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whom, as most people know, generally get a bunch of snow, mostly during the winter. Well, most of US have to move said snow to enable us to get out of the house, to the garage, to the driveway, to barns, sheds, etc. This involves the use of shovels, snow blowers, truck or tractor mounted plows which we have to operate ourselves or hire done.
(I'm trying to do baby steps here for those people down SOUTH who can't grasp exactly what I'm talking about...having only seen snow on television)
The amount of snow to move depends a lot on how deep it piles up over what area needs to be cleared. In my case, like today, wasn't much..a foot deep drift going to my drive another one in my drive, and 6" or so that the road plow threw into the end of my drive...A shovel job today. A couple days ago at least 8" the length of my drive, about 100 feet...If I wasn't on this site, I would have thought to have one of my son's buddies hit it with a truck mounted plow for $15.

I've got a few disks gone in my lower back. Regular shoveling hurts. Last year I saw a unique shovel in Mother Earth News and, well, I'm almost ashamed to say so, paid CASH for it (Ok, debit). Supposed to not be hard on the back to use. It's a weird looking contraption that I ain't going to try to describe. It's called a Wovel, as in wheeled shovel found at www.wovel.com

Unlike a lot of things that seem to good to be true....this one works as advertised. I don't even get winded using it as I did when I shoveled the drive. For the most part, I can clear wheel tracks in less than 15 minutes and clear the drive in 30.

Green and Thrifty Got to keep in the spirit of the forum....I didn't keep a record of the use last year, but I believe that if I paid to move my snow last year, it would have cost me more than my Wovel....it paid for itself the first year. Green-wise - no gas, no noise. Further, no chiropractor bills and got a bunch of exercise that I wouldn't have if some one else plowed my drive.

I don't get paid to write this. I just had to tell you guys/gals how to move a lot of snow without too much effort or cost.
 

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I grew up in Central NY and spent a lot of time shoveling snow when we got the Finger Lakes blowing it down from the north onto us. I never ever had issues shoveling snow as a kid with a regular shovel.

Then I moved to Western Canada and well, I still don't have issues with shoveling snow.

The only people that I know of that do have issues with shoveling snow around here are the ones who wait until the snow stops before shoveling it all. That = back pain and injury. The people that are out there for hours trying to shovel more than 6 inches of snow usually are the ones who end up at the chiropractor for ruptured/herniated disks in their backs or strains that could have been prevented.

The Wovel, while it looks neat, seems like a big waste of money to me. I have horrible back issues, but that's mainly from when I was in the Marine Corps and a lack of exercise these days. I don't have problems shoveling snow out here and we get a lot of shoveling practice because of our driveway and sidewalk. We all shovel portions of each others' sidewalk in our neighborhood as well.

I'd sooner move to Costa Rica where there's no snow than pay $120 for a snow shovel. :)

Oh and besides, people in the South see snow... trust me. :)
 
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Not sure about that wovel....but another good way to move snow is to PUSH it, as opposed to shovel it. Also, to not buy the heaviest snow shovel on the market.......it only gets heavier with snow on it.

The killer is when the snow PLOW comes through once you have your driveway shoveled/PUSHED clean......and blocks it again. And if it is late at night it can be ICE by morning.
 

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We live in central NY and get our share of snow. We live on a hill and the higher elevations do get hammered more.

My hubby has a kubota tractor with a blade to move our snow. He also has a snowblower he can use. He likes the blade better because he can angle it where it wants it to go. Tractor was a year old when we bought it and hubby paid cash. Big bucks.
It also is our lawn tractor. When he wanted the blade we had to go look for one at another tractor dealership. Just over $1200 for the blade by itself, and that was cash also.

We have a scraper type shovel, that we use out front of the house on the steps and front cement walk. I don't think we paid that much for it.

And I can give you the plow driver's viewpoint....
yes you will get some snow in your driveway when the plow goes by. You want your road plowed, right ?
And no you are not supposed to shovel it back out in the road, it is against the law. Don't forget there is a right of way that allows the municipalities to do their work.

When he has to be to work in the winter at 3:30 am , how do you think they get there ? It's on roads that are not good until they can get back on them with the plows. That's why we own a full size 4X4 truck with payments. Because he HAS to get to work. Not break down on the way. And no they don't pay well. You have to be availabe 24/7 in the winter. If it is a bad storm, you keep working. 10 and 12 hrs days can be the norm.
Last winter, he had one day that was 16 hrs long, with only out of the truck for a 30 minute lunch break. And then when he does come home, he wants something to eat, and then peace and quiet and sleep. No such thing as weekends.
And yes we get snow at the end of our driveway also. That is why the vehicle I drive is a 4x4 full size truck. I don't want to get stuck and have to call my grumpy other half. It's better to leave him alone in that plow truck.

