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Discussion Starter #1
Any ideas of what to do with all the ash collected from a fireplace?
 

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You can make lye to make soap.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
I guess I can store it in buckets until I learn how to make lye soap.
 

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It is good for the garden or compost pile. :)
 

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That is was I was going to suggest! We sprinkle it around the garden and sprinkle it on the compost pile.

You could save it for soap, but you need to burn hardwoods only to use it for soap.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It is good for the garden or compost pile. :)
I have a composter. I can dump some of it in there. I guess I can dig a hole and pour it in the ground. That will be good into the ground freezes.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That is was I was going to suggest! We sprinkle it around the garden and sprinkle it on the compost pile.

You could save it for soap, but you need to burn hardwoods only to use it for soap.
oh.....Ok....I can just sprinkle it on the ground, especially where I am going to plant next year.
 

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That would depend on the Ph of your soil - wood ashes will raise your pH - if it's already alkaline (too sweet) not good - good for acid soil though. You can get a cheap pH tester at a garden store.
 

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Also depends on what you are planting, some things like it acidic and would not appreciate the ashes.

We use them on the driveway in the winter, to melt the ice. I saved a little bit to put on the asparagus, but generally couldn't produce ash fast enough to keep the driveway clear.

I wouldn't bother saving them for making lye. That is a very involved, messy, unpredictable process, and the soap you make from it is probably going to be harsh and unpleasant. That's why they invented lye flakes.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
That would depend on the Ph of your soil - wood ashes will raise your pH - if it's already alkaline (too sweet) not good - good for acid soil though. You can get a cheap pH tester at a garden store.
ok.....I will get a pH tester. thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Also depends on what you are planting, some things like it acidic and would not appreciate the ashes.

We use them on the driveway in the winter, to melt the ice. I saved a little bit to put on the asparagus, but generally couldn't produce ash fast enough to keep the driveway clear.

I wouldn't bother saving them for making lye. That is a very involved, messy, unpredictable process, and the soap you make from it is probably going to be harsh and unpleasant. That's why they invented lye flakes.
I already have a lot of ash from last year. So I probably could use it to melt the ice. Thanks!
 

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