Frugal Village Forums banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
346 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Some of my work clothes are dry clean only and had I not been so excited over the crazy sale I got them on I would have looked at the washing instructions and probably not bought them. I try to avoid the chemicals of dry cleaning and though there are eco friendly ones they are even more expensive. Realistically I could probably afford the eco friendly place once every 2-3 months. So I bought a Dryel kit hoping that would do the trick and here's the problems:

1) That "Breezy Clean" scent is the only option and its horrible.

2) My clothes don't really seem clean, just slightly deodorized. I don't smoke and don't sweat much, but it seems this product is more for touch ups.

3) The refill kit costs about as much as the starter kit so it doesn't seem I'll be saving that much. Is there a way to make my own cleaning clothes (without a nasty smell) or another brand that is more affordable?

4) The bag seems small to me and only holds up to 4 items, seems like this might be a waste considering I pay $1 to use the dryer (I'm a renter).

Any tips other than handwashing would be helpful. There isn't a handwashing sink in the laundry room here and I find that when I've done that in the past I either ruined the item, it was too time consuming, or both.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,435 Posts
Good question. I got a fabulous dress for 5.00 at the thrift. Then found out it is 18.00 to have it cleaned!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,849 Posts
I don't have many dry clean only clothes, but I have used the Dryel kit. I don't remember much about the scent. I didn't have any stains on the clothes other than some perspiration stains and those were light. The procedure did clean those stains, and refreshed the entire garment. The color of the garment seemed brighter and cleaner. I took the garment out of the dryer while it was still slightly damp and that seemed to help with any wrinkling problems (this was silk). But I had to camp out by the dryer to make sure that I got it out at the correct time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,525 Posts
When I was working most of my clothes were dry clean only. I found that most dry clean only clothes can go through the cold gentle cycle. If you only have a couple of items you can put the items in a lingerie bag and wash. Just make sure to take lingerie bag out before putting laundry in dryer. Then hang up clothes to dry. You will need to iron the clothing or steam out the wrinkles. I found using the steam setting on my iron and hanging my clothes up then steaming away the wrinkles works fast instead of ironing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,935 Posts
I agree the scent is not as pleasant as they make it seem but it does dissipate after you hang the garment for a while. I had no problem ripping the moist towelette in half so the scent was as overpowering. I was going to suggest the cold gentle cycle on an HE machine with an extra spin cycle only to help get the excess water out. Then hang to dry and steam to freshen up/get wrinkles out as needed/desired. I only dry clean the bigger things, as needed (suits etc) but everything else gets Dryel if I can get away with it. (sweaters etc)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,022 Posts
i found it doesn't truly clean or get stains out so well. I tried it on a silk blend black ribbed turtleneck and the results were stinky and there was still a small salad dressing stain on it. upsetting as it was brand new from chicos!

lesson learned.

I suck it up and dry clean most things with a dry clean label. look for dry cleaning coupons or specials.

I even dryclean my nicer more expensive jeans. prevents shrinkage. and they look crisper. imho
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
346 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I just set a timer to make sure I took the clothes out of the dryer on time and found they were slightly damp as well. According to the Dryel instructions that's supposed to happen. I hung everything right away and now there are no wrinkles, which is good. The smell has faded a teeny bit, but it's still there. I'll try tearing the cloth in half next time to see if that helps.

We don't have HE machines here, but I've heard some of them have a dry clean setting. Might be nice to invest in something like that when I buy a home.

I do however wash everything on cold anyway so I could try the lingerie bag experiment on one item and see how it goes. That way if it doesn't work I just ruined one item lol. I hang dry a number of items already and use the steam from my regular showers to take out the wrinkles =)