I prefer to hibernate in the winter. It's safer.
I guess he is rubbing off on me too........ just call us,
old and grumpy ..........and tired of winter already.......
 
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Tough crowd, Lee. Tough crowd. ;) :crackup:
 

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I'm a big fan of the shovel myself. I do go out and shovel when "I" think there's been enough accumulation, not when its finally stopped snowing. Why make my work harder for me? My $10 shovel does a pretty danged good job too!

ladytoysdream - I feel for you. I have been in your shoes as that was one of the jobs that one of my ex's did. It's not fun at all especially when you wake them up by accident!

Plus I don't think my senior father would like to try to navigate the wovel...though the concept is great. Its just not meant for everyone :) I can see my dad throwing out his back trying to 'flip' the snow off of it once he's rolled it to wherever he'd like to put the snow.
 

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Sara - one of the toughest I've seen - glad I don't make a living at this.

MomToTwoBoys - I didn't have any problems shoveling snow when I was 32 either - wait til you pack on a few more years....

frugalfranny - the Wovel is a push type shovel...the difference is that once you push it as far as you can, you can push down on the handle and the wheel takes most of the weight of the snow....check out the web site and see (it's best not seen on dial-up).

ladytoysdream -If I'm out woveling when the plow comes by, I motion for the driver to keep the wing down. The problem I have with them is that they'll pick the wing up and NOT put snow in the end of my driveway if they see I just cleared it.

frugalwarrior2 - I don't have any teens within a mile of me. And like I said..it paid for itself the first year I had it. If something works well, saves me time, saves me money, saves my back, the little bit it costs is a bearable expense. Some people spend a lot more green to move white. Think of buying a $1500 snowblower that you use 10-15 times a year. It would pay for itself in 6.7-10 years at $15 "savings" per use...not counting maintenance and repairs.
 

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The Uncle down the road wanted hubby to plow his driveway this winter. He gets meals on wheels. So needs someone there by noon. No way the hubby could do it because of the time frame. He is having a guy do it for $ 400 for the season.
Our plow blade cost $ 1200 yes, so would be paid for in 3 winters. But hubby does use it year round. I swear, if he scraps the driveway one more time though with it..........
He did the pad for the chicken house with it end of August.

I'm just so tired of snow. And the cold. And the blowing snow.

Hubby started as the wingman the first winter. One has to pay attention so you don't take out mailboxes etc. Now he has his own plow but no wingman.

I rode with him in the other old truck when he took it to a parade for Brockways trucks. Let me tell you....the world looks REAL different when you sit high up in one of those. Going down main streets in a city is downright interesting.
And he tells me it's a whole new experience, when a truck quits going up a hill in the winter, and then you slide down it backwards.
So please cut the poor plow driver some slack....they are just doing their job, the way their boss tells them too. Their budgets have been cut this year. It's getting downright scary out there.
 

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well, I think the Wovel looks rather neat! too bad I never see SNOW!!! Nope, nada, zilch.

but what we do get is this nice, mushy, icy mess mixed with dirt, to create the best darn southern snowman ever!

 
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well, I think the Wovel looks rather neat! too bad I never see SNOW!!! Nope, nada, zilch.

but what we do get is this nice, mushy, icy mess mixed with dirt, to create the best darn southern snowman ever!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

You just come up here to NY...I'll send you home with all you want:)
 

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You just come up here to NY...I'll send you home with all you want:)
and I know this is going to sound like a crazy question - but does your snow TASTE good?

my favorite thing about any snow as a kid (and adult) is saving whatever I can & put it in a cup & pour a little syrup on it ~ or just to eat it plain ~ but it's soooo hard to get enough clean snow (there's just not enough)

sooooo - when I see pics of snow, real snow, I always want to EAT it - it just looks so CLEAN compared to the south.

*sigh*
 

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Well I think it's okay tasting. Now, if I had to boil some for water I would ,but put it throug a filter. Which sounds odd maybe.
Here in NY, we cannot do any outside burning , like in trash barrels at home. It is now a state NO NO . Maybe they are telling us our air quality is not so good anymore.
Thank goodness we can still use our outside wood furnace.
But one is not supposed to burn trash in them either. We never have, because we don't want to mess it up. It has to last us a long time.
 

