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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I really would like to try these to help cut electricity costs.

I talked to two people who used them, and they had totally
different views of them.

One person loved them, and the other said they hated them,
that they didn't provide enough light, and not to use them
anywhere where you actually needed to really see.

Maybe the difference is the brands?

I still would like to try them. I want to use them as ceiling
fan lights and in the kitchen. What wattage would you
recommend for these areas?

I seem to spend alot of money on lightbulbs, and hear these
last a very long time.

Thanks!

****Is CFL the right name for the bulbs? I am talking about
the little spiral bulbs....
 

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I bought a bunch of these for the same reason. However, I have had two burn out in a short period of time. There goes a chunk of moola! We don't have a lot of lights on at one time, so I don't go through a lot of bulbs. The only place in my house that uses a lot is in the bathroom. That's two or three a year. I think I'll be sticking to regular bulbs.
 

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We use them here in the house except the one end table in the livingroom where I need alot of bright light for knitting and crocheting after it gets dark. Otherwise I really like them, they seem to last a long time for me although I have heard other people having the same problems as Crazyhomemaker.

Just buy one or two and try them and see if you like them. I think that way would be the best. Use them where you use the ceiling light/fan light/lamp the most. :)
 
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We have these in every fixture in the house, even in the shop and barns. I find that if you use the "day light" cfl bulbs they give off much more white light, the regular bulbs give off a more muted yellow tone.

I've had a few to burn out as well. They made an odd sound and then put out a very nasty smell. Maybe it was a mercury smell??
 

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I would like to know what to use in dimmer lights and those fixtures that are enclosed with a globe? The package of these says not to use in thes applications..Also everytime the electric goes off and it is on it burns out and the electric goes off here pretty regular.
 

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I only use these bulbs, and I've never had a problem with them. I use the equivilant to a 60 W bulb. Mine last a really long time, and some of them I've had in the same lamps for 3 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for your feedback!

I bought some last night, and they are providing plenty
of light.

Brat, I looked at my package, and while it does say not for
use with dimmer lights, it doesn't say anything about globes.

I have a glass cover on my kitchen ceiling that covers three
bulbs. I wanted to get more for that area.

So, are the rest of you using these lights in ceiling fixtures
with a globe?
 

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The only place in my house that uses a lot is in the bathroom. That's two or three a year. I think I'll be sticking to regular bulbs.
I found out the hard way that they are NOT rec. for the bathroom...too much moisture.

They shouldn't be used any place that has a lot of moisture. I have them everywhere in my house......including a fan light, EXCEPT in the bathroom. (burnt out two of them learning this lesson) They take a little longer to get to the brightest light but I use the equiv. of 100 watt bulb in the lights that I want good lighting....IE: my craft area, and reading lamp in bedroom. Once you get used to them, I really like them! I even removed the cover on a fan light fixture in my computer room so I could put one in the fan light.....looks ugly but who cares??? saves money

Recently heard this 'rule of thumb' for turning them off and on....if you are going to be back in the room in 15 minutes don't turn them off (turning them on and off is hard on them too) but if it will be longer then turn them off. With regular light bulbs the time is 5 minutes for returning to the room.

I have always been careful about turning lights off but think it has still saved money.
 

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I have these also we moved 4 years ago and bought 4 of the bulbs with us have had those for a year prior and they still going strong so they are 5 years old. I agree with one poster they are not so great in a bath room .
 
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I found out the hard way that they are NOT rec. for the bathroom...too much moisture.

They shouldn't be used any place that has a lot of moisture. I have them everywhere in my house......including a fan light, EXCEPT in the bathroom. (burnt out two of them learning this lesson) They take a little longer to get to the brightest light but I use the equiv. of 100 watt bulb in the lights that I want good lighting....IE: my craft area, and reading lamp in bedroom. Once you get used to them, I really like them! I even removed the cover on a fan light fixture in my computer room so I could put one in the fan light.....looks ugly but who cares??? saves money

Recently heard this 'rule of thumb' for turning them off and on....if you are going to be back in the room in 15 minutes don't turn them off (turning them on and off is hard on them too) but if it will be longer then turn them off. With regular light bulbs the time is 5 minutes for returning to the room.

I have always been careful about turning lights off but think it has still saved money.
You are absolutely right about the turning on and off. I took a bulb back to home depot and told them it did not last the amount of time the package said. They told me every time you turn the light off and on it shortens the life of the bulb. I think it would be a good idea to not use that kind of bulb where you will be turning it on and off alot because of the cost of the bulbs. I don't know if you are finding this but Aco (a hardware store here) has been selling them in large pkgs for very reasonable amount of money. $1-$2 a bulb. I do have my bulbs in ceiling fixtures everywhere in my house. I have recessed lights in my bathroom so I don't have them there. (sounds like it is a bad idea anyway)
 

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Thanks for your feedback!

I bought some last night, and they are providing plenty
of light.

Brat, I looked at my package, and while it does say not for
use with dimmer lights, it doesn't say anything about globes.

I have a glass cover on my kitchen ceiling that covers three
bulbs. I wanted to get more for that area.

So, are the rest of you using these lights in ceiling fixtures
with a globe?
I have ceiling lights that have places for 2 bulbs and we only put 1 in it.
 

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We've used CFL since they were first available in the 1990's. The price for them has gone down drastically, but they still aren't perfect for each light application.

We've also started using LED lights (we found several styles at Sam's Club), which use even LESS electricity than CFL (about 7% what a CFL uses). In our master bathroom we use a combination of CFL and LED lights, because neither is "perfect". I can only hope LED technology will put an end to CFL in the near future.

LED lights are a better choice for lighting where a CFL (which contain mercury) could easily break (lamp), or in a child's room. We've replaced all our recessed ceiling lights with LED lights.

As already mentioned, CFL will NOT last as long if they are in a place where you turn the light/s on and off for only a brief period of time. To save the CFL in our bathrooms from buring out prematurely because of those brief "visits", we've placed large motion-activated nightlights that cast enough light to "get the job done" and see to wash your hands (no windows in our bathrooms). They stay on for 90-seconds. The same thing in our laundry room where we come in and out of the garage. We wore out our florscent ceiling light after 3 years turning it on and off as we went through the room, and had to replace it because you can't replace the balast anymore.... The new nightlight will take care of that abuse.

CFL take several minutes to shine brightly in a cold temperature. In the winter we keep our home very cold, so it would take several minutes before you could actually see yourself in the bathroom mirror. We now have 2 CFL and 4 LED lights over our mirror, and one LED recessed ceiling light. So now we get instant light from the LED lights and brighter light from the CFL when it finally come on fully.
 

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Ours have lasted a year, not a really good comparison but better than some stories I've heard.

They do take a minute or two to "warm up" and get to full light. MY wife has vision problems and she is fine with them 99% of the time. With that said, we have other lights in the ceiling fan overhead in the living room for sewing and reading at night.
 

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~I've had CFL's in my bathroom for over 2 years with no problems. What problems are you encountering?
I started switching over to CFL's 3 years ago. I use them in globes, in lamps(which have been dropped a lot and still haven't broken. They're much sturdier than traditional bulbs!), the bathroom vanity lights, over the stove and the porch light.
Our power goes out every other month and I've never burned out a bulb because of this. None of our CFL's have burned out at all yet.
Most of the CFL's in our house were purchased at Home Depot. They sell a 5 or 6 pack pretty cheap.~
 
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