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My family has been eating crockpot oatmeal for about a month now--I use a ratio of 2 1/2 cups water to 1 cup of old-fashioned oats. I think using less water eliminates some of the soupiness. If it's too thick, you can stir in some milk. I use dried apples and cranberries for my fruit.
Someone earlier mentioned baked oatmeal--does anyone have a recipe for that?
 

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OK, mine is in the crockpot - it was easy enough, in fact, hubby just said "you done already?"

I used 6 "scant" cups of water, steel cut oats, a couple big handfuls of raisins, and a handful of dried cranberries

I'll give my report in the morning
 

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OK, mine is in the crockpot - it was easy enough, in fact, hubby just said "you done already?"

I used 6 "scant" cups of water, steel cut oats, a couple big handfuls of raisins, and a handful of dried cranberries

I'll give my report in the morning
Well, bummer.

I SOOO wanted to come on here and say how great it was, but.........


it was burned on the edges and bottom, hard, and dry

BUT, ever the frugal lady that I am, I took of the salvagable part on the top in the middle, add some milk, and .....that was.......well, yummy!!!!

SO, I'm thinking I'll have to try this again with more water (I used less per hwmabire3 posting that hers came out soupy) and maybe a bit less oats.
The raisins and cranberries were the best part, and probably soaked up a bunch of the water too.

So, my first try was not great...but I'm gonna try it again, it was good enough to try it again, for sure!!
 

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Anyone else make this, and with what proportions? Also, crockpot on high or low? I'm hoping to make it tonight, provided I get some feedback. :)
 

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I like oatmeal in cookies.

Not regular oatmeal though. But this recipe in very interesting. I think I will half it, and try it early in the morning, so I can watch it. I don't feel safe leaving it on all night.

I am going to try it on low heat with some apples I have in the freezer. And some raisins too :)
 

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Would anyone have any ideas on how to halve this recipe? I guess I could freeze some, but I'd rather just cook less. Otherwise, it sounds wonderful!

I've found the steel-cut oats either with the regular oatmeal or with the organic/natural breakfast stuff. The steel cut means that the oats absorb more water (I think), and you have to cook them a teensy bit longer, but they get super creamy.
 

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More frugal oatmeal cooking methods:

Instead of 9-hours of electricity use...

Steel-Cut Oats

Bring 4 cups water to boil in a pot with a tight fitting lid. Turn off heat and add one cup steel-cut oats (I also add 1-T. whey/kefir/yogurt). Cover the pot and leave sit overnight at room temperature. The next morning cook the oatmeal on low for 9-12 minutes. Stir occasionally. If you want fewer servings, use the same ration of water to oats, just reduce the amouts.

Overnight Thermos Oatmeal

http://www.ehow.com/how_2275972_cook-thermos-save-energy-money.html

Directions For One Serving:

Fill your thermos with boiling water, seal with cap, leave for 5 minutes. This will get your thermos heated while you prepare the oatmeal.
On the stove top, bring one cup of water to a boil with 1/4 cup steel cut oats.
Pour out the water inside the thermos, then pour in the contents of the pot (boiling water and oats).
An alternative way to make this is once the thermos has been heated for a few minutes, empty the water, toss the oats in the thermos then cover with water that’s been brought to a rolling boil (same amounts of oats/water as above).
Seal the thermos and leave it overnight.

[Note: I like to lay the Thermos on it's side, rather than the normal up-right. I think foods "cook" more evenly when they are distributed in the Thermos on it's side.]
 

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Are rolled oats the same as old fashioned oats? And not quick cooking?
Here's your oat information...

Oat Groats -the whole oat grain.

Steel-Cut Oats (aka Scottish or Irish Oatmeal and Pin Oats) - the least-processed form of oatmeal. The only thing done to the oats is to slice them lengthwise with sharp steel blades so they'll cook in about 40-minutes. Porridge made with steel-cut oats is thick, chewy and filling.

Rolled "old-fashioned" Oats - are oat groats that have been softened slightly by steaming, then flattened between steel rollers. They cook in a fraction of time required for steel-cut oats -- a little more than 5-minutes.

Rolled "quick-cooking" oats - are oat groats that are steamed and cut into three or four slices before being flattened by rollers. This reduces the cooking time to little more than 1-minute.

"Instant" oatmeal - is rolled very thin, precooked, then dehydrated. The oats are rehydrated "instantly" by adding boiling water.
 
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