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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found a #10 can of powdered milk in my closet. Before I received it someone bought it for preparing for the year 2000 and whatever computer melt down that was supposed to happen. Anyway, do you think it is still good. Probably no nutritional value.

What do you think. Should I just get rid of it?
 

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Does it have an expiration date?
If not I would get rid of it.
 

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Mmmmmm...if it was purchased for the Y2K thing, that means it's at least 10 years old, :skept: I would get rid of it...I -think- the "prepared pantry" recommends 8 - 10 years in optimal conditions. IMO, times up on it and time to discard.
 

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I just read an article on shelf life food studies (Journal of Civil Defense) that ..well you've got to read it to believe it...it actually references 100-year-old canned goods. Apparently the FDA wrote the original artical. Here's the website. The whole notion of it totally blew me away.

Shelf Life of Canned and Dry Foods by Robert Wayne Atkins, P.E. - Grandpappy

"Five Different Shelf Life Studies:Two on Canned Food and Three on Dry Food" is the name of this article. It also refrences a Brigham Young University study and has the following info:

Over 30 years for wheat and white rice.
30 years for pinto beans, macaroni, rolled oats, and potato flakes.
20 years for powdered milk.

I found this stuff quite amazing. You need to read it to believe it. Let us know what you decided to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I do remember hearing stories about canned food being found in places like alaska and that the food inside was still good. I just figured it was because of the cold.

Well, I think I will get rid of it. My closet has zero temperature control and I really do not like how the milk mixes with water.

Maybe I should just save it and go on antiques road show in about 50 years talking about how people stored food in cans like this for y2k. I wonder if it would be worth anything?
 

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I would probably try it and see if it mixed up okay. If it didn't seem "off" (as in toxic, because powdered milk will *never* taste like fresh milk) I would definitely use it for cooking and baking. I wouldn't use it for things when you count it for the nutritional value (ie, I had x-number glasses of milk today so I'm doing okay for calcium intake) but I find I use milk in a lot of things where I'm not counting it for the nutrition (ie, when I use dairy in a cream soup, I don't often take that into consideration when thinking of how much calcium I'm getting).

If it tastes okay, maybe using some in a homemade hot chocolate mix??
 
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