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Discussion Starter #1
while the standard in quality nonstick skillets may be cast iron, it seems that the qualities that make them desirable should incarnate to other cookware as well. dutch ovens being such an example produce great results when used in an oven or over a fire, but what about other stovetop cookware?

cast iron pots are widely available on ebay and even griswold makes quite a few; the question is, why are cast iron pots less popular than pans?.. is it that they were only produced in small quantities, or do people just not use them as much anymore?

as far as kettles go, i have seen a lot of cast iron ones at antique stores, but wondered if they were practical to use on a stove. a ci kettle that's not too large should heat water on a stove just as fast as a steel one, but do they need to be seasoned on the inside to keep rust out of your water? not sure exactly how that would work, anyone have any experience with these?
 

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The reason I do not use them for everyday is they are too heavy. And when full of something boiling hot - dangerous for me to try and - for example - carry to the sink to drain.

I use my dutch oven IN the oven for chili and roasts.
 

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Same here. Cast iron dutch oven, but if I am going to boil water, I don't want to mess with the weight. If I am making tea, I usually just nuke the water. :)
 

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I do have a couple of small ones that I use everyday but mostly I uses my skillets even as sauce pans for vegetables and things.I have several skillets from 4 inch to 18 inch so have more of them than pans...I also have 5 dutch ovens that I use one size or the other almost every day..

I know that they are kind of heavy but with the smaller ones it isn't so bad..
 

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Discussion Starter #5
i guess the weight could be an issue for many people but i still think it would make for some fun cooking.

ok so you can call me stupid but i managed to burn some pea soup using stainless steel, of course i blame it on the pot.

i'm not taking about anything too big, its just that all i ever see for sale are skillets and griddles. i just really need something deeper.

these look pretty enticing, but like i said they are hard to find for sale..


with stuff like soup, there's really no need to lift your pot, you just ladle it, and by the time you're ready for seconds (or thirds) it would still be nice and hot :lip:
 

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Chicken fryers, like the Lodge you have pictured on the right, are deep. I use mine often for soups, chili, and stew, or hotdishes, or dishes backed in the oven, even breads.

I regularly use a vintage chicken fryer, cast iron stovetop DO, and a Lodge Combo Cooker for home use. For camp use, I use a variety of camp DOs. The chicken fryers have helper handles so they can be a two-handed affair to help with the weight issue.

I don't like cast iron saucepans. The most damage I've found to seasoning is steam and boiling water, and mostly I use saucepans to boil stuff. I don't see any advantage to using cast iron for that. I had the opportunity to buy a set of four CI saucepans once (with lids) for fifty cents each, and as much as I love CI, I left them there.

My saucepans are hard anodized aluminum and I wouldn't trade them for cast iron. I like that they are lightweight to handle. I don't recall ever scorching anything in them, and I also like that they can easily be hung for convenience.
 

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My mother cooked a great chicken dish in a Dutch oven. I'll have to ask Dad if the recipe was written down or just in her head. She browned chicken pieces added cooking Sherry and wild rice. What else like water I have no clue.

I like the extra handle of the pan pictured, it would be a big help with heavier lifting.

piney
 
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