containers. The cast iron one shown in my photos is used often for baking potatoes, and most things cooked in the oven. I bought it at Cosco a few years ago. The heat tends to be relatively even throughout.
 

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That looks really good. I never read where bread could be cooked (even partially) in a lidded pot but that crust looks wonderful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That looks really good. I never read where bread could be cooked (even partially) in a lidded pot but that crust looks wonderful.
Pioneers in the old days has to use a cast iron pot above the fireplace, since they usually did not have an oven.

All the heavy pot becomes is an oven with fairly even distribution of heat. As you can see looking at the cooked loaf, there are no burned hot spots.
 

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I'm going to do this!
 

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Pioneers in the old days has to use a cast iron pot above the fireplace, since they usually did not have an oven.

All the heavy pot becomes is an oven with fairly even distribution of heat. As you can see looking at the cooked loaf, there are no burned hot spots.
Cast Iron rocks. Just had to say it. ;) Your tutorial has me wanting to bake some, thanks.
 

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mmmm, looks easy and yum too. You know what also might be nice?? In the browning portion of the steps, brush the top with butter, sprinkle on some garlic salt (like Lowreys Garlic salt) then topping with a cheese that'll brown nice too, like a cheddar, motzarella, or even a parmesean (just not the powdered stuff in a can).
 
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