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I'm wondering if anyone has done this before. I can't use my oven to bake fresh breads for supper now that it's so hot outside. I'm wondering if I can bake at night and warm in the microwave later. I imagine so, but don't know exactly how to go about it. Does the bread have to be completely cool before I put it in the fridge or freezer? Should I store it in the fridge or freezer, or just on the counter or in the breadbox? What if I want to bake a weeks worth? I feel really silly asking, but we are having withdrawls and my brain if functioning on minimum right now. Thanks!
 

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In the summer I bake bread in the morning, but then I get up at 4-430am so that may not work for you. I then leave it covered on the counter or on top of the stove all day. If there's any left for the next day, I put it in a ziploc bag.

And yes, bread should be completely cooled before putting it in the refrigerator or freezer, but I've rarely ever done that. Every time I've ever tried it seems to be a little soggy after it's been thawed and my crew gets cranky when I give them soggy bread.
 

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I wouldn't bake it in the oven overnight while you're asleep. If it burns on the elements in the oven, and catches fire, your whole family could be in danger. You can freeze bread dough and then just chuck it into the oven on rainy days and bake it then. Or, you can put the dough into a crockpot and bake it. Use a big coffee can and put it in the crockpot. The loaf will come out round and kind of bubbly on one end (the open end) but it's really yummy and a real conversation piece. :)
 

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If you are a night owl, then night is ok, if you are up. Leave it when it's done to cool on a rack with a tea towel over it so it doesn't get too dried out on the surface.

when you get up, wrap it and freeze it.

When you want hot fresh bread, thaw it, slice the loaf (all at once so that the crumbs are cleaned up in one fell swoop) and nuke the slices.

10 seconds on high will give you nice hot fresh tasting bread.

And if it's buns, try 10 to 15 seconds.

If you have a microwave proof rack, the bottoms wont get steamy soggy in the microwave, if you don't just use a paper towel (which also contains the crumbs and keeps the micro cleaner)

If you are an early bird, then try using a refridgerator dough (just a touch more sugar to feed the yeast) and punch down and grease and cover with plastic in a bowl in the fridge.

When you get up, form the loaves, let them raise a bit, then bake.

After baking, throw the oven open to cool and when I do this I open my windows and doors to get a good cross draft, often using a fan.

We live in a very hot dry zone where the nights aren't even that cool, but the coolest point is around sunrise.
 

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oh and if you wrap it in a paper towel or a clean tea towel, you can freeze it wrapped like that in a plastic bag. This helps avoid the soggy bits from thawing in plastic.

I don't bother.

Here is what I do to avoid soggy corners from frozen bread thawing in the bag.

I take it out of the freezer all frozen and shake the frost out of the bag leaving the bread in, just opening the bag and sort of banging the bread a bit to loosen and toss any frost crystals out into the sink.

Then I thaw the loaf on the counter. It stops that soggy corners problem.
 
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