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so, let me ask a really southern question...... what's an outside wood furnace for?

do you have to purchase fire wood to burn in the outside wood furnace to heat the inside of the home?

why not just have an indoor wood stove?

One small thing that I really like about the difference in northern states vs. southern states is the garbage service.

I would prefer mandantory recycling, as well as trash pick up provided by a city contracted service -

In some of the more rural areas of the south, people just throw their garbage in a pile and burn it. Regardless of what it is - while most of it IS recyclable, but they don't want to bother with taking items to recycle themselves. We only have one recycling center in this county. Luckily for me, it's not too far from home, but I can see why that would be a pain if I lived on the other end of the county - (30 minutes away)

wow, watch me ramble :toothy:
 

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so, let me ask a really southern question...... what's an outside wood furnace for?

do you have to purchase fire wood to burn in the outside wood furnace to heat the inside of the home?

why not just have an indoor wood stove?

One small thing that I really like about the difference in northern states vs. southern states is the garbage service.

I would prefer mandantory recycling, as well as trash pick up provided by a city contracted service -

In some of the more rural areas of the south, people just throw their garbage in a pile and burn it. Regardless of what it is - while most of it IS recyclable, but they don't want to bother with taking items to recycle themselves. We only have one recycling center in this county. Luckily for me, it's not too far from home, but I can see why that would be a pain if I lived on the other end of the county - (30 minutes away).........wow, watch me ramble :toothy:
Okay, watch me ramble :)
We do recycle as much as we can. We have a recyle center in the city about 6 miles from us.
We compost in the garden.
We have a county dump we can take the non recycles to. One has to buy a permit each year and you get charged by weight of the stuff you leave there. Pull on a scale going in, and when you come out, you get on the scale again. Then you pay the weigh station attendant.
Or one can pay a hauler to pick up once a week at your house. We don't do this because I don't want that extra cost.

We use a outside wood furnace for our heat source. Which means as my husband likes to put it...the fire is outside the house. We have a propane furnace in our house. We made the decision in May of 2008 to spend $ 9,800 to buy this Outside Wood Boiler, a OWB is the short nickname. Yes wood costs money but is cheaper for us as a heat source than propane would cost us. I said, I was sick and tired of being held hostage by propane prices.
The furnace was roughly $ 6500 and then all the misc hardware and pipes to get it hooked up. The OWB, heats water, that comes through the house via pex pipe and goes to the electric hot water heater first. Runs through that heat exchanger which means the wood is now heating our hot water, not the electric. Then runs through some more tubing into the heat exchanger under the propane furnace. Then it goes back to the OWB, and the water is reheated. It then recyles again through the pipes. We use our existing ductwork/set up . We shut the propane part of the furnace off. Just using the blower part now. I can keep the house at 75 plus. We now have our wood pile built up so we have enough for 2 winters ahead. We are very happy we made the decison to heat with wood.
We bought a 100 pound propane tank for our kitchen cook stove. We use about $ 11 a month in propane. A tank lasts us just over 7 months.

We did not want a wood furnace or pellet stove in the house. We did not want to argue with a insurance company. Our house is a double wide with 6 inch walls very well insulated. We did a upgrade 3 yrs ago, which included a new room, deck, new roof, siding and windows for the entire structure.
 

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fascinating. thank you for explaining to me. :D
 
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well, I think the Wovel looks rather neat! too bad I never see SNOW!!! Nope, nada, zilch.

but what we do get is this nice, mushy, icy mess mixed with dirt, to create the best darn southern snowman ever!

I love this photo. Cute cute cute southern snowman.
 

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I can't take credit for it - it was my friend Google. :toothy:

I used to have an actual photo of the most pitiful snowman that my son & I made years ago. Poor thing had red mud smeared through its body - it was a great pic of gool 'ol georgia snowman!!

I'll promise now to take pics of any attempts this winter!
 

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You guys that would just be a spring snowman here. Sticks left on the lawn,bits of grass and dirt all rolled together w/ snow. When I was a kid,when you could actually play at school,our whole grade would make snowmen. I took about 6-8 of us kids to roll the snowballs they got so big. They were snow boulders. Now there was NO WAY we could make a snowman out of these but we had contests as to what class could make the biggest one. It was fun.
 

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Grew up in the South but have lived placed where there was tons of snow. Shoveling snow is one of those tasks I learned early on needed to be done by someone other than me. I may consider a snowblower....in fact, hubby and I were just talking about one this afternoon. He said we didn't really need one because we'd probably only use it once or twice a year. I pointed to his other emergency supplies and said but isn't it nice to have these things if/when you need them? He couldn't argue with that one :)
 
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