Frugal Village Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,575 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I ran across this website and thought it might be useful to some.

You can search the nutritional value of what you are eating.

Nutrition facts, calories in food, labels, nutritional information and analysis – NutritionData.com

For example:

It will show you the nutrition facts label like this


Tell you the good and the bad of the food..
The good: This food is a good source of Protein, Riboflavin, Vitamin B12 and Phosphorus, and a very good source of Selenium.

The bad: This food is high in Saturated Fat, and very high in Cholesterol

Read More Nutrition Facts and Analysis for Egg, whole, cooked, fried
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,198 Posts
I will have to check this out and show to hubby! We are all trying to educated ourself more on nutrition.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
19,119 Posts
Mahalo Russ - great info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,302 Posts
Thanks Russ! Great tool to have handy! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,986 Posts
Thanks Russ.

Maybe now I can solve my 'fat label' mystery that I have never understood when reading labels.

Maybe someone knows.........IE: if the item had a 'total fat' listed as 5 mg..........has 2mg of saturated fat..........AND ABSOLUTELY NOTHING ELSE...........no chol., etc. Where/what are the other 3 mg. of fat???

Use to think it must be 'trans fat'.........but now they have to list that.........and it still happens. I'm confused!!!
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
19,119 Posts
Me too FF - bet Russ will be able to tell us!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,935 Posts
Not 100% sure on this but I believe that back on Jan 1/06 - all food products had to not only list the total # of fat grams/serving on a product but now the 'trans fat' as well. It seems they only singled out trans fat b/c its a useless fat and not good for you vs the good kind which you need. So while they don't list all the good fats...they make sure you know how much bad fat is in a product. And don't think its safe to assume that the rest are the good fats either - its just a fat that hasn't been mandated to be included in the fat break down on the label....yet.

Food labeling is pretty similar between Canada and US but there are some subtle differences, especially since these products bonce back and forth across the border often. Just try to keep your 'bad' fat intake down to prevent any heart issues and raising your bad and lowering your good fats.

Trans fat is the common name for unsaturated fat with trans-isomer fatty acid(s). Trans fats may be monounsaturated or polyunsaturated but never saturated.

No trans fats are essential fatty acids; indeed, the consumption of trans fats increases the risk of coronary heart disease[1][2] by raising levels of "bad" LDL cholesterol and lowering levels of "good" HDL cholesterol.[3] Health authorities worldwide recommend that consumption of trans fat be reduced to trace amounts. Trans fats from partially hydrogenated oils are more harmful than naturally occurring oils.[4]

Source: Trans fat - Wikipedia, the free [email protected]@[email protected]@/wiki/File:Ambox_globe_content.svg" class="image"><img alt="Globe icon." src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/bd/Ambox_globe_content.svg/48px-Ambox_globe_content.svg.png"@@[email protected]@commons/thumb/b/bd/Ambox_globe_content.svg/48px-Ambox_globe_content.svg.png


Here's a link from the FDA: Trans Fat Now Listed with Saturated Fat and Cholesterol on the Nutrition Facts Label
<i>Trans</i> Fat Now Listed with Saturated Fat and Cholesterol on the Nutrition Facts Label

I hope this info helps answer some of your questions.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top