I'm guessing lingerie bags are inexpensive and can be bought at places like Target? Funny how I'd never heard of lingerie bags until this thread. I figured women just threw that stuff out after wearing it once because it'd be ruined if you tried to wash it and it'd be embarrassing to take it to the dry cleaners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
581 Posts
Any tips other than handwashing would be helpful. There isn't a handwashing sink in the laundry room here and I find that when I've done that in the past I either ruined the item, it was too time consuming, or both.
I know you say you don't want to hand wash, but it wouldn't be all that hard or time consuming to do it in the bathtub (assuming you have a bathtub).
Since your clothes aren't really "dirty", just soak the item in cold water with a mild detergent - Woolite, or even mild shampoo - for 15 minutes or so.
Then rinse in cold water and hang to dry.
If you hang things while they're dripping, without wringing them out first, they might take awhile to dry, but probably would not be too wrinkled.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
346 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well I finally got around to trying the lingerie bag experiment and so far so good. For 3 bucks I got 2 bags, one large and one small and both were more spacious than expected. So in the large bag I put one pair of black work pants and a black blazer. In the smaller bag I put 2 shirts that don't need to be dry cleaned but they're made out of really thin material and shirts like that I find are generally ruined after a couple of washes.

Washed with cold water with my usual detergents and when the machine stopped it didn't look like anything was ruined. Everything stayed in the lingerie bags and I didn't see any obvious color bleeding. I just hung everything up to dry and nothing appears shrunken. Other than some wrinkles and a little lint it looks like it'll turn out ok.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,035 Posts
My HE washer has a "no spin/handwash" setting. I used to handwash my silk blouses that said "dry clean only". The only problem was that you couldn't really wring them out. I used to lay them between two huge towels and stick some extra towels underneath and then walk on the towel tower to wring them out. The blouses were laid flat and it did squish out most of the water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
346 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I didn't notice any excess water when I took everything out of the machine. I guess the spin cycle does a good job of taking care of that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Hot Dog. Finally a Post I can actually help out with. I keep getting a ton of good information and now I can finally give some.

I have several dry clean only suits, shirts, slacks, ties, and my wife has two dresses the same way. I have been doing the same thing for several years now and I still get compliments on my outfits. It all comes down to a single product. Cottonelle wet wipes. I place them in a pillowcase with the item to dry clean. Tie up the Pillowcase, or if you are lucky enough like me to have huge rubber bands, use them to tie off the top.

Quantities:

Ties: 3 Ties to a wipe
Shirts and blouses: 1 to 1 even
Slacks and Coats 2 wipes to 1 article

Place them in the dryer at fluff only for two hours. It cleans, deodorizes, and dry wipes can be used for fabric softener sheets when they are dried. The smell is light and it cleans as well. If your wipes aren't dry, just keep em in there longer.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
20,053 Posts
I bet a lot of stuff labeled dry clean only would go through the wash just fine. You'd have to either know what to look for as far as fabric type though, or be willing to experiment and not care if something got ruined. I would also wash separately in case something was not colorfast. No point ruining something else.

I've been buying gowns lately, some with some very elaborate embellishments, to use to make bereavement gowns for babies. Most are satin, some are other fabrics, all are labeled for dry cleaning only. Virtually all of them need to be cleaned. No way am I paying to dry clean a huge $5 wedding gown! I take the wedding gowns apart and wash as usual in the washer with our regular detergent and a nice big scoop of Oxyclean and then hang dry. The other gowns I don't take apart, since they're not as full so fit fine in my washer. Each and every one has come out looking beautiful with no damage. That won't work for all fabrics, but as I said, I'm sure there are a lot that could be washed, at least by hand if not in the washer, then hung to dry and maybe touched up with an iron if needed.

I use a warm wash with cold rinse for most of the gowns. If they're really bad, I sometimes use a hot wash and warm rinse. So far, again, no damage.

Sometimes I have treated spots and stains on the lace from the gowns, and not been gentle with it at all. So far, so good, even using all types of stain removers and brushes.

I don't think men's ties would wash well, but I could be wrong. I'd try an old one first. I've made a lot of ties but don't recall ever washing one.

Good tip about the wet wipes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,930 Posts
I have washed mens ties on the gentle cycle before. I then hang dry and touch up w/ the old towel over the item and iron trick. Once in awhile I have to tack down the back but keep in mind I buy used.

I used to just bucket plunge them and rinse under the shower head and hang dry.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top