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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had called the gas company today with a few questions...one of them was about turning the gas down from 67* to 60* when I'm not gonna be home for a few hours....
SHOCKING what I learned....
She said to NOT turn it down so far...She said to only turn it down to 65* because when you get home and turn the heat up to the desired 67* it takes more energy to bring it up than it would to leave it at an even level.....
I mentioned that I drop it to 60* from 9pm-6am then its 67* from
6am-9pm...She didnt say anything about that....maybe because its 9 hours? not just a few hours?
Any thoughts on this? Wonder if there's info online about this....
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
This is what I found on a few sites...

Does it really save energy to turn my thermostat back at night in the winter?

Turning the thermostat down saves energy and money.

•Your home will lose less heat when the inside temperature is lower.
•The longer your home is at a lower temperature, the more you save.
•While your furnace will run for a longer period when the temperature is turned back up, the energy saved during setback is more.
Consider getting a setback thermostat.

•Program it to turn down when you are asleep and when you are gone.
•The temperature can be set to come back up before you get up or get back home so you will stay comfortable.
•You can save about 1% on your heating bill for every degree you regularly set the temperature back for an eight-hour period.
•We recommend a 5- to 10-degree setback.
•The elderly and children less than two weeks old may need warmer temperatures.
•Check with your doctor if you have health concerns.
 

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I agree with turning it down when you can....or when you will be away.

I don't turn mine down that far but will turn it down 2 - 4 degrees when I am leaving.

I don't have it any higher than 65 during the day. I turn it down to 58 at night and then only up to 63 for first thing in the morning.....just enough to 'kick the furnace on'........and go from there......
 

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I don't have it any higher than 65 during the day. I turn it down to 58 at night and then only up to 63 for first thing in the morning.....just enough to 'kick the furnace on'........and go from there......
this is me too. 58 when I'm asleep or at work, 64 when I'm home.
 

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I agree with turning it down when you can....or when you will be away.

I don't turn mine down that far but will turn it down 2 - 4 degrees when I am leaving.

I don't have it any higher than 65 during the day. I turn it down to 58 at night and then only up to 63 for first thing in the morning.....just enough to 'kick the furnace on'........and go from there......
Same here!

Though if I can be real excited for a moment. I installed a new energy efficient furnace and hope it will do so much better for us. Now when I say energy efficient it is a 92 % as we have an older Victorian so you can't put anything higher then that , without changing many things so not worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
usually we shrink wrap the inside windows but this year we did the outside (the plastic for that was only $5.99 at JobLot vs. $9.99 for the indoor shrink plastic..) I was able to turn it down to 66* during the day...I'm thinking that I'm just gonna use the outside plastic inside too...:D
 

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She said to NOT turn it down so far...She said to only turn it down to 65* because when you get home and turn the heat up to the desired 67* it takes more energy to bring it up than it would to leave it at an even level.....
She failed thermodynamics.
 
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Sure...

Engage in a thought experiment with me for a moment.

Picture a 1 gallon milk jug filled with water.

Punch a hole in the side of the jug, right at the bottom.

What happens?

The water SHOOTS out of the jug, propelled by all the pressure of the water that's above the hole you just made.

But as time passes and the jug empties out, the water coming out of the hole slows to a trickle, and eventually to a drip. The hole stays the same size, but the speed the water comes out is higher when there's more water, and almost nothing when the water is almost gone.

That water pressure change is a good visual to illustrate how thermodynamics works when it comes to heat exchanges (heat loss) between substances (like inside and outside) at different temperatures.

When there is a high temperature differential (ie: it's really cold outside and really hot inside), heat flows from the hot to the cold very very fast. When the temperature differential is not very great (it's warm inside and warm outside), heat moves more slowly.

(This is why people mistakenly say "hot water freezes faster". It doesn't - but it does cool more rapidly than cold water - cause it's so much hotter. Water at 200 degrees will go to 150 degrees in a few minutes, but water at 100 degrees will go to 50 degrees much more slowly, and from 50 to 0 takes even longer).

So - the cooler you make your house in winter, the slower you lose heat. The warmer you make your house in summer, the slower you lose cold (another misnomer but it works). Losing it more slowly means you lose less, so your furnace/ac doesn't have to work as hard to keep up.

Now, when you decide to make the house comfortable again, yes, your furnace or a/c has to work hard to get to temp you want - but that is a relatively short burst of work. Maybe it runs for 20 minutes to get where you want it, while usually it only runs for a few minutes at a time. BUT to MAINTAIN the comfortable temp, it has to run a few minutes at a time OVER, and OVER, and OVER again.

Try this sometime - let your house cool down to 60. Then put the thermostat on 70 and time how long the furnace runs. Once it shuts off, pay attention to how often it comes on again, and for how long. If it takes 20 minutes to go from 60 to 70, then after it hits 70, see how long it takes for the furnace to run for 20 minutes again. In other words - if the furnace kicks on for 3 minutes at a time once you get the house to 70, then time how long it takes for the 3 minute cycle to execute 7 times (total running time, 21 minutes). So if it comes on for 3 mins every 20 mins, then in 2.5 hours it'll have come on more than 7 times.

In that case, if you're leaving the furnace at 60 for more than 3 hours - you're saving money.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Wow! Thanks! That makes sense..
I feel better now.. I feel like I'm wasting energy and money when I go out and leave the heat set...
 

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I turn mine down to 65 at night and then it's back up to 68 during the day. I've learned to live with wearing slippers, but my dang cold hands suffer...

so I'll turn it up a couple of degrees.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'm gonna buy another 2 rolls of the outside plastic and use it inside.. It's ALOT cheaper than the shrink kind...
I'm hoping it'll trap more heat so I can turn the heat down more...
Surprisingly it's not cold in here with just the outside,downstairs windows plasticed(sp) off...I cant stand freezing...:D
 

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The company you buy your fuel from will tell you not to turn your temp down more than a few degrees. Only reason they tell you this, is they want you to burn more fuel, so you will need more fillups. It's all about the dollars. They want more of your money in their pockets.

When we used propane for heat, I would adjust the temp by a couple of degrees during the day to save what I could while he was at work. If I didn't get it turned back up quick enough before he got home, he would not be happy with me. I tried to stay about 68 degrees. Now that we have wood heat, it's about 75+ in here and I just laugh when the propane truck drives by.
We just could not afford their rising prices every year.
 
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