Frugal Village Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We went to the career lesson last night. This is one that was hard for me.

The other lessons were all topics that lent themselves to making a plan and then executing the plan as time and income allowed.

This lesson though, especially the discussion questions left me a bit out of sorts.

My take home lesson from this FPU session is that career success can best be found by first determining who I am and then determining what careers I am a good fit for. I have precious little idea how to do this.

Given that I am contemplating retraining to a new career it might be a good idea to sort this out before spending money on classes.

Any suggestions are welcomed. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
I have a BA in psych, and this kind of thing is my fave part of it. :cheer4:

First off, take a personality test. There are some free ones online (just Google "personality test"), but if you are really serious about finding what's the best fit, I would recommend going to a career counselor and taking the real one. And 2nd, a career counselor will help you find the best type of job for you, based on your personality, likes, interests, family situation, etc. Sometimes, you have to try on a few hats in order to figure it out, too, depending on your personality type. Good luck!
 
  • Like
Reactions: mek42

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have a BA in psych, and this kind of thing is my fave part of it. :cheer4:

First off, take a personality test. There are some free ones online (just Google "personality test"), but if you are really serious about finding what's the best fit, I would recommend going to a career counselor and taking the real one. And 2nd, a career counselor will help you find the best type of job for you, based on your personality, likes, interests, family situation, etc. Sometimes, you have to try on a few hats in order to figure it out, too, depending on your personality type. Good luck!
Small world, my first bachelor degree is a BA in Psych. I remember back then I was an INTJ on the Myers-Briggs (I hope I'm remembering the name of the test right).

Would the unemployment office and/or career center of colleges I am an alumnus of be good places to look for career counseling? At this point, such trips will need to wait until September, as I am not willing to justify time off from work so close to being laid off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
854 Posts
What did your guidance councilor in high school tell you? Mine told me that I like outdoors and working by myself...ended up 30 years as a rural letter carrier. Took a few jobs to get there, but started it 13 years out of HS.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Small world, my first bachelor degree is a BA in Psych. I remember back then I was an INTJ on the Myers-Briggs (I hope I'm remembering the name of the test right).

Would the unemployment office and/or career center of colleges I am an alumnus of be good places to look for career counseling? At this point, such trips will need to wait until September, as I am not willing to justify time off from work so close to being laid off.
Yes, that's it, and even smaller world, my husband is an INTJ! There is a forum he goes to specifically for this personality type. INTJ Forum They would be a great help to you finding your dream job. I definitely encourage you to go there.

The unemployment office or previous college's career centers would give you a good start. Or, if you want to attend another college, their career center would be good, too. Any licensed psychologist/counselor could probably give you a recommendation on a good career counselor, as well, and also some of the job placement agencies can be a good start, too.

Hope this helps!
 
  • Like
Reactions: mek42

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,360 Posts
Parker- They told me I should be a forest ranger or a secretary. I do hope they have come further. I managed retail stores but I did end up working for the Boy Scouts in their store?? And volunteering at animal rescues??
Grandma said I should have been a vet. Too bad she didn't cough up $100,000 to go w/ that thought.lol

Mek- how far is that into the course. We just did dumping debt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Parker- They told me I should be a forest ranger or a secretary. I do hope they have come further. I managed retail stores but I did end up working for the Boy Scouts in their store?? And volunteering at animal rescues??
Grandma said I should have been a vet. Too bad she didn't cough up $100,000 to go w/ that thought.lol

Mek- how far is that into the course. We just did dumping debt.
It is near the end. There are only 1 or 2 classes left now.

All I remember from HS is that every male was told they should be a bricklayer. It made it to top 25 list for all of us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
It is near the end. There are only 1 or 2 classes left now.

All I remember from HS is that every male was told they should be a bricklayer. It made it to top 25 list for all of us.
:laugh: :screwy: That is truly weird... :laugh:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
All I remember from HS is that every male was told they should be a bricklayer. It made it to top 25 list for all of us.
We had similar results out our highschool. On career counseling day, we all were recommended to take jobs that had a shortage of staff during that time. It's as if they've picked the top 10 jobs that have too few people doing it and recommended that.

It has been my only encounter with a career counselor but that put me off for good. Never visited another one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ok, based on the FOCUS career aptitude survey, both med. / health physics and financial sector are inline with who the computer says I am. (I had to extrapolate for the physics, as those careers, while undersupplied, are so low density that they usually don't show up as specific careers - not even at Bureau of Labor Statistics / Occupational Outlook Handbook.)

So I'll focus on planning out pros and cons of each path and try to narrow the possibilities within the financial sector.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
Interesting situation. Good luck to you.

There are so many people that have graduated with MS, MA, MBA's in the last few years that have moved back in with mom and dad, and are competing for restaurant jobs. Graduate inventory is very high, with little demand, just like the housing inventory levels.

It's a very good time to analyze things very carefully like you are doing. The $ put into new training can be very risky in this type of economy.

My employer is working us to the bone. If the economy ever turns around there will be many people with hard feelings about the way they were treated, and turnover rates will be extremely high.

I'm not holding my breath on this economy. The private MBS market completely locked up in Aug 2007, signaling the start of the crisis in the bond market, and the stock market followed quickly. The point being, that it's been 3 years already and this thing could be a lost decade, or two decades with the population (boomer retirement) and debt challenges in front of us. Nothing on this scale in the way of a debt based monetary bubble has ever existed in human history.

An interesting time to be alive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
Interesting situation. Good luck to you.

There are so many people that have graduated with MS, MA, MBA's in the last few years that have moved back in with mom and dad, and are competing for restaurant jobs. Graduate inventory is very high, with little demand, just like the housing inventory levels.

It's a very good time to analyze things very carefully like you are doing. The $ put into new training can be very risky in this type of economy.

My employer is working us to the bone. If the economy ever turns around there will be many people with hard feelings about the way they were treated, and turnover rates will be extremely high.

I'm not holding my breath on this economy. The private MBS market completely locked up in Aug 2007, signaling the start of the crisis in the bond market, and the stock market followed quickly. The point being, that it's been 3 years already and this thing could be a lost decade, or two decades with the population (boomer retirement) and debt challenges in front of us. Nothing on this scale in the way of a debt based monetary bubble has ever existed in human history.

An interesting time to be alive.
I totally agree. I think we may be in a slow growth period for quite awhile. Our economy may be following in Japan's footsteps.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top