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I had a little free time on the weekend, so I built myself a new alcohol stove, one of the pepsi can stoves. It was very very easy and didn't take long, under 1/2 hour. I followed the instructions here: Penny Stove 2.0 - Standard Tecate Cans

I just used a few different objects laying around to rest the utility knife on for the various heights, and spun the can around on the table while applying only a little bit of pressure. Then I used an old steak knife to rough-cut the can, and tearing it down to the score line made a nice edge.

And then of course I had to try it out:



I used some methanol gas line anti-freeze. 3 capfuls inside, put the penny on, and then another capful and a half on the top in the priming pan. The times listed on the website were pretty accurate. 2 cups of cold water were boiling around 4 minutes after lighting it, and it burned for around 20 minutes (18 I believe).





This replaces an older, unpressurized pop can stove I had made previously. This one seems to work much much better. It's super-lightweight, no moving parts, throws a lot of heat. Just a really nice little stove to throw in the backpack for hiking/camping.
 

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That's a nice little stove, and could be used as a survival stove as well.
Have you ever built a rocket stove? They can be made out of a tin coffee can, and are not near as compact. But when camping in one spot, they are really nice to cook on because all you need are sticks for fuel.
 

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That is really neat. Great pics.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That's a nice little stove, and could be used as a survival stove as well.
Have you ever built a rocket stove? They can be made out of a tin coffee can, and are not near as compact. But when camping in one spot, they are really nice to cook on because all you need are sticks for fuel.
I've looked at those rocket stoves, yes. I am thinking of building a more-compact, wood gasifer stove (top lit down draft, or possibly top lit up draft), for the same reason, but to make it a little more packable. Just load with small sticks and light. There is definitely no shortage of kindling around here, the small branches at the base of a spruce or pine tree would be perfect. Even if it's a little bigger and heavier, the fact that I wouldn't have to carry fuel would make up for it.
 

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With a coffee can, couldn't you use a pine cone as a starter for the kindling? Asking because I would truly like to know.
 
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